Skip to main content

Full text of "Washington, west of the Cascades; historical and descriptive; the explorers, the Indians, the pioneers, the modern;"

See other formats


NYPL  RESEARCH  LIBRARIES 


08178385 


irA[i:^ 


I  X\4 


\  \ 


WASHINGTON 


West  of  the  Cascades 


ILLUSTRATED 


VOLUME  II 


CHICAGO  SEATTLE  TACOMA 

THE  S.  J.  CLAEKE  PUBLISHING  COMPANY 

1917 


■•>>>' 

J   4       u 


(/V\SVVN> 


. ;  --J  3 » 


367660A 


O  '•■'>'.'■  O'-l 


iC...:.     I 


^       ■^:^  NEW  YOM 
■..,rc  LIBRARY 


VviTOR,    LENOX 
^'ILDEN   FOUNDATION 


JOHN  J.  DONOVAN 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


JOHN  JOSEPH  DONOVAN. 

There  are  times  when  human  effort  and  enterprise  seem  to  have  no  limit, 
when  the  door  of  opportunity  continuously  opens  to  the  insistent  demands  of 
the  individual  and  when  ability  finds  its  justification  and  reaps  its  reward  in 
notable  success.  Such  has  been  the  record  of  John  Joseph  Donovan,  whose 
work  has  been  a  vital  force  in  the  development  and  upbuilding  of  the  northwest. 
He  has  directed  and  controlled  affairs  of  great  magnitude,  in  many  of  which  the 
public  has  been  a  large  indirect  beneficiary,  while  at  the  same  time  his  fortunes 
have  enjoyed  a  just  increase.  Mr.  Donovan  seems  to  think  there  is  nothing 
unusual  in  his  life  record,  but  when  judged  by  what  the  great  majority  of  men 
accomplish  his  history  stands  out  as  a  notable  example  of  the  force  of  perse- 
verance, determination,  clear  vision  and  sound  judgment. 

Mr.  Donovan  was  born  at  Rumney,  New  Hampshire,  September  8,  1858,  his 
parents  being  Patrick  and  Julia  ( O'Sullivan)  Donovan,  the  former  a  native  of 
County  Cork,  Ireland,  and  the  latter  of  County  Kerry.  The  educational  op- 
portunities of  the  father  were  limited,  but  laudable  ambition  prompted  him  to 
try  his  fortune  in  the  new  world  and  in  1852  he  arrived  in  the  United  States, 
after  which  he  secured  a  position  in  connection  with  the  building  of  the  Boston, 
Concord  &  ^Montreal  Railroad  in  New  Hampshire.  His  ability  soon  won  him 
promotion  to  foreman  and  with  his  savings  he  afterward  purchased  a  farm  near 
Plymouth,  New  Hampshire,  where  he  carried  on  general  agricultural  pursuits 
until  he  permanently  put  aside  business  cares  and  took  up  his  abode  in  the  town 
of  Plymouth,  where  he  passed  away.  It  was  in  July,  1856,  in  Concord,  New 
Hampshire,  that  he  wedded  Miss  Julia  O'Sullivan,  and  to  them  were  born  seven 
children:  John  Joseph:  Katharine,  who  is  now  living  in  Plymouth;  Dennis,  who 
died  in  infancy;  Mary  Agnes,  who  became  the  wife  of  George  Lynch,  of  Lan- 
caster, New  Hampshire,  but  both  are  now  deceased;  Julia  Teresa,  the  wife  of 
Hon.  F.  F.  Blake,  of  Plymouth,  New  Hampshire,  who  served  in  the  legislature 
of  his  state;  Daniel  P.,  who  was  general  agent  for  the  Northwestern  Life  Insur- 
ance Company  of  Milwaukee  at  Boston  and  died  in  191 1;  and  Margaret,  the 
wife  of  A.  N.  Gilbert,  of  Berlin,  New  Hampshire,  who  was  formerly  mayor  of 
his  city  and  is  now  an  architect  and  building  contractor  doing  business  in  Massa- 
chusetts and  New  Hampshire. 

The  boyhood  and  youth  of  John  J.  Donovan  passed  without  any  unusual 
incident,  his  attention  being  given  to  farm  work,  to  the  acquirement  of  an  edu- 

5 


6  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

cation  and  to  the  enjoyment  of  such  sports  as  occupied  the  attention  of  the 
youths  of  his  locality.  He  supplemented  his  public  school  course  by  study  in  the 
New  Hampshire  State  Normal  School,  from  which  he  was  graduated,  and  then 
devoted  three  years  to  teaching  in  the  schools  of  New  Hampshire  and  Massa- 
chusetts. The  funds  thus  secured  enabled  him  to  carry  out  his  well  defined  pur- 
pose, that  of  pursuing  a  course  in  engineering  in  the  Polytechnic  School  at 
Worcester,  Massachusetts,  and  in  1880  he  entered  that  institution,  from  which 
he  was  graduated  with  valedictorian  honors  in  a  class  of  thirty-one  in  1882. 
The  ambition  which  prompted  him  to  take  high  rank  in  his  class  foreshadowed 
the  spirit  which  has  actuated  him  in  all  of  his  undertakings.  He  has  never  been 
content  with  the  second  best  but  has  striven  for  the  attainment  of  perfection  in  all 
that  he  has  attempted.  About  the  time  of  his  graduation  the  Northern  Pacific 
Railway  Company  was  completing  its  transcontinental  system  and  applied  to 
the  engineering  school  at  Worcester,  Massachusetts,  to  engage  two  members  of 
the  graduating  class  for  engineering  work  along  its  line.  The  two  chosen  were 
John  J.  Donovan  and  J.  Q.  Barlow,  the  latter  having  also  risen  to  eminence  in 
railway  and  engineering  circles,  being  assistant  chief  engineer  of  the  Southern 
Pacific  Railway.  Going  at  once  to  Montana,  they  were  given  employment  in 
adjacent  fields,  Mr.  Donovan's  first  duties  being  those  of  rodman  of  a  surveying 
crew  far  in  advance  of  the  western  terminus.  After  a  month  he  was  made  lev- 
eler,  while  six  months'  service  brought  to  him  the  position  of  assistant  engineer 
of  construction.  He  celebrated  his  twenty-fifth  birthday  by  attending  the  impos- 
ing and  impressive  ceremonies  which  were  arranged  by  Henry  Villard,  presi- 
dent of  the  Northern  Pacific  Railway  Company,  in  honor  of  the  completion  of 
the  road  by  connection  of  the  eastern  and  western  divisions  at  Gold  Creek, 
Montana,  on  which  occasion  Mr.  Villard's  guests  were  taken  to  Gold  Creek  in 
five  Pullman  trains  and  included  such  distinguished  personages  as  President 
Ulysses  S.  Grant,  William  M.  Evarts,  English  and  German  noblemen  who  were 
financially  interested  in  the  Northern  Pacific,  eminent  engineers  and  railway 
officials,  a  number  of  Crow  Indian  chieftains,  cattlemen  of  the  neighboring 
ranches,  several  companies  of  United  States  soldiers  and  the  usual  corps  of 
newspaper  correspondents.  All  night  long  Mr.  Donovan  rode  over  lonely  trails 
to  reach  Gold  Creek  and  he  remembers  the  ceremonies  on  that  occasion  as  among 
the  most  impressive  he  has  ever  witnessed.  He  then  returned  to  camp  and  when 
he  had  completed  some  important  truss  bridge  work  was  transferred  to  Wash- 
ington, where  his  duties  connected  him  with  the  construction  of  the  Cascade 
division  of  the  Northern  Pacific  as  engineer  of  track  and  bridges,  locating 
engineer  and  engineer  in  charge.  His  first  work  was  about  fifteen  miles  east 
of  the  present  town  of  Prosser  and  later  as  one  of  the  engineers  on  the  Cascade 
tunnel  project  he  ran  surveys  for  that  great  bore,  crossing  the  mountains  almost 
daily  throughout  the  winter  when  twenty  feet  of  snow  lay  upon  their  summits. 
He  rode  in  the  saddle  on  the  trails  but  had  to  cross  the  summit  on  snowshoes. 
On  the  ist  of  June,  1887,  the  zigzag  track  of  the  switchback,  which  invariably 
precedes  the  tunnel  on  large  projects,  was  completed,  so  that  the  Northern  Pa- 
cific could  take  people  to  the  coast  over  its  own  lines.  At  that  time  Mr.  Donovan 
was  engineer  in  charge  of  the  Cascade  division  west.  A  month  later  when 
granted  a  vacation  he  visited  Alaska  and  also  his  old  New  England  home,  but 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  7 

in  September,  1887,  returned  to  the  west  to  take  charge  of  the  construction  of 
a  number  of  Hnes  then  being  built  by  the  Northern  Pacific  to  connect  important 
mining  camps  with  the  main  line  in  Montana.  Upon  the  completion  of  that 
work  in  1888  he  again  went  to  New  England  and  when  he  returned  to  Helena, 
Montana,  in  the  same  year  he  was  accompanied  by  his  bride. 

Mr.  Donovan's  value  in  professional  connections  was  recognized  by  others 
aside  from  the  Northern  Pacific  officials  and  various  business  propositions  were 
made  him,  so  that  he  finally  resigned  his  position  with  the  railroad  company  to 
accept  the  office  of  chief  engineer  for  important  enterprises  then  being  estab- 
lished on  Bellingham  bay.  From  Helena  he  went  to  Tacoma  and  in  December, 
1888,  arrived  at  Fairhaven,  which  later  became  a  part  of  Bellingham.  There 
were  no  stores  in  the  town,  merely  a  little  cluster  of  dwellings  in  the  midst  of 
dense  forests,  and  the  total  population  of  Bellingham  bay  was  not  more  than 
five  hundred,  including  men,  women  and  children.  One  traveled  from  Fair- 
haven  to  Whatcom  by  the  water  route,  using  a  rowboat,  for  the  road  between 
the  two  places  was  impassable.  Under  the  direction  of  Mr.  Donovan  as  chief 
engineer  the  companies  with  which  he  was  associated  soon  wrought  marked 
changes,  his  being  the  directing  force  in  all  of  this  important  work.  As  chief 
engineer  of  the  Fairhaven  Land  Company,  the  Skagit  Coal  &  Transportation 
Company  and  the  Fairhaven  &  Southern  Railway  Company  he  directed  the 
building  of  a  railroad,  the  opening  of  coal  mines  on  the  Skagit  river,  the  plat- 
ting of  the  town  site  of  Fairhaven  and  the  construction  of  its  wharves.  Fair- 
haven was  organized  as  a  city  and  public  improvements  of  importance  were 
inaugurated  and  carried  to  completion.  At  this  time  he  served  on  the  city  coun- 
cil for  two  terms,  being  chairman  of  the  street  and  sewer  committee.  Another 
important  progressive  step  was  made  in  1890,  when  the  Fairhaven  &  Southern 
Railway  Company  projected  a  line  from  Vancouver,  British  Columbia,  south  to 
Portland,  Oregon,  and  east  to  Spokane.  The  surveys  were  completed  and  eighty 
miles  of  the  road  had  been  constructed  and  was  under  operation  when  the  com- 
pany sold  out  to  the  Great  Northern  system  and  Mr.  Donovan  retired  as  chief 
engineer.  Once  more  he  visited  the  Atlantic  coast  and  upon  his  return  to  the 
west  became  engineer  for  the  tide  land  appraisers  and  afterward  chief  engineer 
of  the  Blue  Canyon  Coal  Mining  Company  and  the  Bellingham  Bay  &  Eastern 
Railway  Company,  formed  by  Montana  capital  in  1891.  The  railway  company 
gradually  extended  its  lines  from  Fairhaven  to  Wickersham  on  the  Northern 
Pacific  by  way  of  Lake  Whatcom  and  in  1902  the  Northern  Pacific  took  over  the 
road.  In  1898  Mr.  Donovan  was  made  general  superintendent  and  chief  engi- 
neer of  the  Bellingham  Bay  &  British  Columbia  Railway  and  immediately  began 
the  survey  work  for  the  extension  of  the  line  to  Spokane.  The  companies 
under  Mr.  Donovan's  direction  devoted  much  time  and  capital  to  prospecting 
for  coal  and  other  minerals  and  to  developing  valuable  water  power  on  the 
Nooksack  at  Nooksack  Falls.  The  water  power  was  later  sold  to  Stone  & 
Webster,  of  Boston,  Mr.  Donovan  making  a  special  trip  to  the  east  to  negotiate 
the  deal.  The  Blue  Canyon  coal  mines  were  leased  to  another  company  and 
the  property  is  now  being  gradually  developed. 

In    1898  Peter  Larson,  Julius  H.  Bloedel  and  Mr.   Donovan  organized  the 
Lake  Whatcom  Logging  Company,  of  which  Mr.  Larson  became  president,  Mr. 


8  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

Donovan  vice  president  and  Mr.  Bloedel  manager.  In  1900  they  also  organized 
the  Larson  Lumber  Company  and  built  a  mill  at  the  town  of  Larson  on  Lake 
Whatcom,  the  latter  company  having  the  same  officers  as  the  former.  At  the 
time  of  the  organization  Mr.  Donovan  became  president  of  the  Lake  Whatcom 
Logging  Company  and  on  the  ist  of  April,  1913,  that  company  and  the  Larson 
Lumber  Company  reorganized  and  Mr.  Bloedel  became  president  with  Mr. 
Donovan  as  vice  president.  This  company  now  owns  three  sawmills,  one  in 
Bellingham  and  two  at  Larson,  and  they  also  have  two  shingle  mills  at  Larson 
and  one  at  Blanchard,  Washington.  Their  properties  also  include  logging 
camps  with  five  units  or  sides  at  Alger  and  Delvan  respectively.  They  operate 
thirty  miles  of  railroad,  own  six  locomotives  and  complete  rolling  stock.  The 
company  has  acquired  timber  lands  in  Skagit  and  Whatcom  counties  which 
include  twelve  hundred  million  feet  of  timber  all  at  moderate  elevation,  while 
all  is  in  solid  blocks.  This  timber  has  all  been  acquired  through  purchase  from 
one  hundred  different  owners  and  none  of  it  from  the  government,  railroad 
companies  or  by  filing  scrip.  They  employ  directly  one  thousand  people.  Aside 
from  his  extensive  interests  along  that  line  i\Ir.  Donovan  is  vice  president  of 
the  First  National  Bank  of  Bellingham. 

In  Somerville,  Massachusetts,  April  29,  1888,  Mr.  Donovan  was  united  in 
marriage  to  Miss  Clara  Isabel  Nichols  and  they  have  become  the  parents  of 
three  children.  Helen  Elizabeth,  the  eldest,  is  a  graduate  of  Dana  Hall,  Welles- 
ley,  Massachusetts,  and  also  of  Smith  College  and  was  studying  music  in  Ber- 
lin, Germany,  at  the  time  of  the  outbreak  of  the  present  war.  John  Nichols, 
twenty-five  years  of  age,  graduated  in  civil  engineering  from  the  Worcester 
Polytechnic  Institute  in  1913  and  was  a  civil  engineer  with  the  Northern  Pacific 
Railroad  Company  for  a  year.  He  is  now  efficiency  engineer  for  the  Bloedel 
Donovan  Lumber  Mills  at  Bellingham,  Washington.  He  was  married  in  Belling- 
ham in  September,  1914,  to  Miss  Geraldine  Goodheart,  and  John  N.  Jr.,  born 
May  12,  1916,  is  the  pride  of  the  family.  Philip,  twenty-three  years  of  age, 
completed  a  course  in  mechanical  engineering  at  the  Worcester  Polytechnic 
Institute  in  191 5  and  is  now  active  as  his  father's  secretary  and  purchasing 
agent.  In  July,  1916,  he  married  Miss  Hazel  Hart  Prigmore,  daughter  of  the 
late  Judge  Prigmore  of  Seattle  and  on  May  23,  1917,  Philip  Hart  entered  their 
home. 

Mr.  Donovan  is  a  member  of  the  Catholic  church  and  is  now  president  of 
the  Catholic  Federation  of  Washington.  He  has  also  taken  the  fourth  degree 
in  the  Knights  of  Columbus  and  has  held  high  offices  in  the  order.  He  is  prom- 
inently identified  with  many  club  and  trade  societies  and  organizations  for  the 
benefit  of  the  public.  His  standing  in  business  circles  is  indicated  by  the  fact 
that  he  was  honored  with  the  presidency  of  the  Pacific  Logging  Congress  from 
191 3  until  1915.  Several  times  he  has  been  president  of  the  Chamber  of  Com- 
merce of  Bellingham  and  he  belongs  to  the  Commercial  Club  of  Tacoma,  the 
American  Historical  Society  and  the  American  Irish  Historical  Society.  That 
he  casts  his  influence  in  support  of  cultural  forces  is  indicated  by  his  member- 
ship in  the  Washington  State  Art  Association.  He  is  likewise  a  life  member 
of  the  Navy  League  and  he  has  membership  in  the  Bellingham  Country  Club, 
the  Cougar  Club  of  Bellingham  and  the  Rainier  Club  of  Seattle.     He  is  a  mem- 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  9 

ber  of  the  American  Society  of  Civil  Engineers  and  was  one  of  the  organizers 
of  the  Montana  Society  of  Engineers,  with  which  he  is  still  connected.  He  has 
long  been  an  ardent  advocate  of  the  good  roads  movement  and  was  a  leader 
in  the  fight  for  fortifications  for  Bellingham  bay.  He  is  a  forceful  writer  and 
a  frequent  contributor  of  timely  articles  on  vital  subjects  to  the  press.  Belling- 
ham has  no  citizen  who  has  been  more  keenly  alive  to  the  city's  needs  and  possi- 
bilities or  who  has  persisted  with  greater  energy  and  success  in  attaining  them. 

In  politics  Mr.  Donovan  is  a  stanch  republican  and  has  been  a  recognized 
leader  in  political  circles  in  his  part  of  the  state.  He  would  never  consent  to 
become  an  ofiice  holder,  yet  it  would  have  been  possible  for  him  to  secure  almost 
any  position  that  he  might  desire,  so  great  is  the  confidence  reposed  in  his  ability 
and  public  spirit.  He  was  chairman  of  the  state  commission  of  forest  legisla- 
tion under  Governor  Hay,  which  commission  was  characterized  as  "twelve  of 
the  strong  men  of  the  state."  Under  appointment  of  Governor  McGraw  in  1894 
he  was  a  member  of  the  first  state  highway  commission,  for  which  he  has  since 
been  a  worker,  striving  earnestly  to  promote  good  roads.  He  was  also  on  the 
state  board  of  charities  and  corrections  for  some  years.  He  has  given  most  lib- 
erally of  his  time  and  money  to  hospital  work  and  he  served  in  an  advisory 
capacity  in  connection  with  St.  Joseph's  Hospital  of  Bellingham  for  years.  He 
instituted  progressive  and  humanitarian  ideas  in  connection  with  his  mills  and 
camps  which  have  been  generally  adopted  by  other  big  companies.  Small  reduc- 
tions in  the  men's  pay  guaranteed  them  medical  attention  and  hospital  service 
when  needed  and  gave  them  a  choice  of  hospitals — St.  Joseph's  or  St.  Luke's 
— and  any  surgeon  or  physician  they  might  select.  For  eight  years  he  was  a 
trustee  of  the  State  Normal  School  and  he  was  a  member  of  the  charter  com- 
mission of  fifteen  which  framed  the  charter  of  the  city  of  Bellingham  when 
Fairhaven  and  Whatcom  united.  This  charter  proved  so  satisfactory  that  later 
the  people  rejected  the  idea  of  a  commission  form  of  government,  deeming  the 
old  charter  to  be  more  efficient  and  up-to-date.  Mr.  Donovan  was  also  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Municipal  League  for  Civic  Reforms  and  he  has  always  been  on  the 
side  of  temperance,  serving  on  the  executive  committee  in  the  fight  for  prohibi- 
tion. Bellingham  was  one  of  the  first  cities  of  the  state  to  go  dry  by  men's 
votes  and  it  remained  consistently  dry  through  all  reactions  and  was  dry  for 
six  years  before  the  state  prohibition  law  was  passed.  Bellingham  therefore 
had  no  trouble  in  applying  the  statewide  law. 

In  a  summary  of  his  life  it  is  noticeable  that  Mr.  Donovan  as  a  man  is  far- 
seeing,  honest  and  public-spirited  and  throughout  his  life  has  operated  boldly 
and  continuously  in  the  business  field  and  by  the  stimulus  of  his  efforts  has 
aroused  the  enterprise  of  others,  through  which  means  he  has  added  to  his 
own  great  labors  and  furnished  hundreds  of  workmen  with  remunerative  em- 
ployment. He  has  never  been  a  public  man  in  the  ordinary  sense  but  during  all 
his  business  life  he  has  held  many  important  relations  to  the  public  interest 
through  the  business  concerns  he  has  conducted,  for  in  all  of  them  the  public 
has  been  a  large  indirect  beneficiary.  He  has  never  sought  to  figure  promi- 
nently before  the  public  in  any  light  or  any  relation,  yet  his  influence  has  been 
felt  as  a  strong,  steady  moving  force  in  the  social,  moral  and  industrial  move- 
ments of  the  community  rather  than  seen.     There  is  one  point  in  his  career  to 


10  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

which  his  many  friends  refer  with  pride  and  that  is,  whether  as  a  prominent 
lumberman  or  financier,  he  has  always  been  the  same  genial,  courteous  gentle- 
man whose  ways  are  those  of  refinement  and  whose  word  no  man  can  question. 


HARRY  CLAY  HEERMANS. 

Among  the  builders  of  a  great  empire  in  the  Pacific  northwest  is  Harry  Clay 
Heermans,  who  has  been  a  potent  factor  in  the  development  of  Hoquiam,  Olympia, 
Raymond  and  other  sections  of  western  Washington.  Forceful  and  resourceful, 
he  accomplishes  what  he  undertakes  and  at  all  times  the  public  has  been  a  direct 
beneficiary  because  his  activities  have  been  of  a  character  that  have  had  to  do 
with  the  general  improvement  of  this  section  of  the  country.  He  was  born  in 
Fellowsville,  Preston  county,  West  Virginia,  June  3,  1852,  a  son  of  John  and  Nancy 
Heermans,  who  were  natives  of  Luzerne  county,  Pennsylvania.  The  name  of  Heer- 
mans is  of  Dutch  origin  and  the  ancestors,  leaving  their  native  Holland,  eriiigrated 
in  1657  to  New  Amsterdam,  now  New  York  city.  The  family  records  are  found 
in  the  books  of  the  old  Dutch  church.  In  the  maternal  line  H. C  Heermans  comes 
of  English  ancestry.  Liberally  educated,  he  was  graduated  at  the  Wesleyan  Uni- 
versity at  Middletown,  Connecticut,  in  1875  with  the  Bachelor  of  Arts  degree,  and 
the  Master  of  Arts  degree  was  conferred  upon  him  in  1878.  Thinking  to  make  the 
practice  of  law  his  life  work,  he  began  reading  in  the  office  of  Brown  &  Hadden 
of  Corning,  New  York,  but  after  a  time  turned  to  the  engineering  profession  and 
for  thirteen  years  acceptably  filled  the  responsible  position  of  city  engineer  in 
Corning.  He  next  purchased  the  waterworks  system  of  that  city  and  managed  the 
same  as  its  owner  for  thirty  years  prior  to  1908.  During  that  period  he  also 
engaged  extensively  in  real  estate  dealing  at  Corning  and  in  1886  formed  the 
Ontario  Land  Company,  with  headquarters  in  St.  Paul,  Minnesota.  In  1889  he 
arrived  in  Hoquiam  and  made  large  investments  for  the  Ontario  Land  Company 
and  eastern  capitalists,  and  at  once  allying  his  interests  with  those  of  the  city  and 
its  future  development,  he  constructed  in  1889  an  electric  light  plant  in  Hoquiam. 
From  that  point  forward  he  has  been  one  of  the  most  active  factors  in  the  develop- 
ment of  business  interests  which  have  had  marked  effect  upon  the  welfare  and 
progress  of  the  community.  In  1898  he  was  the  active  agent  in  securing  the  exten- 
sion of  the  Northern  Pacific  Railway  into  Hoquiam  and  constructed  the  Hoquiam 
waterworks  as  well  as  secured  the  establishment  of  several  new  industries  in  the 
city.  Something  of  the  breadth,  scope  and  importance  of  his  activities  through  the 
intervening  years  is  indicated  in  the  fact  that  at  the  present  time,  1916,  he  is  presi- 
dent and  manager  of  the  Hoquiam  Water  Company,  president  of  the  East  Hoquiam 
Company,  president  of  the  Grays  Harbor  Company,  president  of  the  Ontario  Land 
Company  and  vice  president  of  the  Harbor  Land  Company.  With  the  exception 
of  the  first  named,  all  these  companies  are  operating  in  real  estate.  In  1905  he 
purchased  the  controlling  interest  in  the  Olympia  Waterworks  at  Olympia,  Wash- 
ington, and  remained  at  the  head  of  the  system  until  191 6,  when  he  sold  out  to  the 
city.  He  also  has  been  president  of  the  Raymond  Land  &  Improvement  Company 
since  1905.  promoting  the  town  site  of  Raymond,  W^ashington,  and  he  is  a  director 
of  the  First  National  Bank  of  Hoquiam.     It  was  in  1908  that  he  removed  from 


HARRY  C.  HEERMANS 


•HE   NEW   YORK 
PUBLIC  UBRAHY 

ASTOii,    LENOX 
_l^ffEN  FOUNDATION 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  13 

Corning,  New  York,  to  Hoqtiiam  and  in  1909  he  established  his  home  in  Olympia 
but  has  devoted  most  of  the  time  to  the  development  of  Hoquiam  since  1898. 

On  the  17th  of  March,  1886,  at  Painted  Post,  New  York,  Mr.  Heermans  was 
united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Annie  L.  Townsend,  a  daughter  of  E.  E.  Townsend,  of 
Erwin,  Steuben  county.  New  York,  and  a  great-granddaughter  of  Colonel  E.  E. 
Erwin  of  Revolutionary  war  fame,  who  was  the  original  pioneer  and  owner  of  the 
town  of  Erwin.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Heermans  have  become  parents  of  four  children: 
Ruth,  the  wife  of  Milton  J.  Beaty,  now  residing  in  Warren,  Pennsylvania;  Joseph 
F.,  who  was  graduated  with  the  class  of  1916  from  the  University  of  Washington 
and  Jerome  T.  and  Donald,  students  in  that  school. 

The  parents  are  members  of  the  Presbyterian  church  and  Mr.  Heermans 
belongs  to  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks  at  Hoquiam.  His  political 
allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican  party  and  with  the  vital  questions  and  issues 
of  the  day  he  is  thoroughly  familiar,  but  he  does  not  seek  nor  desire  ofifice,  pre- 
ferring to  concentrate  his  energies  upon  his  business  affairs,  which  have  been  care- 
fully managed  and  wisely  planned.  He  readily  discriminates  between  the  essential 
and  the  nonessential  in  business  matters  and  Hoquiam  and  other  sections  of  the 
state  have  profited  largely  by  his  cooperation  in  the  work  of  promoting  public 
progress. 


GEORGE  FREDERICK  FRYE. 

George  Frederick  Frye  was  one  of  the  leading  business  men  of  Seattle  and 
erected  many  buildings  of  iriiportance,  including  the  Hotel  Frye,  which  is  con- 
ceded to  be  the  finest  hostelry  in  .the  city.  A  native  of  Germany,  he  was  born 
near  Hanover,  on  the  15th  of  June,  1833.  and  his  parents,  Otto  and  Sophia 
(Pranga)  Frye,  were  also  natives  of  the  fatherland.  Their  religious  faith  was 
that  of  the  Lutheran  church. 

In  1849,  when  sixteen  years  of  age,  George  F.  Frye  emigrated  to  the  United 
States  and  first  located  in  Lafayette,  Missouri,  where  he  worked  as  a  farm  hand. 
In  1852  he  worked  his  way  across  the  plains  to  the  Pacific  coast  with  the  Hays 
Company,  which  made  the  trip  with  ox  teams.  Fie  spent  one  winter  at  Portland 
and  was  for  some  time  in  the  employ  of  Hillory  Butler,  for  whom  the  Hotel 
Butler  was  named.  In  1853  he  came  to  Seattle,  which  was  then  a  small  settle- 
ment on  the  Sound.  In  connection  with  Arthur  A.  Denny  and  H.  L.  Yesler, 
Mr.  Frye  built  the  first  sawmill  and  the  first  grist  mill  in  Seattle  and  for  about 
ten  years  he  was  connected  with  milling  interests.  He  established  the  first  meat 
market  in  the  city  and  also  started  a  bakery.  Later  he  turned  his  attention  to 
steamboating  and  for  four  years  was  master  of  the  J.  B.  Libby,  one  of  the  early 
Sound  steamers.  He  was  also  mail  agent,  carrying  the  mail  from  Seattle  to 
Whatcom  on  the  Sameyami,  making  one  trip  a  week.  In  1884  he  erected  the 
Frye  Opera  House,  which  was  the  first  place  of  the  kind  erected  in  Seattle,  and 
as  manager  of  the  same  secured  good  theatrical  attractions  for  the  city.  In  the 
fire  of  1889  the  building  was  destroyed  and  Mr.  Frye  later  erected  the  Stevens 
Hotel  on  the  site  of  the  opera  house.  In  connection  with  A.  A.  Denny  he  also 
owned  the  Northern  Hotel,  and  he  likewise  erected  the  Barker  Hotel.     He  also 


14  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

built  the  Hotel  Frye,  in  which  the  city  takes  justifiable  pride.  He  personally 
supervised  the  construction  of  this  eleven-story  building  and  spared  no  expense 
nor  effort  in  making  it  one  of  the  best  equipped  and  most  complete  hostelries  of 
the  northwest.  In  addition  to  his  other  activities  he  dealt  extensively  in  real 
estate  and  was  one  of  the  wealthy  men  of  Seattle. 

On  the  25th  of  October,  i860,  Mr.  Frye  was  married  in  Seattle  to  Miss 
Louisa  C.  Denny,  a  daughter  of  A.  A.  Denny,  previously  mentioned,  who  was  one 
of  the  first  settlers  of  Seattle  and  a  man  of  great  influence  and  high  reputation. 
He  was  rightfully  given  the  title  of  "father  of  the  town."  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Frye 
were  bom  six  children :  James  ^Marion,  who  died  in  1905 ;  Mary  Louisa,  the 
widow  of  Captain  George  H.  Fortson;  Sophia  S.,  now  Mrs.  Daniel  W.  Bass; 
George  Arthur,  who  died  in  1892;  Roberta  G.,  now  Mrs.  P.  H.  Watt;  and  Eliza- 
beth, the  wife  of  Virgil  N.  Bogue. 

Mr.  Frye  cast  his  ballot  in  support  of  the  republican  party  and  served  accept- 
ably as  a  member  of  the  city  council.  His  religious  allegiance  was  given  to 
the  Lutheran  church  and  its  teachings  formed  the  guiding  principles  of  his  life. 
He  was  a  man  of  great  vigor  and  energy  and  was  very  active  in  business  affairs. 
He  aided  in  the  development  of  many  enterprises  and  among  the  other  things 
he  founded  the  first  brass  band  in  the  city.  He  was  one  of  the  leaders  among 
the  early  residents  of  the  city  and  as  Seattle  developed  his  grasp  of  affairs  seemed 
to  grow  accordingly,  and  he  continued  to  occupy  a  position  of  importance  in  the 
life  of  his  community.  He  almost  reached  the  age  of  seventy-nine  years,  passing 
away  on  the  2d  of  May,  1912. 


HON.  ALLEN  WEIR. 


Hon.  Allen  Weir,  of  Olympia,  was  thoroughly  western  in  spirit  and  inter- 
ests, his  entire  life  having  been  passed  on  the  Pacific  coast,  where  through  his 
business  ability  and  public  spirit  he  contributed  in  substantial  measure  to  the 
wonderful  development  and  progress  of  this  section  of  the  country.  He  was 
born  in  El  Monte.  Los  Angeles  county.  California,  April  24,  1854,  and  when 
six  years  of  age  was  brought  to  Washington  by  his  parents,  who  reached  Port 
Townsend  on  the  28th  of  May,  i860.  He  was  a  son  of  John  and  Saluda  J. 
(Buchanan)  Weir.  The  father,  a  native  of  Missouri,  was  at  dift'erent  times, 
a  pioneer  of  that  state,  of  Texas,  of  California  and  of  the  Puget  Sound  country. 
Removing  to  the  Lone  Star  state,  he  there  married  Miss  Buchanan  and  their 
three  oldest  children  were  born  in  Texas.  In  1853  they  started  by  wagon  across 
the  plains  for  southern  California  and  were  about  a  year  in  making  the  trip. 
The  father  engaged  in  blacksmithing  and  farming  at  Lexington,  Los  Angeles 
county,  California,  and  in  1858  he  made  his  way  northward  to  Port  Townsend 
and  then  to  Dungeness,  where  two  years  later  he  was  joined  by  his  family.  He 
settled  two  miles  from  the  straits,  where  he  took  up  government  land  and 
developed  a  farm,  residing  thereon  until  his  demise.  He  cleared  all  his  land, 
made  all  his  own  roads  and  also  made  the  first  plow  in  the  county.  He  likewise 
built  the  first  wagon  in  the  county  and  he  continued  to  engage  in  blacksmithing 
.as  w^U  as  in  general  farming.     He  possessed  expert  mechanical  ingenuity  and 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  15 

could  make  anything  out  of  wood  and  iron.  He  lived  to  be  sixty-three  years 
of  age  and  his  wife,  who  survived  him  for  about  twelve  years,  had  reached  the 
age  of  seventy  at  the  time  of  her  demise.  In  their  family  were  the  following 
named:  Marion,  deceased;  Mrs.  Laura  B.  Troy,  of  Olympia;  Mrs.  Susan  L. 
Evans,  of  Dungeness,  Washington;  Allen,  of  this  review;  Mrs.  Martha  J.  Whit- 
tier,  who  has  passed  away ;  and  Julia,  the  widow  of  Charles  Kennard,  of  Tacoma. 

Allen  Weir  attended  school  in  Olympia  but  is  largely  a  self-educated  man 
and  has  gained  many  of  his  most  valuable  lessons  in  the  school  of  experience. 
In  'his  boyhood  he  was  thrown  in  close  relations  with  the  Clallam  Indians,  who 
were  numerous  and  often  worked  on  his  father's  farm.  Taking  an  interest  in 
their  language,  he  soon  mastered  it,  and  this  ability  to  speak  the  Chinook  language 
was  of  great  value  to  him  later  in  his  legal  practice  as  it  enabled  him  to  be  his 
own  interpreter.  When  nineteen  years  of  age  he  started  in  business  on  his  own 
account  by  renting  land  of  his  father,  on  which  he  engaged  in  the  cultivation  of 
crops  and  in  raising  hogs.  He  afterward  spent  two  years  in  driving  ox  teams 
in  logging  camps  but,  desirous  of  improving  his  education,  he  then  went  to 
Olympia  and  spent  two  years  in  the  Olympia  Collegiate  Institute,  where  Pro- 
fessor Royal  took  a  great  interest  in  him  and  assisted  him  as  far  as  possible. 
While  pursuing  his  studies  Mr.  Weir  did  his  own  cooking  and  worked  as  janitor 
of  the  building  in  order  to  pay  his  tuition.  He  kept  ahead  of  his  class,  and  left 
some  time  before  his  class  was  graduated,  he  having  completed  the  course.  It 
is  a  well  known  fact  that  it  is  under  the  stimulus  of  necessity  and  the  pressure 
of  adversity  that  the  best  and  strongest  in  man  are  brought  out  and  developed 
and  Mr.  Weir  thus  early  displayed  the  elemental  strength  and  force  of  his  char- 
acter. 

Returning  to  Port  Townsend,  he  purchased  the  Puget  Sound  Argus,  a  small 
weekly  newspaper,  which  also  did  job  work.  About  six  months  later,  or  in  No- 
vember, 1877,  he  was  married  and  his  wife  became  his  active  assistant  in  the 
business.  Together  they  built  up  the  paper,  largely  increasing  its  circulation 
and  its  advertising  patronage,  and  after  twelve  years  they  sold  the  business  at  a 
good  profit.  Not  long  after  they  began  the  publication  of  the  paper  a  daily  edi- 
tion was  started.  Mr.  Weir  had  had  no  practical  experience  as  a  newspaper 
man  but  he  applied  himself  thoroughly  to  learning  the  business  and  soon  proved 
his  capability  therein.  After  disposing  of  the  Argus  the  Commercial  Club  of 
Port  Townsend  ofiPered  him  ten  thousand  dollars  if  he  would  return  and  again 
enter  the  newspaper  business  there.  He  had  served  as  secretary  of  the  cham- 
ber of  commerce  and  in  both  connections  had  much  to  do  with  the  upbuilding 
of  the  town,  the  development  of  its  interests  and  the  exploitation  of  its  resources. 
In  fact  he  took  an  active  part  in  shaping  the  history  of  the  state  in  consider- 
able measure  and  in  the  spring  of  i88g  was  elected  a  member  of  the  constitutional 
convention  which  met  at  Olympia.  He  took  part  in  various  debates  of  the 
convention  and  did  much  toward  framing  the  organic  law  of  the  state.  The 
same  year  he  was  nommated  for  secretary  of  state  and  was  the  first  to  hold 
that  office  after  the  admission  of  Washington  to  the  Union.  He  proved  a  capable 
official  but  did  not  become  a  candidate  for  reelection.  He  had  previously  served 
as  clerk  in  the  upper  house  of  the  territorial  legislature  in  1887  ^"d  i'^  many 
ways  he  aided  in  forming  public  policy.  He  was  a  great  friend  of  Governor 
Terry  and  many  other  distinguished  statesmen  of  Washington  and  in  their  coun- 


16  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

cils  his  opinions  many  times  carried  great  weight.  He  was  well  fitted  for 
leadership  by  reason  of  his  keen  mind  and  his  natural  oratorical  powers,  which 
had  been  developed  while  he  was  a  member  of  a  literary  society  in  school.  He 
became  a  pronounced  advocate  of  the  temperance  cause  and  in  this,  as  in  every 
other  public  question,  he  studied  every  phase  of  the  problem  and  his  utterances 
were  based  upon  thorough  knowledge.  For  three  terms  he  held  the  office  of 
president  of  the  Olympia  Chamber  of  Commerce.  After  retiring  from  the  ofiice 
of  secretary  of  state  he  entered  upon  the  practice  of  law  in  Olympia.  having 
been  admitted  to  the  bar  in  1892  upon  examination  before  the  United 
States  supreme  court,  having  the  distinction  of  being  the  first  one  thus 
admitted.  He  was  always  alone  in  his  law  practice,  which  became  extensive 
and  of  a  very  important  character.  He  made  a  specialty  of  handling  tide  land 
litigation  and  is  a  recognized  authority  on  tide  land  law.  Years  before  when 
he  was  filling  the  office  of  justice  of  the  peace  at  Port  Townsend  he  rendered 
decisions  in  tide  land  cases  which  were  accepted  by  the  state  courts  and  are  still 
quoted  in  the  trial  of  such  cases.  He  continued  actively  in  practice  until  Sep- 
tember, IQ15,  when  ill  health  forced  his  retirement. 

On  the  I2th  of  November,  1877,  in  Dungeness,  Mr.  Weir  was  married  to 
Aliss  Ellen  Davis,  a  daughter  of  Hall  Davis,  who  came  from  Ontario,  Canada, 
in  1873  and  was  one  of  the  leading  dairymen  of  Washington.  He  developed  a 
fine  farm  as  well  as  a  splendid  dairy  herd  and  his  business  afifairs  were  most 
wisely,  carefully  and  successfully  managed.  While  he  made  his  home  at  Dun- 
geness his  death  occurred  in  Seattle.  The  surviving  children  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Weir  are  two  sons  and  a  daughter:  Eva,  who  wedded  \\'.  R.  ^^'hite.  of  Olympia, 
and  has  three  children.  Allen  C,  Elizabeth  and  ^lary-Ellen ;  Frank  A.,  who  mar- 
ried Minnie  Huwald  and  is  now  county  engineer  of  Thurston  county;  and  Royal 
F..  a  lumberman  of  Hoquiam.     Two  other  children  died  when  young. 

Mr.  Weir  was  long  a  devoted  and  faithful  member  of  the  Methodist  Epis- 
copal church,  in  which  he  held  every  lay  office.  'Sirs.  Weir  is  also  a  member  of 
that  church.  From  1877  until  his  death  he  was  identified  with  the  Ancient  Order 
of  United  Workmen.  The  breadth  of  his  interests  is  further  indicated  in  the 
fact  that  he  served  as  regent  of  the  Territorial  University.  His  political  alle- 
giance was  always  unfalteringly  given  to  the  republican  party.  Before  he  was 
twenty-one  years  of  age  he  was  nominated  by  a  democratic  committee  for  a  seat 
in  the  territorial  legislature,  but  when  the  committee  waited  upon  him  to  tell 
him  of  their  choice  he  replied  that  he  could  not  accept  as  he  was  a 
republican.  He  did  much  campaign  work  and  in  1896  delivered  campaign 
addresses  throughout  Washington,  Oregon,  Montana  and  Idaho.  There 
is  something  stimulating  in  the  life  history  of  such  a  man.  One  responds 
to  the  story  with  a  thrill,  recognizing  how  successfully  he  battled  with 
untoward  circumstances  and  wrested  fortune  and  prominence  from  the 
hands  of  fate.  His  expanding  powers  brought  him  prominently  before  the  public 
and  his  history  proves  that  merit  and  ability  will  come  to  the  front.  Prompted 
by  a  laudable  ambition  to  be  something  more  than  a  common  laborer  and  realiz- 
ing that  the  fundamental  step  toward  this  end  was  the  acquirement  of  an  edu- 
cation, he  developed  the  studious  habits  which  remained  his  through  life  and 
which  made  him  the  peer  of  the  ablest  men  of  the  northwest. 

In  September,  191 5.  he  suffered  a  stroke  of  paralysis,  from  which,  however 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  17 

he  almost  completely  recovered.  On  the  17th  of  August,  1916,  while  he  and  his 
wife  were  visiting  at  Port  Townsend  they  took  a  drive  with  S.  Troy  and  from 
some  unknown  cause  the  car  ran  off  the  dock  into  the  strait.  Mr.  Troy  was 
killed  instantly,  Mrs.  Weir  was  thrown  clear  of  the  car  and  escaped  with 
bruises  and  Mr.  Weir  received  such  a  severe  shock  and  was  so  bruised  that  he 
began  to  fail  rapidly  in  health  and  passed  away  on  the  31st  of  October,  1916, 
at  the  hospital  in  Port  Townsend.  Mrs.  Weir  has  since  lived  in  Olympia  at  the 
home  of  her  daughter,  Mrs.  W^hite. 


JONATHAN  JAMES  BISHOP. 

Prominent  among  Jefferson  county's  native  sons  is  Jonathan  James  Bishop, 
now  serving  as  county  clerk.  He  was  born  in  Chimacum,  May  9,  1870,  and  is 
a  son  of  William  and  Hannah  (Hutchinson)  Bishop,  natives  of  England  and 
Scotland  respectively.  In  early  life  the  father  joined  the  English  navy  and 
served  in  the  Crimean  war.  On  one  of  his  trips  to  America  he  resigned  on 
reaching  Victoria  and  in  1855  became  a  resident  of  Washington,  where  he  fol- 
lowed farming  to  1890,  when  he  retired.  Here  he  died  in  1906,  at  the  age  of 
seventy-two  years.  The  mother  of  our  subject  was  reared  and  educated  in 
Scotland  and  Ireland  and  she,  too,  became  an  early  settler  of  Washington,  being 
married  in  Chimacum,  January  14,  1868.  She  passed  away  in  1902,  at  the  age 
of  sixty-five  years.  In  the  family  were  seven  children,  namely:  Thomas  G. ; 
William;  Mrs.  Elizabeth  A'an  Trojen,  deceased;  A.  A.;  Jonathan  James;  Anna 
M.  Hinde;  and  Amelia  Bugge. 

During  his  boyhood  Jonathan  James  Bishop  attended  the  public  schools  of 
Chimacum,  pursuing  his  studied  under  one  teacher  for  ten  years.  He  then 
worked  on  a  ranch  for  several  years  and  afterward  pursued  a  normal  course 
at  Coupeville,  Washington,  graduating  in  1892.  The  following  year  was  de- 
voted to  teaching  in  Chimacum  and  at  the  end  of  that  time  he  entered  the  law 
department  of  the  University  of  Michigan,  from  which  he  was  graduated  with 
the  LL.B.  degree  in  1895.  Returning  to  Washington,  he  located  at  Port  Town- 
send,  where  he  was  engaged  in  practice  for  a  short  time  but  in  1914  was  elected 
county  clerk  and  has  since  filled  that  office  with  credit  to  himself  and  to  the 
entire  satisfaction  of  his  constituents. 

On  the  2ist  of  September,  1896,  near  Ladner,  British  Columbia,  Mr.  Bishop 
was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Pauline  J.  Chase,  a  daughter  of  John  and  Mary 
E.  (Haskins)  Chase,  who  at  one  time  were  well  known  citzens  of  Coupeville, 
Washington.  The  father  is  now  deceased,  but  the  mother  is  still  living  and 
makes  her  home  with  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bishop.  Our  subject  and  his  wife  have  six 
children,  namely:  Florence,  born  in  Port  Townsend,  June  8,  1897;  Maizie,  who 
was  born  September  15,  1899,  and  is  now  attending  the  State  School  for 
Defective  Youth  at  Medical  Lake;  Prentiss  C,  who  was  born  January  13,  1902, 
and  is  attending  high  school  in  Port  Townsend;  Myron  J.,  born  August  2,  1905, 
and  Wilbert  R.,  born  July  30,  1910,  both  in  school  at  Port  Townsend;  and  Vinton 
Chase,  born  November  3,  1916. 

Mr.  Bishop  is  probably  one  of  the  best  known  county  ofiicials  in  Jefferson 


18  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

county  and  he  enjoys  the  confidence  and  respect  of  the  entire  community.  He 
has  filled  the  office  of  notary  public  and  by  his  ballot  always  supports  the  men 
and  measures  of  the  rejniblican  party.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Native  Sons  of 
Washington,  the  Woodmen  of  the  World  and  the  Women  of  Woodcraft. 


FRANCIS  W.  BROOKS. 

Francis  W.  Brooks  was  born  in  Burlington,  Iowa,  March  27,  1862,  the 
son  of  Francis  W.  Brooks,  a  native  of  New  York,  who  went  to  Iowa  in  1840, 
established  the  first  bank  in  that  state  at  Burlington  and  there  continued  in  the 
banking  business  up  to  the  time  of  his  death  in  1869.  Francis  W.  Brooks,  Sr., 
was  married  to  Harriet  C.  Beach,  a  native  of  New  York.  She  died  in  Burlington 
in  her  seventy-sixth  year  in  1910. 

Francis  W.  Brooks,  the  son,  was  educated  at  Lawrenceville  and  in  1879 
entered  the  employ  of  the  Union  National  Bank  of  Chicago.  He  later  removed 
to  Aberdeen,  South  Dakota,  where  he  was  associated  with  J.  Q.  A.  Braden  and 
John  T.  McChesney  in  the  Brown  County  Bank  and  later  was  cashier  of  the 
Aberdeen  National  Bank. 

In  1900  Mr.  Brooks  removed  to  Everett  where,  in  connection  with  Messrs. 
Tenant  and  Bickelhaupt,  he  built  the  Everett  Flour  Mill  and  was  actively  identi- 
fied in  the  management  and  operation  of  this  plant  for  two  years,  until  its  sale 
to  other  interests.  He  then  entered  the  American  National  Bank,  and  later  the 
Everett  Trust  &  Savings  Bank,  in  which  he  held  the  position  of  Cashier  from  its 
inception  up  to  the  time  of  his  death.  August  2'j,  1916.  He  was  a  courteous  and 
obliging  official  and  his  comprehensive  knowledge  of  the  banking  business  and 
his  marked  ability  in  this  direction  contributed  in  a  large  measure  to  the  success 
of  the  institution. 

In  1887  in  Burlington,  Iowa.  Mr.  Brooks  was  married  to  Miss  Jessie  L.  Hay- 
Jen,  daughter  of  William  F.  and  Susan  Hayden,  who  were  early  settlers  in  Bur- 
lington. He  was  treasurer  of  the  Everett  Golf  and  Countr}^  Club  and  president 
of  the  Cascade  Club.  He  is  survived  by  his  widow  and  one  daughter,  Mrs.  Don- 
ald C.  Barnes. 


OLAF  CARLSON. 


Olaf  Carlson,  president  of  the  C-B  Lumber  &  Shingle  Company  and  a  director 
of  the  Citizens  Bank  &  Trust  Company  of  Everett,  was  born  in  Gottenburg. 
Sweden,  on  the  30th  of  November,  i860.  His  father.  Carl  Elis  Anderson,  also 
a  native  of  that  country,  was  a  sea  captain  throughout  his  entire  life  and  passed 
away  in  Sweden  in  1870,  at  the  age  of  forty-eight  years.  The  mother,  Mrs. 
Justina  Anderson,  died  in  Sweden  about  1880.  Of  the  six  children  of  the  family 
one  passed  away  in  infancy,  while  three  are  yet  living. 

Olaf  Carlson,  who  was  the  fourth  in  order  of  birth,  pursued  his  education 
in  the  schools  of  his  native  country  to  the  age  of  eighteen  years  and  in   1881 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  19 

came  to  the  new  world,  making  his  way  at  once  to  Portland,  Oregon,  where  he 
arrived  with  a  cash  capital  of  eighty  dollars,  but  this  was  stolen  from  him  in  a 
hotel  during  his  first  week's  stay  there.  He  secured  employment  at  gardening 
for  C.  A.  Prescott  at  a  wage  of  twenty-five  dollars  per  month  and  board.  His 
residence  in  Washington  dates  from  the  spring  of  1887,  at  which  time  he  located 
in  Tacoma,  where  with  his  two  brothers,  August  and  David  Carlson,  and  his 
two  cousins,  Andrew  Johnson  and  Carl  Johnson,  he  entered  the  sawmill  busi- 
ness, which  they  successfully  conducted  for  ten  years  and  at  the  same  time 
engaged  in  the  manufacture  of  shingles.  Later  Olaf  Carlson  purchased  a  half 
interest  in  the  Young  Lumber  Company,  shingle  manufacturers  of  Tacoma,  at 
which  time  the  name  was  changed  to  Carlson  Brothers.  After  the  destruction 
of  the  plant  by  fire  they  erected  the  first  upright  shingle  mill  on  the  coast  and 
they  were  obliged  to  send  to  California  to  secure  men  experienced  in  the  opera- 
tion of  such  a  mill.  Theirs  was  also  the  first  mill  to  operate  without  a  knee 
bolter,  cutting  the  raw  timber,  which  method  is  now  universal.  In  Tacoma  they 
built  a  large  lumber  mill,  cutting  eighty  thousand  feet  per  day.  After  conduct- 
ing that  mill  for  four  years  they  sold  out  and  the  Carlson  Brothers  became 
connected  with  E.  G.  McNeely  &  Company  of  Tacoma  in  the  operation  of  their 
plant  at  Everett.  After  two  years  the  business  was  burned  down,  at  the  end  of 
which  time  Mr.  Carlson  purchased  the  interest  of  Mr.  McNeely  in  the  business 
and  established  an  upright  shingle  mill  on  the  old  property.  This  he  continued 
to  operate  until  191 2,  when  he  sold  the  plant  to  the  Shull  Lumber  Company. 
He  then  took  a  trip  to  Europe,  visiting  his  old  home  and  the  principal  countries 
on  the  continent. 

Upon  his  return  to  the  new  world  he  became  associated  with  lumber  inter- 
ests as  the  head  of  the  C-B  Lumber  &  Shingle  Company,  Incorporated,  at  Everett, 
of  which  he  is  the  president,  with  W.  R.  Cunningham,  Jr.,  as  vice  president  and 
George  A.  Bergstrom  as  secretary  and  treasurer.  The  business  was  originally 
established  in  1909  south  of  Monroe,  on  the  Snocjualmie  river,  by  his  two  part- 
ners, who  engaged  in  the  manufacture  of  shingles  under  the  name  of  the  C-B 
Shingle  Company,  Incorporated.  The  plant  embraced  a  six-machine  mill  and 
employment  was  originally  given  to  thirty  people,  while  the  average  output  was 
two  hundred  and  twenty-five  thousand  feet  per  day.  The  business  was  con- 
ducted at  Monroe  until  1914,  when  the  company  was  reorganized  and  a  removal 
was  made  to  Everett,  a  location  being  secured  on  the  tide  flats  at  Ninth  and 
Bayside.  The  capacity  was  increased  to  a  ten-machine  mill,  with  an  output  of 
four  hundred  thousand  feet,  and  Mr.  Carlson  became  identified  with  the  new 
organization,  of  which  he  was  elected  president.  This  was  the  first  completely 
electrically  driven  shingle  mill  in  the  world.  The  present  plant  covers  twenty 
acres  and  employment  is  furnished  to  forty-five  men,  while  the  manufactured 
product  is  being  shipped  to  all  parts  of  the  world.  Another  important  feature 
of  the  plant  and  one  which  is  the  company's  own  design  is  a  blower  system, 
resulting  in  the  separation  of  the  fine  and  coarse  dust  and  thereby  increasing 
the  efficiency  of  the  men.  In  fact  theirs  is  the  most  modern  mill  equipment  of 
the  kind  in  the  world.  The  machinery  is  of  the  very  latest  design,  embracing  all 
of  the  most  modern  improvements,  their  business  largely  setting  the  standard 
of  progressiveness  in  their  field.  Mr.  Bergstrom,  who  is  the  secretary  and  treas- 
urer, is  also  president  of  the  Mukilteo  Shingle  Company,  located  at  Mukilteo, 


20  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

Washington,  having  a  six-machine  plant,  and  he  is  the  secretary  and  treasurer 
of  the  Pacific  Timber  Company  of  Everett,  Washington.  It  will  thus  be  seen 
that  the  partners  are  men  of  broad  experience  and  extensive  business  connec- 
tions. In  addition  to  his  lumber  interests  Mr.  Carlson  is  a  director  of  the 
Citizens  Bank  &  Trust  Company  of  Everett. 

On  the  13th  of  June,  1891,  in  Tacoma,  Mr.  Carlson  was  married  to  Miss 
Ellen  Caroline  Nelson,  a  native  of  Sweden  and  a  daughter  of  Gust  Nelson.  Their 
five  children  are:  Edward  W.,  who  is  associated  with  the  C-B  Lumber  &  Shin- 
gle Company  as  stenographer ;  Nettie  E. ;  Esther  Alma ;  Evelyn,  and  Julia  C. 
The  family  residence  at  No.  1722  Rucker  avenue  is  one  of  the  finest  homes  in 
:he  city  and  stands  on  the  best  improved  block  in  Everett. 

Politically  ]\Ir.  Carlson  is  a  republican  where  national  issues  are  involved 
but  casts  an  independent  local  ballot.  In  191 1  he  was  elected  a  member  of  the 
city  council,  but  six  months  later  the  commission  form  of  government  w^as  voted 
in  and  thus  his  term  was  brought  to  a  close.  He  belongs  to  the  Commercial 
Club  and  is  at  all  times  in  sympathy  with  its  progressive  movements  for  the 
upbuilding  of  the  city,  the  extension  of  its  trade  relations  and  the  establishment 
of  higher  civic  standards.  He  belongs  to  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  America 
and  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  his  religious  faith  is  that  of 
the  Lutheran  church.  He  has  justly  won  the  proud  American  title  of  a  self- 
made  man.  for  his  success  is  attributable  entirely  to  his  own  efiforts,  perseverance 
and  capability.  A  thoughtful  review  of  his  life  record  will  clearly  indicate  the 
fact  that  he  has  always  been  foremost  in  the  adoption  of  methods  to  improve 
his  business,  taking  an  initiative  step  along  many  lines.  In  fact  he  has  ever 
been  a  leader,  not  a  follower,  and  his  orderly  progression  has  brought  him  to 
a  place  of  distinction  and  of  success. 


CHARLES  XAVIER  LARRABEE. 

The  specific  and  distinctive  office  of  biography  is  not  to  give  voice  to  a  man's 
modest  estimate  of  himself  and  his  accomplishments  but  rather  to  leave  a  per- 
petual record  establishing  his  character  by  the  consensus  of  opinion  on  the  part 
of  his  fellowmen.  Throughout  r>ellingham  and  throughout  Washington  Charles 
Xavier  Larrabee  is  spoken  of  in  terms  of  admiration  and  respect.  His  life  was 
so  varied  in  its  activity,  so  honorable  in  its  purposes,  so  far-reaching  and  bene- 
ficial in  its  effects  that  it  became  an  integral  part  of  the  history  of  his  city  and 
left  its  impress  upon  the  annals  of  the  state.  He  was  in  no  sense  a  man  in  public 
life,  in  fact  he  shunned  notoriety  and  publicity,  but  nevertheless  he  exerted  an 
immeasurable  influence  on  the  city  of  his  residence  in  relation  to  its  material, 
intellectual  and  moral  progress,  and  Bellingham's  history  without  his  life  record 
would  be  as  the  story  of  Hamlet  with  the  leading  character  omitted. 

Born  in  Portville,  Cattaraugus  county.  New  York,  on  the  19th  of  November, 
1843,  ^le  was  the  son  of  a  merchant,  who  about  1850  removed  with  his  family 
to  Wisconsin,  where  his  death  occurred  when  his  two  sons,  S.  E.  and  C.  X. 
Larrabee,  were  but  young  lads.  They  inherited  from  their  father  no  patrimony 
but  an  honorable  name.     They  had  been  students  in  the  village  school  at  Amro, 


CHARLES  X.  LARRABEE 


.;.  TH-E  NEW  YORK 
PUBLIC  UBRARY 


ASTOR,    LENOX 
Tfl-DEN   FOUNDATION 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  23 

and  had  mastered  little  more  than  the  rudiments  of  a  common  school  educa- 
tion when  the  necessity  of  providing  for  their  own  support  and  that  of  their 
widowed  mother  devolved  upon  them.  The  mother,  however,  encouraged  the 
boys  to  make  every  possible  advance  along  educational  lines,  so  that  when  still 
in  his  teens,  or  in  1862,  at  the  age  of  nineteen,  Charles  X.  Larrabee  had  quali- 
fied for  teaching  and  secured  a  school,  devoting  four  winter  terms  to  that  pro- 
fession. He  felt  that  he  owed  a  duty  to  his  country,  then  engaged  in  civil  war, 
but  a  still  greater  duty  to  his  widowed  mother.  All  of  his  hard-earned  savings 
he  gave  to  a  substitute,  who  represented  him  at  the  front,  and  he  started  anew 
to  earn  a  living.  Throughout  the  years  of  his  early  manhood  he  faced  hard- 
ships and  difficulties  but  they  seemed  only  to  call  forth  greater  courage  and 
determination  on  his  part.  He  used  his  opportunities  wisely  and  well,  recog- 
nizing at  the  outset  that  he  must  depend  entirely  upon  his  own  resources  and 
that  he  must  take  advantage  of  every  chance.  He  left  Wisconsin  for  Montana 
in  1875  and  in  that  state  turned  his  attention  to  ranching  and  mining,  his  close 
application  and  clarity  of  vision  in  business  matters  soon  gaining  for  him  a  sub- 
stantial measure  of  success  that  placed  him  in  a  position  of  leadership  in  the 
lines  of  business  in  which  he  was  engaged.  He  sank  the  shaft  of  the  famous 
Anaconda  mine  forty  feet  for  a  half  interest  in  the  mine  and  after  selling  that 
property  he  located  and  developed  the  St.  Lawrence  mine,  which  he  later  sold. 
His  greatest  achievement  in  mining  was  the  discovery  and  development  of  the 
Mountain  View  copper  mine  at  Butte  City. 

In  1887,  after  a  residence  of  twelve  years  in  Montana,  he  disposed  of  the 
greater  part  of  his  mining  interests  in  that'  feta'te -bui  retained  the  ownership  of 
his  extensive  cattle  and  horse  ranch.  At  that  da:te  he  removed  to  Portland, 
Oregon,  where  in  connection  with  his  brother  he  purchased  the  HoUaday  estate, 
a  part  of  which  lay  within  the  corporation  limits,  of  Portland,  on  the  east  bank 
of  the  Willamette  river.  About  the  same  time  he  became  the  owner  of  a  large 
interest  in  the  Fairhaven  Land  Company.  His  residence  on  Bellingham  bay 
dated  from  1890  and  from  that  time  forward  until  his  death  almost  a  quarter 
of  a  century  later  he  was  closely  associated  with  many  of  the  business  interests 
which  have  led  to  the  substantial  development  and  progress  of  the  city.  He  was 
one  of  the  builders  of  the  Fairhaven  &  Southern  Railroad  and  became  vice 
president  of  the  company,  while  later  he  was  elected  president.  He  owned  a 
majority  of  the  stock  but  eventually  sold  the  road  to  the  Great  Northern  Com- 
pany. He  continued  his  business  connections  through  investments  in  Montana, 
Oregon  and  Washington.  He  was  at  one  time  part  owner  of  the  Bellingham 
Herald  and  was  ever  one  of  its  stanchest  supporters  when  financial  aid  was 
needed.  He  became  the  possessor  of  valuable  mining  and  ranch  property,  tim- 
ber lands  and  city  and  suburban  realty  in  the  three  states  mentioned  and  the 
wisdom  of  his  judgment  in  business  affairs  and  the  keenness  of  his  vision  were 
indicated  in  many  of  his  transactions,  particularly  in  his  purchase  of  the  Holla- 
day  estate,  which  became  the  very  center  of  the  east  side  residence  district  of 
Portland  and  increased  rapidly  in  value  with  the  substantial  growth  of  the  city. 
He  became  the  president  of  the  Oregon  Real  Estate  Company,  president  of  the 
Pacific  Realty  Company,  vice  president  of  the  Northwestern  National  Bank  and 
of  the  Northwestern  State  Bank,  and  he  was  the  owner  of  stock  in  many  other 
important  corporations,  in  which  he  would  accept  no  office. 


Vol.  II— 2 


24  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

In  1892,  in  St.  Louis,  Missouri,  Air.  Larrabee  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Miss  Frances  Payne  and  to  them  were  born  three  sons  and  a  daughter :  Charles 
Francis,  whose  advanced  studies  were  pursued  in  Reed  College  at  Portland; 
Edward  Payne;  Mary  Adele;  and  Benjamin  Howard. 

While  the  business  interests  of  Mr.  Larrabee  made  him  a  most  valued  factor 
in  various  communities,  he  did  not  feel  that  this  comprised  his  duty  to  his  home 
city  and  to  an  extent  far  greater  than  that  of  the  majority  of  men  he  aided  in 
the  upbuilding  of  Bellingham  and  its  interests.  A  local  paper  said :  "He  had 
been  most  lavish  in  his  liberal  provisions  and  donations,  actuated  by  keen- 
sighted  benevolence.  The  children  and  youth  especially  were  beneficiaries  in 
the  plans  of  his  past  philanthropies  and  those  which  he  was  contemplating  for 
the  future."  Just  a  few  weeks  before  his  death,  which  occurred  September  16, 
1914,  he  gave  in  the  name  of  his  wife  to  the  Young  Women's  Christian  Asso- 
ciation a  building  costing  forty  thousand  dollars  and  he  was  a  most  generous 
supporter  of  the  Young  Men's  Christian  Association.  He  contributed  liberally 
for  campaign  purposes  to  the  republican  party  and  was  regarded  as  one  of  its 
wise  counselors,  but  the  honors  and  emoluments  of  office  had  no  attraction  for 
him.  He  endorsed  all  those  purifying  and  wholesome  measures  and  reforms 
which  have  been  growing  up  in  the  political  life  of  the  country  and  which  today 
are  common  to  both  parties.  In  a  word,  while  never  seeking  to  occupy  a  posi- 
tion before  the  public  and  in  fact  shunning  publicity,  he  nevertheless  did  so 
great  a  work  for  Bellingham  and  the  state  that  his  name  has  become  an  integral 
part  of  its  history.  Because  of  the  innate  refinement  of  his  nature  he  opposed 
everything  common  and  the  universality  of  his  friendships  interprets  for  us  his 
intellectual  hospitality  and  the  breadth  of  his  sympathy,  for  nothing  was  foreign 
to  him  that  concerned  his  fellowmen. 


REV.  DANIEL  BAGLEY. 

Rev.  Daniel  Bagley  was  born  September  7,  1818,  in  Crawford  county,  Penn- 
sylvania, and  died  in  Seattle  April  26,  1905.  His  wife,  Susannah  Rogers 
Whipple,  was  born  in  Massachusetts,  May  8,  1819.  While  she  was  a  small 
child  her  parents  moved  into  western  Pennsylvania,  near  Meadville,  Crawford 
county.  This  was  then  a  rough  and  thinly  settled  region  and  they  grew  up 
amid  the  privations  and  hardships  of  pioneer  life.  Daniel  helped  his  father 
clear  the  original  forest  off  their  farm  and  shared  in  the  toil  that  was  incident 
to  cutting  a  home  out  of  lands  covered  with  a  dense  growth  of  hickory,  chestnut, 
birch,  maple,  etc. 

The  young  people  met  while  they  were  yet  in  their  teens  and  acquaintance 
soon  ripened  into  love,  and  August  15,  1840,  they  were  made  husband  and  wife. 
A  few  days  later  they  started  for  the  prairies  of  Illinois,  and  there  settled  on  a 
claim  near  Somanauk.  The  husband  farmed  and  taught  school  for  two  years, 
while  the  wife  performed  the  household  duties  of  their  small  and  primitive 
cabin. 

In  1842  Mr.  Bagley  was  admitted  into  the  ministry  of  the  Methodist  Protes- 
tant church,  and   for  ten  years  was  engaged   in  active  work,  nominally  being 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  25 

stationed  at  one  place  each  year,  but  in  reality  traveling  summer  and  winter  from 
the  south,  near  Springfield,  to  the  northern  boundaries  of  the  state.  Buffalo 
and  Indian  trails  then  gridironed  the  broad  and  thinly  settled  prairies,  and  were 
not  succeeded  by  the  iron  rails  of  the  early  railroads  of  the  state  until  1850 
and  the  decade  succeeding.  At  Princeton,  Bureau  county,  the  first  home  of  the 
still  young  couple  was  established,  and  here  Mr.  Bagley  was  an  active  worker 
in  the  anti-slavery  agitation  then  beginning  to  arouse  the  attention  and  con- 
science of  here  and  there  a  few  of  the  earnest  thinkers  of  the  day.  Owen 
Lovejoy's  and  Mr.  Bagley 's  churches  stood  within  a  few  yards  of  each  other, 
and  their  pastors  united  in  religious  and  philanthropical  work,  and  time  and 
again  were  their  anti-slavery  meetings  broken  up  by  the  pro-slavery  roughs  of 
the  day. 

During  the  closing  years  of  the  '40s  and  early  in  the  '50s  California  and 
Oregon  attracted  a  great  deal  of  attention,  and  the  more  enterprising  of  the 
younger  generation  began  the  westward  movement  that  has  for  sixty  years 
gone  on  in  an  ever  swelling  tide.  In  1852  Rev.  Daniel  Bagley  was  chosen  by 
the  board  of  missions  of  his  church  as  missionary  to  Oregon,  which  then  in- 
cluded the  present  states  of  Washington  and  Idaho  and  parts  of  Montana  and 
Wyoming. 

Their  wagon  train  left  Princeton,  Illinois,  April  20,  1852,  and  in  it  were 
Mr.  Bagley  and  family.  Dexter  Horton  and  family,  Thomas  Mercer  and  family, 
William  H.  Shoudy,  John  Pike  and  Aaron  Mercer  and  wife.  The  wives  of 
Thomas  and  Aaron  Mercer  never  reached  here,  but  the  others  all  came  to  Seattle 
at  some  period  to  make  their  home. 

Those  moving  to  the  Pacific  coast  that  year  were  an  army  in  numbers,  so 
that  the  danger  from  Indians  was  not  great,  but  the  hardships  and  sufferings  of 
the  emigrants  were  increased.  The  difficulties  of  securing  water  and  feed  for 
the  stock  were  great  and  cholera  became  epidemic.  However,  the  fifteen  or 
twenty  families  of  this  particular  train,  after  nearly  five  months  of  almost 
constant  travel,  arrived  at  The  Dalles,  on  the  Columbia  river,  without  the  loss 
of  one  of  their  number  and  with  practically  all  their  wagons  and  stock.  Here 
they  separated,  only  two  or  three  families  accompanying  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bagley 
to  Salem,  Oregon,  where  they  ended  their  journey  September  21,  1852. 

Mr.  Bagley  at  once  began  active  ministerial  and  missionary  work,  and 
labored  unremittingly  in  all  parts  of  the  Willamette  valley  the  next  eight  years. 
He  established  about  a  score  of  churches  and  probably  half  that  number  of 
church  edifices  were  built  mainly  through  his  instrumentality.  This  was  long 
prior  to  the  advent  of  telegraphs  and  railroads  and  the  conveniences  and  com- 
forts of  modern  travel.  His  labors  extended  from  the  Umpqua  on  the  south 
to  the  Columbia  river  on  the  north,  and  it  was  rare  indeed  that  he  remained  at 
home  twenty  days  in  succession  and,  in  fact,  a  large  part  of  these  eight  years 
was  employed  in  itinerant  work,  traveling  through  heat  and  dust,  rain,  snow, 
mud  and  floods  by  day  and  night,  nearly  entirely  on  horseback,  so  that  at  forty 
years  of  age  his  constitution  was  greatly  impaired  by  exposure  and  overwork. 

During  all  their  married  life  Mrs.  Bagley  had  been  an  invalid,  and  in  October, 
i860,  the  family  removed  from  near  Salem  to  this  place,  hoping  the  change  of 
climate  would  prove  beneficial  to  both  of  them.  The  trip  was  made  entirely 
overland   in   a   buggy — exccDt   from    Portland   to   Monticello — and   the   trip  that 


26  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

can  now  be  made  in  as  many  hours  required  ten  days  to  accomplish.  They 
made  the  list  of  families  in  the  village  up  to  an  even  twenty, 

The  unbroken  forest  began  where  the  Colonial  building  on  Columbia  street 
now  stands,  and  at  no  point  was  it  more  than  250  yards  from  the  waters  of  the 
bay. 

Mr.  Bagley  was  the  pioneer  minister  of  his  church  on  Puget  Sound  and  for 
years,  covering  almost  the  entire  period  of  the  Civil  war,  was  the  only  clergyman 
stationed  in  Seattle. 

Rev.  David  E.  Blaine,  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church,  had  been  instru- 
mental in  the  erection  of  a  church  building  about  1854  on  the  present  site  of 
the  Boston  block,  which  remained  unplastered  or  unceiled  for  ten  years  or  more. 
Here  Mr.  Bagley  and  a -small  band  of  worshipers  gathered  weekly. 

Early  in  1865  the  historic  "Brown  church"  was  built  at  the  corner  of  Second 
and  Madison  streets  and  Mr.  Bagley's  manual  labor  and  private  purse  con- 
tributed largely  to  that  work. 

Besides  his  ministerial  duties  Mr.  Bagley  became  an  active  and  prominent 
worker  in  the  advancement  of  the  material  growth  and  prosperity  of  Seattle  and 
King  county.  Largely  through  the  efforts  of  Hon.  Arthur  A.  Denny,  who  was 
a  member  of  the  legislature  of  1860-61,  the  university  was  located  here,  and 
Messrs.  Daniel  Bagley,  John  Webster  and  Edmund  Carr  were  named  com- 
missioners. Selling  of  lands  began  at  once,  and  in  March,  1861,  clearing  of  the 
site  and  work  on  the  university  buildings  began.  As  president  of  the  board  of 
commissioners  most  of  the  care  and  responsibility  of  the  sale  of  lands,  erection 
of  the  buildings,  and  establishing  of  scholastic  work  fell  upon  ]\Ir.  Bagley,  and 
during  the  succeeding  three  years  much  of  his  time  was  devoted  to  the  university 
interests,  and  those  labors  have  borne  abundant  fruits  for  Seattle  and  her 
citizens.  Just  prior  to  and  following  the  year  1870,  the  development  of  what 
are  now  known  as  the  Newcastle  coal  mines  began.  Daniel  Bagley,  George  F. 
Whitworth,  Josiah  Settle  and  C.  B.  Bagley  took  up  the  burden  of  this  work, 
which  was  the  first  to  become  commercially  successful  in  the  territory.  Mr. 
Bagley  was  the  responsible  leader  and  superintendent,  and  although  the  com- 
pany then  formed  was  succeeded  by  a  number  of  others,  the  credit  of  the 
opening  of  this  great  source  of  wealth  to  this  county  belongs  to  him  and  his 
associates. 

Until  1885  he  continued  as  pastor  of  the  church  here  and  after  the  twentieth 
year  in  charge  of  the  "Brown  church"  he  resigned  that  position.  After  that 
time  he  did  a  large  amount  of  ministerial  work  at  Ballard,  Columbia,  Yesler, 
South  Park,  etc.,  continuing  down  to  within  a  few  years  of  his  death. 

Forty-five  years  he  was  prominent,  active  and  efficient  as  a  clergyman  and 
private  citizen. 

Daniel  Bagley  was  a  life-long  member  of  the  Masonic  fraternity,  and  he  was 
the  honored  chaplain  of  St.  John's  Lodge,  No.  9,  in  Seattle,  many  years.  He 
was  made  a  Master  Mason  in  Princeton,  Illinois,  in  1851.  He  at  once  affiliated 
with  the  lodge  in  Salem,  Oregon,  on  his  arrival  there  in  1852,  and  between  that 
time  and  1856  became  a  Royal  Arch  Mason.  On  making  his  home  in  Seattle 
he  affiliated  with  St.  John's  Lodge  and  remained  a  member  of  that  lodge  during 
life.  He  first  appeared  in  Grand  Lodge  in  1861,  and  his  merits  as  a  Mason  are 
attested  by  the  fact  that  his  brethren  of  the  Grand  Lodge  of  Washington  elected 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  27 

him  their  most  worshipful  grand  master  at  the  annual  communication  of  that 
year. 

During  their  later  years  Mr.  Bagley  and  his  wife  made  their  home  with 
their  son  Clarence  in  Seattle  and  there  Mrs.  Bagley  died  October  ii,  1913. 

They  repose  side  by  side  in  Mount  Pleasant  on  Queen  Anne  Hill. 


C.  A.  COULTER. 


C.  A.  Coulter,  South  Bend's  efficient  mayor,  actuated  in  all  of  his  public 
service  by  an  vmquestioned  fidelity  to  the  general  good,  is  well  known  in  business 
circles  as  the  president  of  the  Coulter  Towboat  Company.  Since  xApril,  1890, 
he  has  made  his  home  in  the  city  where  he  now  resides  and  that  he  is  one  of  its 
most  honored  and  popular  residents  is  indicated  in  the  fact  that  he  is  now  serv- 
ing for  the  fourth  term  as  chief  executive.  A  native  of  Illinois,  he  was  born  at 
Shawneetown,  December  25,  1858,  and  when  only  seven  years  of  age  accompanied 
his  parents  on  their  removal  to  Cairo,  Illinois,  where  he  attended  school.  He 
afterward  took  up  the  blacksmith's  and  machinist's  trades  and  later  was  for 
seven  years  steamship  engineer  on  the  Mississippi  river.  He  was  also  an  engin- 
eer for  three  years  on  the  Ohio  river,  making  trips  from  Pittsburgh  to  New 
Orleans,  and  in  April,  1890,  he  arrived  in  South  Bend.  Here  he  built  the  tug- 
boats Laurel  and  Myrtle  and  also  the  boilers  for  his  boats.  Developing  his 
business,  he  organized  the  Coulter  Towboat  Company,  of  which  he  became  pres- 
ident, with  A.  J.  Burnham.  now  deceased,  as  vice  president  and  C.  A.  Werley 
secretary  and  treasurer.  Mr.  Burnham  was  at  one  time  captain  of  the  Laurel. 
Operating  his  tugboats,  Mr.  Coulter  has  developed  a  large  and  important 
business,  and  while  successfully  controlling  his  private  interests  in  that  connection 
he  has  also  made  investments  in  several  buildings  in  South  Bend,  from  which 
he  derives  a  handsome  annual  income. 

In  1890  Mr.  Coulter  was  married  to  Miss  Sallie  F.  Dyer,  of  Evansville, 
Indiana,  but  a  native  of  Kentucky.  The  children  of  this  marriage  are :  Dan  F., 
now  of  South  Bend;  Mary  L.,  the  wife  of  Earle  Floyd,  of  South  Bend;  C.  A., 
Jr.,  who  is  a  clerk  in  Drissler  &  Albright's  hardware  store;  and  Laura  Isabelle, 
in  school. 

His  fellow  townsmen,  recognizing  his  worth  and  ability,  have  frequently 
called  Mr.  Coulter  to  fill  public  offices.  He  served  as  a  member  of  the  city 
council  for  nine  years  and  while  on  the  council  served  as  mayor.  He  headed 
the  movement  to  replace  the  planked  streets  with  cement  paving  and  also  was 
active  in  instituting  the  movement  resulting  in  the  building  of  new  sidewalks  and 
the  installation  of  a  new  sewer  system.  To  accomplish  this  public  improvement 
work  the  city  was  bonded  for  seven  hundred  and  fifty  thousand  dollars,  all  of 
which  is  now  practically  paid  off  and  the  city  is  on  a  cash  basis.  His  fourth 
election  to  the  office  of  mayor  indicates  most  clearly  Mr.  Coulter's  standing  in 
public  regard.  He  is  held  in  the  highest  esteem  by  all  who  know  him  and  even 
those  opposed  to  him  politically  recognize  the  value  and  worth  of  his  service  as 
an  official  and  his  marked  devotion  to  the  public  good;  He  was  one  of  the  stock- 
holders and  organizers  of  the  Commercial  Club,  which  is  today  out  of  debt  and 


28  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

which  makes  its  club  house  the  headquarters  for  all  conventions.  He  has  always 
been  a  stalwart  democrat  but  never  sacrifices  the  public  good  to  partisanship 
nor  places  the  aggrandizement  of  self  before  the  general  welfare.  Fraternally 
he  is  connected  with  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  the  Modern  Woodmen  of 
America,  while  his  religious  faith  is  evidenced  by  his  membership  in  the  Presby- 
terian church.  Those  who  know  him,  and  he  has  a  wide  acquaintance,  entertain 
for  him  the  highest  regard  and  his  fellow  townsmen  are  proud  to  be  numbered 
among  his  friends. 


PHILIP  J.  MOURANT. 

In  an  enumeration  of  the  specific  forces  which  have  contributed  to  the  up- 
building of  Hoquiam  and  southwestern  Washington  mention  must  be  made  of 
the  Grays  Harbor  Construction  Company,  of  which  Philip  J.  Mourant  was  one 
of  the  founders  and  is  the  president.  Their  operations  along  building  lines  have 
been  extensive,  making  theirs  one  of  the  leading  features  in  the  substantial  up- 
building of  the  Grays  Harbor  district.  His  associates  in  business  and  those 
who  have  watched  his  career  speak  of  Mr.  Mourant  as  a  most  resourceful  and 
enterprising  man  who  seems  to  discriminate  readily  between  the  essential  and 
the  nonessential  and  utilizes  each  force  within  his  control  to  the  best  possible 
advantage. 

He  was  born  in  Quebec,  Canada,  in  1867,  and  was  but  four  years  of  age  when 
taken  by  his  parents  to  Wisconsin,  where  he  resided  from  1871  until  1887.  Dur- 
ing the  period  of  his  youth  there  passed  he  learned  the  carpenter's  trade  and 
when  twenty  years  of  age  responded  to  the  call  of  the  west,  making  his  way 
to  Vancouver,  Washington,  where  he  engaged  in  carpentering  until  1889.  In 
that  year  he  went  to  Hoquiam,  where  he  was  engaged  in  the  erection  of  the 
mill  of  the  Hoquiam  Sash  &  Door  Company.  At  that  time  the  only  industry 
in  the  city  was  the  small  mill  of  the  North  Western  Lumber  Company  and  in 
providing  a  site  for  the  sash  and  door  factory  Mr.  Mourant  tore  down  the  old 
James  residence,  which  was  the  first  schoolhouse  in  Hoquiam.  So  excellent  was 
his  work  in  the  erection  of  the  factory  that  he  was  accorded  the  contract  for  the 
building  of  the  Bay  \'iew  Hotel,  also  the  Pomona  Hotel  and  the  Acteson  home. 
In  1893  he  took  up  contract  work  as  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Mourant  &  Brisco, 
which  firm  erected  many  of  the  early  residences,  most  of  which  were  frame 
buildings.  When  Mr.  Brisco  went  to  Mexico  in  1898  he  was  succeeded  in  the 
partnership  by  Milton  L.  Watson,  who  has  since  been  identified  with  the  com- 
pany. At  that  point  in  its  histor>^  the  company  broadened  its  scope,  taking  on 
several  large  contracts,  including  that  for  the  construction  of  the  plant  of  the 
Grays  Harbor  Lumber  Company  and  for  the  National  Lumber  &  Box  Company. 
In  1904  Messrs.  Mourant  and  Watson  were  joined  by  James  T.  Quigg  and  in 
1907  the  Grays  Harbor  Construction  Company  was  incorporated. 

Again  the  scope  of  its  activities  was  broadened  and  the  paving  business  was 
included  in  1914,  and  some  of  the  finest  pavements  in  the  northwest  have  been 
laid  by  this  company,  including  paving  in  Aberdeen  and  Everett.  The  plant 
of  the  company  is  large  and  splendidly  equipped.    They  are  engaged  in  the  build- 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  29 

ing  of  mills  and  bridges  and  also  take  contracts  for  pile  driving,  dredging  and 
similar  work.  Aside  from  the  structures  already  mentioned  as  erected  by  this 
company,  they  are  well  known  as  the  builders  of  the  Woodlawn  Mill  &  Boom 
Company  plant,  the  mill  of  the  Bridal  Veil  Lumber  Company  at  Bridal  Veil, 
Oregon,  the  Lytle  block  at  Hoquiam,  the  Emerson  building,  the  Hicks  building, 
the  Foster  block,  the  Washington  and  Lincoln  schools  and  the  Stearns  and 
Lytle  residences.  They  built  the  county  bridge  over  the  Chehalis  river  and  built 
the  government  wharf  and  trestle  for  the  government  jetty  in  the  harbor  and 
are  handling  all  the  rock  which  is  being  used  by  the  government  there.  The 
company  owns  large  bunkers  at  Hoquiam,  together  with  a  fleet  of  scows  and 
two  tugs,  the  Manette  and  Hunter.  In  fact  the  equipment  of  the  Grays  Harbor 
Construction  Company  is  the  best  and  most  complete  in  this  part  of  the  country 
and  represents  an  expenditure  of  many  thousands  of  dollars — an  expenditure 
which  indicates  their  faith  in  the  future  of  the  city  and  in  the  development  of 
western  Washington.  In  addition  to  his  other  interests  Mr.  Mourant  has  been 
vice  president  of  the  Rychard  Grocery  Company  and  was  also  a  stockholder  in 
the  Hoquiam  Trust  Company. 

In  1 891  Mr.  Mourant  was  married  in  Hopetown,  Canada,  to  Miss  Lydia  A. 
Ross,  a  native  of  Canada,  and  they  have  one  child,  Ethel.  Fraternally  Mr. 
Mourant  is  an  Elk,  and  at  this  writing,  in  1916,  is  exalted  ruler  of  his  lodge. 
He  is  also  connected  with  the  Eagles  and  the  United  Workmen.  In  politics  he 
is  an  independent  democrat  and  served  as  mayor  of  the  city  in  1910  and  previous 
to  that  time  as  a  member  of  the  city  council,  giving  active  aid  in  office  and  out 
of  it  to  every  measure  or  movement  which  he  deems  of  value  in  the  public  life 
of  the  community.  He  is  a  man  of  resolute  purpose  who  never  falls  short  of 
the  accomplishment  of  a  task  to  which  he  sets  himself  and  his  developing  powers 
are  indicated  in  the  constant  growth  of  his  business,  which  is  now  of  an  extensive 
and  important  character. 


FRANK  CARLETON  TECK. 

Frank  Carleton  Teck,  newspaper  and  magazine  writer,  poet  and  literary  critic, 
living  at  Port  Angeles,  was  born  in  Northfield,  Minnesota,  November  12,  1869, 
and  the  public  schools  of  Shieldsville  and  of  Minneapolis,  Minnesota,  afiforded 
him  his  educational  opportunities.  The  broad  field  of  reading,  however,  is  ever 
open  to  the  individual  if  he  has  the  taste  and  inclination  to  delve  therein  and 
Mr.  Teck  has  never  failed  to  embrace  his  opportunities  in  that  direction.  His 
initial  step  in  the  business  world  was  made  as  a  newspaper  reporter  and  the  years 
have  brought  him  through  successive  stages  to  his  present  high  standing  as  a 
newspaper  and  magazine  writer,  to  which  work  he  has  devoted  the  greater  part 
of  his  attention  since  January,  1889,  or  during  the  entire  period  of  his  residence 
in  western  Washington.  He  was  a  writer  of  verse  and  literary  criticism  for 
magazines  for  fifteen  years  prior  to  1907,  while  living  in  Bellingham.  He  has 
brought  forth  one  brochure  of  verses,  "Under  Western  Skies,"  and  he  has  been 
poet  of  the  Washington  State  Press  Association  two  or  three  times.  He  has 
been  city  editor  and  editor  of  several  Bellingham  newspapers  at  different  times, 


30  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

also  editor  of  the  Seattle  Town  Crier,  the  Anacortes  American,  the  Pacific  Motor 
Boat  and  the  Pacific  Fisherman  and  has  been  staff  writer  on  the  Pacific  Monthly 
and  Sunset. 

The  scope  of  Mr.  Teck's  activities  is  further  indicated  in  the  fact  that  he 
was  secretary  of  the  Bellingham  Chamber  of  Commerce  from  1904  until  1907 
inclusive  and  since  the  ist  of  August,  1914,  has  been  secretary  of  the  Port 
Angeles  Commercial  Club.  On  the  organization  of  the  Washington  Federation 
of  Commercial  Organizations  in  Everett,  May  6,  191 5,  he  was  chosen  secretary- 
treasurer  and  so  continued  until  October  6,  191 6,  when,  he  was  elected  vice 
president. 

On  the  3d  of  November,  1895,  at  Bellingham,  Air.  Teck  was  married  to  Miss 
Daisy  Bell,  a  daughter  of  Captain  and  Mrs.  J.  J.  Bell,  of  that  city.  Her  father 
was  formerly  sheriff  of  Whatcom  county  and  .her  brother,  Raymond  R.  Bell, 
is  a  well  known  northwest  theatrical  manager. 

Mr.  Teck  has  joined  but  one  lodge,  the  Elks,  having  membership  at  Belling- 
ham for  many  years,  while  at  present  he  is  connected  with  Naval  Lodge,  No. 
353,  of  Port  Angeles.  His  military  experience  covers  eight  years  with  Company 
F  of  the  First  Infantry  Regiment  of  the  National  Guard  of  Washington  at  Bell- 
ingham, of  which  he  was  successively  private,  first  sergeant  and  second  and  first 
lieutenant.  He  was  also  a  trustee  of  the  Bellingham  State  Normal  School  from 
March,  1899,  until  June,  1905,  when  he  was  retired  at  his  own  request. 


WILLIAM  L.  ADAMS. 


William  L.  Adams,  since  1903  president  of  the  First  National  Bank  of 
Hoquiam,  w-as  born  in  Berwick,  Pennsylvania,  May  27,  i860,  a  son  of  Enos 
L.  and  Margaret  (Kisner)  Adams.  The  genealogy  of  the  family  is  complete 
back  in  direct  line  to  John  Adams,  of  East  Friesland,  who  was  born  prior  to  the 
year  1400.  The  ancestors  of  all  four  grandparents  of  William  L.  Adams  were 
early  settlers  of  eastern  Pennsylvania  or  New  Jersey  and  four  of  his  ancestors 
served  in  the  Revolutionary  war. 

Provided  with  liberal  educational  advantages,  William  L.  Adams  was  grad- 
uated from  Mount  Union  College  at  Alliance,  Ohio,  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor 
of  Philosophy  in  i88t.  The  following  year  he  engaged  in  sheep  ranching  in 
western  Texas,  he  being  one  of  the  first  to  sink  wells  and  run  sheep  on  the  staked 
plains  of  Texas.  In  1882  he  was  called  to  the  position  of  county  commissioner  of 
Mitchell  county,  Texas,  which  offtce  he  filled  for  three  years,  and  from  1885  to 
1888  he  was  county  assessor  of  Alidland  county,  Texas. 

In  the  latter  year  Mr.  Adams  was  married  at  Fort  Worth.  Texas,  to  Miss 
Elizabeth  A.  Davis,  who  was  born  at  Colon.  Michigan,  a  daughter  of  Willis  G.  and 
Adelia  (Anderson)  Davis,  and  was  graduated  from  the  Michigan  Seminary  at 
.  Kalamazoo.  They  became  residents  of  Washington  in  1888  while  it  was  still 
under  territorial  rule,  settling  at  Hoquiam  on  the  12th  of  March,  1890.  There 
they  reared  their  family  but  their  first  born,  a  son,  Ralph,  died  at  Ellensburg  in 
infancy.  The  others  are :  Gaylord,  who  married  Leal  Stevenson  and  is  assistant 
cashier  in  the  First  National  Bank  of  Hoquiam;  Gwenivere,  a  graduate  of  Vassar 


WILLIAM  L.  ADAMS 


THE   NEW  YORK 
PUBLIC  UBRARY 


ASTOR,    LENOX 
TILDEN  FOUNDATION 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  33 

College,  class  of  191 5  ;  Elizabeth,  a  graduate  of  Mount  Vernon  Seminary  at  Wash- 
ington, D.  C,  class  of  1917;  and  William  L.,  Jr.,  who  was  born  in  1907,  on  his 
father's   birthday. 

Throughout  the  period  of  his  residence  in  Hoquiam  Air.  Adams  has  been 
actively  and  prominently  connected  with  its  interests  and  its  development.  He 
organized  the  Hoquiam  high  school  in  1890  and  graduated  its  first  class  in  1892. 
His  identification  with  the  banking  business  dates  from  February  i,  1893,  when  he 
became  cashier  of  the  Hoquiam  National  Bank.  A  few  months  later  he  took  the 
init'ative  in  the  project  to  consolidate  the  business  of  the  Hoquiam  National  Bank 
with  that  of  the  First  National.  The  consolidation  was  consummated  on  July 
i8th  in  the  very  teeth  of  the  panic  of  1893.  The  title  and  charter  of  the  First 
National  Bank  were  retained  and  for  ten  years  he  was  cashier  of  the  First  National 
Bank,  at  the  end  of  which  time  he  was  elected  to  the  presidency,  in  wdiich  position 
of  executive  control  he  has  now^  continued  for  fourteen  years.  His  position  in 
banking  circles  is  indicated  in  the  fact  that  he  was  honored  with  the  presidency  of 
the  Washington  State  Bankers  Association  in  1908-9.  He  is  also  interested  finan- 
cially in  timber  and  lumbering,  being  at  this  time  president  of  the  Keystone  Tim- 
ber Company  and  vice  president  of  the  Grays  Harbor  Lumber  Company. 

Mr.  Adams  was  the  organizer  and  is  the  president  of  the  Hoquiam  Chapter 
of  the  Sons  of  the  American  Revolution.  He  is  prominent  in  Masonry  as  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Scottish  Rite  and  the  Mystic  Shrine ;  he  belongs  to  the  Elks  lodge  and 
is  a  member  of  the  Grays  Harbor  Country  Club  and  the  Delta  Tau  Delta  frater- 
nity. His  religious  faith  is  that  of  the  Episcopal  church,  while  his  political  views 
are  indicated  in  his  endorsement  of  the  principles  and  measures  of  the  republican 
party.  He  makes  his  home  at  the  corner  of  Hill  avenue  and  Center  street  in 
Hoquiam  and  for  a  quarter  of  a  century  has  been  regarded  as  one  of  its  most 
valuable  and  distinguished  citizens. 


JOHN  LEARY 


John  Leary  was  one  of  the  early  mayors  of  Seattle  and  a  pioneer  lawyer  but 
retired  from  his  profession  to  enter  upon  business  pursuits  and  became  an  active 
factor  in  the  upbuilding  of  the  city.  He  was  closely  associated  with  ever  in- 
creasing activities  of  larger  scope  and  far-reaching  effect  and  Seattle  has  had  no 
more  enterprising  citizen,  so  that  no  history  of  the  city  would  be  complete  without 
extended  reference  to  him. 

Mr.  Leary  was  a  native  of  New  Brunswick,  his  birth  having  occurred  at 
St.  John,  November  i,  1837.  Early  in  life  he  started  in  the  business  world  on 
his  own  account  and  soon  developed  unusual  aptitude  for  business  and  a  genius 
for  the  successful  creation  and  management  of  large  enterprises.  His  initial 
efforts  were  along  the  line  of  the  lumber  trade  and  "he  became  an  extensive  man- 
ufacturer and  shipper  of  lumber,  to  which  business  he  devoted  his  energies 
between  the  years  1854  and  1867.  He  also  conducted  an  extensive  general 
mercantile  establishment  in  his  native  town  and  also  at  Woodstock,  New  Bruns- 
wick.    Prosperity  had  attended  his  efforts,  enabling  him  to  win  a  modest  fortune. 


34  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

but  the  repeal  of  the  reciprocity  treaty  between  the  United  States  and  Canada 
resulted  in  losses  for  him.  Crossing  the  border  into  Maine,  he  conducted  a  lum- 
ber business  at  Houlton,  that  state,  for  some  time,  but  the  Puget  Sound  country 
was  fast  coming  to  the  front  as  a  great  lumber  center  and  he  resolved  to  become 
one  of  the  operators  in  the  new  field. 

Mr.  Leary  reached  Seattle  in  1869,  finding  a  little  frontier  village  with  a 
population  of  about  one  thousand.  Keen  sagacity  enabled  him  to  recognize  the 
prospect  for  future  business  conditions  and  from  that  time  forward  until  his 
death  he  was  a  cooperant  factor  in  measures  and  movements  resulting  largely 
to  the  benefit  and  upbuilding  of  the  city  as  well  as  proving  a  source  of  substantial 
profit  for  himself.  In  1871  he  was  admitted  to  the  bar  and  entered  upon  active 
practice  as  junior  partner  in  the  law  firm  of  McNaught  &  Leary,  which  associa- 
tion was  maintained  until  1878,  when  he  became  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Struve, 
Haines  &  Leary.  Four  years  later,  however,  he  retired  from  active  law  practice 
and  became  a  factor  in  the  management  of  gigantic  commercial  and  public  enter- 
prises which  have  led  not  only  to  the  improvement  of  the  city  but  also  to  the 
development  of  the  surrounding  country.  In  the  meantime,  however,  he  had 
served  for  several  terms  as  a  member  of  the  city  council  of  Seattle  and  in  1884 
was  elected  mayor.  His  was  a  notable  administration  during  the  formative  period 
in  the  city's  history  and  he  exercised  his  official  prerogatives  in  such  a  manner 
that  the  public  welfare  was  greatly  promoted  and  in  all  that  he  did  he  looked 
beyond  the  exigencies  of  the  present  to  the  opportunities  and  possibilities  of  the 
future.  The  position  of  mayor  was  not  a  salaried  one  at  that  time,  but  he  gave 
much  time  and  thought  to  the  direction  of  municipal  affairs  and  while  serving 
was  instrumental  in  having  First  avenue,  then  a  mud  hole,  improved  and  planked. 
He  was  the  first  mayor  to  keep  regular  office  hours  and  thoroughly  systematized 
municipal  interests.  Through  the  conduct  and  direction  of  important  business 
enterprises  his  work  was  perhaps  of  even  greater  value  to  Seattle.  A  contempo- 
rary historian  said  in  this  connection : 

"When  he  came  to  Seattle  none  of  the  important  enterprises  which  have  made 
possible  its  present  greatness  had  been  inaugurated.  The  most  vital  period  of  the 
city's  history  had  just  begun.  Only  men  of  the  keenest  foresight  anticipated  and 
prepared  for  a  struggle,  the  issue  of  which  meant  the  very  existence  of  the  city 
itself.  No  city  so  richly  endowed  by  nature  ever  stood  in  such  need  of  strong, 
brave-  and  sagacious  men.  Mr.  Leary  was  among  the  first  to  outline  a  course 
of  action  such  as  would  preserve  the  supremacy  of  Seattle,  and  with  characteristic 
energy  and  foresight  he  threw  himself  into  the  work.  A  natural  leader,  he  was 
soon  at  the  head  of  all  that  was  going  on.  A  pioneer  among  pioneers,  it  fell  to  his 
lot  to  blaze  the  way  for  what  time  has  proven  to  have  been  a  wise  and  well  directed 
move.  When  the  Northern  Pacific  Railroad  Company  sought  to  ignore  and 
possibly  to  commercially  destroy  Seattle,  Mr.  Leary  became  a  leader  of  resolute 
men  who  heroically  undertook  to  build  up  the  city  independently  of  the  opposition 
of  this  powerful  corporation.  To  this  end  the  Seattle  &  Walla  Walla  Railroad 
was  built,  an  enterprise  which  at  that  time  served  a  most  useful  purpose  in  restor- 
ing confidence  in  the  business  future  of  the  city,  and  which  has  ever  since  been 
a  source  of  large  revenue  to  the  place.  Throughout  the  entire  struggle,  which 
involved  the  very  existence  of  Seattle,  Mr.  Leary  was  most  actively  engaged, 
and  to  his  labors,  his  counsel  and  his  means  the  city  is  indeed  greatly  indebted." 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  35 

In  1872  Mr.  Leary  turned  his  attention  to  the  development  of  the  coal  fields 
of  this  locality,  opening  and  operating  the  Talbot  mine  in  connection  with  John 
Collins.  He  was  instrumental  in  organizing  a  company  for  supplying  the  city 
with  gas  and  served  as  its  president  until  1878,  thus  being  closely  identified  with 
the  early  material  development  of  his  community.  His  enterprise  also  resulted 
in  the  establishment  of  the  waterworks  system  and  along  these  and  many  other 
lines  his  efforts  were  so  directed  that  splendid  benefits  resulted  to  the  city.  In 
fact,  he  was  one  of  the  men  who  laid  the  foundations  for  the  future  growth  and 
importance  of  Seattle.  It  was  he  who  made  known  to  the  world  the  resources 
of  the  city  in  iron  and  coal.  Between  the  years  1878  and  1880  he  had  exploring 
parties  out  all  along  the  west  coast  to  Cape  Flattery  and  on  the  Skagit  and  Similki- 
meen  rivers,  also  through  the  Mount  Baker  district  and  several  counties  in  eastern 
Washington.  His  explorations  proved  conclusively  that  western  Washington  was 
rich  in  coal  and  iron,  while  here  and  there  valuable  deposits  of  precious  metals  were 
to  be  found.  The  value  of  Mr.  Leary's  work  to  the  state  in  this  connection  cannot 
be  overestimated,  as  he  performed  a  work  the  expense  of  which  is  usually  borne 
by  the  commonwealths  themselves.  Another  phase  of  his  activity  reached  into 
the  field  of  journalism.  In  1882  he  became  principal  owner  of  the  Seattle  Post, 
now  consolidated  with  the  Intelligencer  under  the  style  of  the  Post-Intelligencer. 
He  brought  about  the  amalgamation  of  the  morning  papers  and  erected  what  was 
known  as  the  Post  building,  one  of  the  best  of  the  early  business  blocks  of  the 
city.  In  1883  he  was  associated  with  Mr.  Yesler  in  the  erection  of  the  Yesler- 
Leary  block  at  a  cost  of  more  than  one  hundred  thousand  dollars,  but  this  build- 
ing, which  was  then  the  finest  in  the  city,  was  destroyed  by  the  great  fire  of 
Tune,  1889.  One  can  never  measure  the  full  extent  of  Mr.  Leary's  efforts,  for 
his  activity  touched  almost  every  line  leading  to  public  progress.  He  was  active 
in  the  establishment  of  the  Alaska  Mail  service,  resulting  in  the  development 
of  important  trade  connections  between  that  country  and  Seattle.  He  was  elected 
to  the  presidency  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  which  he  had  aided  in  organiz- 
ing, and  he  also  became  president  of  the  Seattle  Land  &  Improvement  Company 
and  of  the  West  Coast  Improvement  Company  and  the  Seattle  Warehouse  & 
Elevator  Company.  He  was  on  the  directorate  of  the  Seattle,  Lake  Shore  & 
Eastern  Railway  Company,  was  one  of  the  directors  of  the  West  Street  &  North 
End  Electric  Railway  Company,  which  he  aided  in  organizing,  and  was  likewise 
a  promoter  and  director  of  the  James  Street  &  Broadway  Cable  &  Electric  line. 
In  financial  circles  he  figured  prominently  as  president  of  the  Seattle  National 
Bank  but  was  compelled  to  resign  that  position  on  account  of  the  demands  of 
other  business  interests.  In  February,  1891,  he  organized  the  Columbia  River 
&  Puget  Sound  Navigation  Company,  capitalized  for  five  hundred  thousand 
dollars,  in  which  he  held  one-fifth  of  the  stock.  That  company  owned  the  steam- 
ers Telephone,  Fleetwood,  Bailey  Gatzert,  Floyd  and  other  vessels  operating  be- 
tween Puget  Sound  and  Victoria.    Ere  his  death  a  biographer  wrote  of  him: 

"It  is  a  characteristic'  of  Mr.  Leary's  make-up  that  he  moves  on  large  lines 
and  is  never  so  happy  as  when  at  the  head  of  some  great  business  enterprise. 
His  very  presence  is  stimulating.  Bouyant  and  hopeful  by  nature,  he  imparts 
his  own  enthusiasm  to  those  around  him.  Pie  has  not  overlooked  the  importance 
of  manufacturing  interests  to  a  city  like  Seattle,  and  over  and  over  again  has 
encouraged  and  aided,  often  at  a  personal  loss,  in  the  establishment  of  manufac- 


36  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

turing  enterprises,  having  in  this  regard  probably  done  more  than  any  other  citizen 
of  Seattle.  He  has  ever  recognized  and  acted  on  the  principle  that  property 
has  its  duties  as  well  as  rights,  and  that  one  of  its  prime  duties  is  to  aid  and 
build  up  the  community  where  the  possessor  has  made  his  wealth.  There  are  few 
men  in  the  city,  therefore,  who,  in  the  course  of  the  last  twenty  years,  have  aided 
in  giving  employment  to  a  larger  number  of  men  than  ]\Ir.  Leary,  or  whose  indi- 
vidual eft'orts  have  contributed  more  of  good  to  the  general  prosperity  of 
Seattle." 

On  the  2ist  of  April.  1892,  Mr.  Leary  wedded  Eliza  P.  Ferry,  a  daughter  of 
the  late  Governor  Elisha  P.  Ferry.  Their  happy  married  life  was  terminated 
in  his  death  on  the  9th  of  February,  1905,  at  which  time  he  left  an  estate  valued 
at  about  two  million  dollars.  He  practically  retired  from  active  business  about 
1893.  After  his  death  the  estate  built  upon  the  site  of  his  old  home  the  Leary- 
Ferry  building. 

Mr.  Leary  was  a  man  of  most  generous  spirit,  giving  freely  in  charity  to 
worthy  individuals  and  to  important  ptiblic  enterprises.  He  built  the  finest  resi- 
dence in  Seattle  just  before  his  death  and  took  great  pleasure  in  planning  and 
erecting  the  home,  but  did  not  live  to  occupy  it.  He  might  be  termed  a  man  of 
large  efficiency,  of  large  purpose  and  larger  action.  He  looked  at  no  question 
from  a  narrow  or  contracted  standpoint,  but  had  a  broad  vision  of  conditions, 
opportunities  and  advantages.  His  life  was  never  self-centered  but  reached 
out  along  all  those  lines  which  lead  to  municipal  progress  and  public  benefit.  His 
work  has  not  yet  reached  its  full  fruition  but,  like  the  constantly  broadening 
ripple  on  the  surface  of  the  water,  its  efi'ect  is  still  felt  in  the  upbuilding  and 
improvement  of  the  city.  ]\Irs.  Leary  still  makes  her  home  in  Seattle  and  is  very 
active  in  charitable  w'ork  and  in  club  circles,  being  identified  with  many  women's 
clubs.  Mr.  Leary  was  also  president  of  the  Rainier  Club,  the  leading  social 
organization  of  Seattle,  and  those  who  came  in  contact  with  him  entertained 
for  him  the  warmest  friendship,  the  highest  admiration  and  the  greatest  esteem. 
His  was  a  life  in  which  merit  brought  him  to  the  front  and  made  him  a  leader 
of  men. 


EDWARD  C.  MOXY. 


A  spirit  of  energy  and  enterprise  has  actuated  Edward  C.  Mony  at  every 
point  in  his  business  career  and  gained  for  him  prominence  as  the  secretary  and 
treasurer  of  the  Everett  Improvement  Company.  He  was  born  in  Mackford, 
Green  Lake  county,  Wisconsin,  August  19,  1864,  a  son  of  Alexander  Mony,  who 
was  a  native  of  Pennsylvania  but  of  Irish  lineage  and  in  the  year  1848  removed 
to  Wisconsin,  becoming  one  of  the  pioneer  farmers  of  that  state.  His  wife  was 
a  native  of  Canada  and  was  of  Scotch  descent. 

Edward  C.  Mony  attended  the  public  schools  of  his  native  town  and  after- 
wards attended  a  business  college  at  St.  Paul,  Minnesota.  His  early  life  was 
spent  upon  the  home  farm  and  in  early  manhood  he  taught  school.  He  next 
entered  a  law  office  but  after  a  brief  period  accepted  a  position  in  the  general 
offices  of  the  Chicago,  ^Milwaukee  &  St.  Paul  Railroad  Company.     He  was  also 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  37 

employed  for  a  short  time  by  the  Wisconsin  Central.  He  became  interested  in 
the  west  and  made  his  way  to  Washington,  settHng  at  Hoquiam  in  the  spring 
of  1890.  He  worked  there  for  the  real  estate  firm  of  Heermans,  Congdon  & 
Company  for  two  years,  during  which  period  he  gained  comprehensive  knowl- 
edge of  the  real  estate  business.  In  March,  1892,  he  removed  to  Everett  when 
the  city  had  a  population  of  but  a  few  thousand  people.  He  immediately  secured 
a  position  with  the  Everett  Land  Company  and  continued  with  that  organization 
and  its  successor,  the  Everett  Improvement  Company,  becoming  secretary  and 
treasurer  of  the  latter  company.  In  this  field  he  has  operated  extensively  and 
successfully  and  is  regarded  as  one  of  the  foremost  real  estate  men  of  Everett, 
thoroughly  conversant  with  values  and  with  the  property  that  is  upon  the  mar- 
ket. This  company  has  negotiated  many  important  realty  transfers  and  his 
opinions  upon  any  question  are  largely  accepted  as  authority.  Extending  his 
business  efl^orts  into  other  connections,  Mr.  Mony  is  now  secretary  and  treas- 
urer of  the  Everett  Railway,  Light  &  Water  Company  and  secretary  of  the  Everett 
Dock  &  Warehouse  Company  and  also  of  the  Everett  Theatre  Company. 

On  the  2d  of  June.  1897.  in  Everett,  Mr.  Mony  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Miss  Stella  Cougill,  a  native  of  San  Jose,  California.  They  have  two  children, 
namely,  Robert  C,  and  ^Mary  Louise.  The  family  residence  is  at  No.  2326 
Rucker  avenue. 

Mr.  and  Airs.  Alony  are  members  of  the  Everett  Golf  and  Country  Club.  He 
is  also  identified  with  Everett  Lodge,  No.  479,  B.  P.  O.  E.,  with  the  Everett 
Commercial  Club  and  the  Cascade  Club,  and  his  political  allegiance  is  given  to 
the  republican  party,  which  finds  in  him  a  stalwart  champion  because  of  his 
earnest  belief  in  its  principles.  He  had  no  financial  assistance  on  starting  out  in 
life  for  himself  and  has  won  whatever  success  he  has  achieved  at  the  price  of 
earnest,  self-denying  efi^ort,  his  record  proving  what  may  be  accomplished  through 
close  application,  persistent  energy  and  indefatigable  industry. 


PRESTON  M.  TROY. 


Preston  AI.  Troy  is  now  dividing  his  energies  between  the  aft'airs  of  the 
Olympia  National  Bank,  of  which  he  is  president,  and  the  practice  of  law.  For 
a  number  of  years  he  has  been  a  member  of  the  bar  at  Olympia  and  has  gained 
a  place  of  leadership  in  his  profession.  He  has  also  long  been  prominent  in  the 
councils  of  the  democratic  party  of  the  state  and  served  as  a  delegate  to  the 
national  convention  at  Baltimore  in  19 12.  He  was  born  in  Dungeness,  Wash- 
ington, January  22,  1867,  and  is  a  son  of  Smith  and  Laura  B.  Troy.  His  father 
was  born  in  Washington  county,  Pennsylvania,  June  4,  1833,  and  after  attending 
the  public  schools  was  a  student  in  the  Washington  and  Jeft'erson  College.  On 
beginning  his  independent  career  he  engaged  in  the  coal  business  on  the  Missis- 
sippi river  but  in  1849  went  to  the  gold  fields  of  California,  going  from  Texas 
through  Mexico  to  the  coast.  From  San  Francisco  he  i)roceeded  to  the  Placer- 
ville  mines,  where  he  prospected  and  also  took  an  active  part  in  politics.  In  1852 
he  drifted  north  to  the  Rogue  River  valley  of  Oregon,  where  he  engaged  in 
mining  for  a  number  of  years.    There  he  also  participated  in  political  affairs  and 


38  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

was  a  member  of  the  first  state  democratic  convention  held  in  Oregon.  In  i860 
he  joined  the  rush  to  the  Cariboo  mines  in  British  Columbia,  where  he  remained 
until  1863,  when  he  returned  to  the  States  and  settled  on  land  which  is  now- 
included  in  the  town  of  Dungeness.  There  he  turned  his  attention  to  agricultural 
pursuits,  but  his  fellow  citizens,  recognizing  his  ability  and  faithfulness,  time 
and  algain  called  him  to  public  office.  For  twelve  years  he  was  superintendent 
of  schools  of  Clallam  county,  for  a  long  period  was  a  member  of  the  board  of 
county  commissioners,  in  1889  was  elected  county  auditor  and  for  two  terms  was 
a  member  of  the  legislature,  representing  Clallam  and  San  Juan  counties  in  the 
lower  house  for  one  term  in  the  territorial  period,  and  representing  Clallam 
county  in  the  second  state  legislature.  His  advice  was  often  sought  on  political 
questions  and  he  did  much  to  secure  the  success  of  his  party  at  the  polls.  Fra- 
ternally he  was  a  Alason  and  his  religious  faith  was  indicated  by  his  membership 
in  the  Presbyterian  church.  He  was  married  in  Dungeness,  June  4,  1865,  to 
Miss  Laura  Bass  Weir,  who  died  there  May  11,  1894.  She  was  born  in  Bowie 
county,  Texas,  and  was  a  daughter  of  John  and  Saluda  J.  (Buchanan)  Weir, 
who  removed  with  their  family  to  the  Pacific  coast  in  the  '50s,  making  the  long 
journey  across  the  plains  in  a  prairie  schooner.  They  settled  upon  land  near 
Los  Angeles  but  soon  afterward  left  as  they  were  seriously  annoyed  by  the  Mex- 
icans, who  broke  down  the  fences  and  allowed  their  cattle  to  pasture  on  the 
growing  crops.  It  was  in  i860  that  the  Weir  family  removed  to  Washington 
by  boat  and  they  took  up  their  home  in  Dungeness,  where  Mr.  Weir  for  some 
time  engaged  in  hunting,  selling  the  game  which  he  killed  to  the  settlers  in  that 
locality.  Later  he  farmed  and  was  following  agricultural  pursuits  at  the  time 
of  his  death  in  1885.  To  Mr.  and  Airs.  Troy  were  born  five  children:  Preston 
M.,  of  this  review;  John  Weir,  editor  and  owner  of  the  Alaska  Empire,  a  paper 
published  at  Juneau,  Alaska ;  David  Smith,  who  was  killed  in  an  automobile 
accident  at  Port  Townsend,  August  17,  1916,  and  who  had  served  as  state  rep- 
resentative and  at  time  of  his  death  was  state  senator;  Mrs.  I.  Callow,  who  is 
principal  of  a  public  school  in  Dungeness;  and  Mrs.  Laura  I.  Stone,  principal  of 
the  high  school  in  Phoenix,  Arizona. 

Preston  M.  Troy  divided  his  time  between  attending  the  public  schools  and 
working  in  the  logging  camps  until  he  was  eighteen  years  old,  when  he  began 
farming  in  partnership  with  his  uncle  and  so  continued  until  he  attained  his  ma- 
jority. He  then  became  a  student  in  the  Olympia  Collegiate  Institute,  from 
which  he  was  graduated  in  1890,  and  subsequently  he  entered  the  law  school  of 
the  University  of  Michigan,  which  conferred  upon  him  the  LL.B.  degree  in 
1893.  He  then  returned  to  Olympia  and  has  since  followed  his  profession, 
although  of  late  years  he  has  given  the  greater  part  of  his  attention  to  the  dis- 
charge of  his  duties  as  president  of  the  Olympia  National  Bank.  From  1896 
to  1899  and  again  from  1902  to  1906  he  held  the  office  of  city  attorney  and  from 
1904  until  1908  he  was  prosecuting  attorney  of  Thurston  county.  In  1904  he 
was  the  democratic  candidate  for  superior  judge  and  was  defeated  by  only 
seventy-five  votes,  and  in  1910  he  was  nominated  by  the  non-partisan  judiciary 
league  convention  as  one  of  five  candidates  for  justice  of  the  supreme  court  of 
the  state.  For  seven  years  he  was  chairman  of  the  state  board  of  law  exam- 
iners and  thus  had  an  important  part  in  determining  the  requirements  for  ad- 
mission to  the  bar.    In  1913  he  was  elected  vice  president  of  the  Olympia  National 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  39 

Bank  and  in  September,  1914,  following  the  death  of  Leopold  F.  Schmidt,  presi- 
dent of  the  institution,  Mr.  Troy  was  elected  its  chief  executive  ofificer.  He  has 
since  held  that  position  and  has  manifested  sound  judgment,  a  thorough  under- 
standing of  the  principles  underlying  the  banking  business  and  keen  insight  into 
present  day  conditions.  He  is  also  a  director  of  the  Building  &  Loan  Associa- 
tion and  recognition  of  his  executive  ability  and  highly  developed  business  sense 
was  accorded  him  when  he  was  elected  trustee  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce 
and  later,  in  March,  1916,  and  again  in  March,  1917,  was  chosen  president  of 
that  organization,  which  is  recognized  as  perhaps  the  most  efficient  agency  for 
promoting  the  all-round  development  of  the  city. 

Mr.  Troy  was  married  in  Dayton,  Washington,  October  28,  1896,  to  Miss 
Eva  Sturdevant,  by  whom  he  has  three  children :  Marion  Lucile,  who  is  a  high 
school  graduate  and  is  now  attending  the  State  University ;  Harold  Preston,  who 
is  sixteen  years  old  and  is  attending  high  school;  and  Smith,  ten  years  of  age, 
in  the  public  schools. 

Mr.  Troy  is  one  of  the  best  known  democrats  in  the  state  of  Washington, 
having  served  as  a  member  of  the  executive  committee  of  the  democratic  state 
central  committee  for  four  years  and  having  been  a  delegate  in  1912  to  the 
national  convention  at  Baltimore  which  nominated  Woodrow  Wilson  for  presi- 
dent. From  the  first  he  has  been  a  stanch  W'ilson  man  and  was  one  of  the 
organizers  of  the  Woodrow  Wilson  League  of  Washington.  He  is  a  past  master 
of  Olympia  Lodge,  No.  i,  F.  &  A.  M.,  belongs  to  the  various  Scottish  Rite  Ma- 
sonic bodies,  is  past  chancellor  of  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  is  a  member  of 
the  Woodmen  of  the  World,  the  Native  Sons  of  W'ashington.  the  University 
Club  of  Tacoma,  the  Olympia  Golf  Club  and  the  Commercial  Club  of  Tacoma. 
He  is  likewise  a  trustee  of  the  Thurston  County  Pioneer  and  Historic  Associa- 
tion and  chairman  of  the  Simcrtis  monument  committee.  It  is  but  natural  that 
he  should  take  a  keen  interest  in  the  preservation  of  local  history,  for  his  entire 
life  has  been  passed  in  this  state  and  he  has  vivid  memories  of  pioneer  days 
when  the  white  man  had  only  begun  to  gain  a  footing  in  the  Puget  Sound  coun- 
try and  when  it  was  impossible  to  foretell  the  development  which  a  half  cen- 
tury was  to  bring  about.  He  believes  that  the  next  fifty  years  will  also  be  a 
period  of  rapid  progress  and  no  project  for  the  advancement  of  city  or  state 
fails  to  receive  his  enthusiastic  support. 


MISS  L.  C.  NICHOLSON. 

Miss  L.  C.  Nicholson  needs  no  introduction  to  the  readers  of  this  volume, 
for  she  became  widely  known  as  the  proprietor  of  the  Snohomish  General  Hos- 
pital, an  institution  of  which  the  city  of  Snohomish  has  every  reason  to  be  proud, 
for  it  is  conducted  along  the  most  progressive  lines.  It  was  established  about 
ten  years  ago  and  two  years  ago  Miss  Nicholson  purchased  the  hospital.  It  is 
modern  in  every  department  and  furnishes  accommodations  to  eighteen  patients. 
There  is  also  a  large,  well  lighted  operating  room  and  the  five  physicians  of 
Snohomish  practice  here  independently  or  collectively  as  the  situation  demands. 
Miss  Nicholson  is  a  graduate  nurse  and  after  purchasing  the  institution  contin- 


40  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

ually  worked  for  its  betterment,  for  the  adoption  of  higher  sanitary  ideals  and 
for  improvement  along  every  possible  line. 

Miss  Nicholson  comes  from  Revolutionary  stock,  her  forefathers  on  both 
sides  serving  with  distinction  in  the  war  for  independence.  She  was  born  at 
Pomeroy,  Ohio,  May  4,  1890,  and  is  a  daughter  of  H.  M.  and  N.  Jane  (Ander- 
son) Nicholson,  w^ho  were  natives  of  A'irginia  and  Ohio  respectively.  Her 
maternal  grandfather  was  Hiram  Anderson,  an  early  settler  of  Ohio,  emigrating 
to  that  state  when  it  was  largely  an  unbroken  wilderness.  He  bought  land  for 
six  dollars  per  acre  and  lived  thereon  throughout  his  remaining  days.  Miss 
Nicholson's  father  became  a  well  known  stationary  engineer  and  followed  that 
business  in  Ohio  for  many  years  but  in  1900  removed  with  his  family  to  Wash- 
ington, establishing  his  residence  in  Everett,  where  he  still  makes  his  home.  He 
is  now  fifty-seven  years  of  age  and  is  yet  active  in  his  profession.  His  wife  is 
living  at  the  age  of  fifty  years.  In  their  family  were  three  daughters :  Mrs, 
Mabel  C.  Hennessy,  now  a  resident  of  Seattle;  Miss  L.  C.  Nicholson  of  this 
review ;  and  Mrs.  Otto  Schultz,  residing  in  Portland,  Oregon. 

Miss  Nicholson  attended  school  in  Ohio  and  in  Everett  and  when  her  general 
education  was  completed  entered  a  hospital  at  Vancouver,  British  Columbia,  there 
pursuing  her  studies  and  training  until  she  received  her  certificate  as  a  graduate 
nurse.     Two  years  ago  she  purchased  the  Snohomish  General  Hospital. 


EDWARD  ELDRIDGE. 


Macaulay  has  said  that  the  history  of  a  country  is  best  told  in  the  lives  of 
its  people  and  an  important  chapter  in  the  hi^ory  of  western  Washington  is 
that  constituted  in  the  life  record  of  Edward  Eldridge,  who  established  one  of 
the  pioneer  homes  on  Bellingham  bay  and  from  that  period  forward  to  the 
time  of  his  death,  which  occurred  in  1892,  was  closely  associated  with  many 
events  which  marked  the  progress  and  upbuilding  of  the  district.  Moreover,  he 
also  left  the. impress  of  his  ability  and  individuality  upon  the  legislative  records 
of  the  state  and  was  a  member  of  two  of  its  constitutional  conventions.  His 
purpose  was  ever  as  honorable  as  it  was  strong,  his  ideals  were  high  and  never 
were  his  interests  so  self-centered  that  he  could  not  reach  out  a  helping  hand  to 
assist  another  who  was  struggling  to  gain  a  financial  foothold. 

Mr.  Eldridge  was  born  at  St.  Andrews,  Scotland,  December  7,  1829,  and 
at  an  early  age  was  left  an  orphan,  so  that  little  is  known  concerning  the  fam- 
ily, but  the  Scotch  characteristics  of  thrift  and  integrity  seemed  inherent  in  him. 
There  was  a  large  family  of  brothers  and  sisters  but  they  became  scattered. 
Following  the  death  of  his  parents  Edward  Eldridge  went  to  live  with  his  grand- 
parents, but  when  eleven  years  of  age,  stimulated  by  a  desire  to  see  something 
of  the  world,  he  ran  away  from  home  and  went  to  sea.  His  educational  oppor- 
tunities were  necessarily  limited  but  throughout  his  life  he  remained  a  close 
student  of  books  and  a  keen  observer  of  men  and  measures,  to  which  he  added 
a  retentive  memory  that  gave  him  in  the  course  of  years  a  mind  well  stored 
with  much  valuable  information,  gleaned  here  and  there  in  the  school  of  experi- 


EDWAED  ELDRIDGE 


^^^^^''^f't^WmKi^m 


'   THE  NEW  YORK    "^ 
PUBLIC  LIBRARY 


ASTOR,    LENOX 
TILDEN  FOUNDATION 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  43 

ence.  It  has  been  said  that:  "The  ocean  is  a  master  of  mathematics,"  and 
Edward  Eldridge  mastered  that  science  in  the  course  of  his  experience  as  a  nav- 
igator. He  shipped  before  the  mast  on  merchant  vessels  and  also  served  with 
the  English  navy  and  thus  he  visited  many  countries,  where  he  became  familiar 
with  strange  lands  and  peoples. 

He  paid  his  first  visit  to  America  in  1846,  when  a  youth  of  seventeen,  being 
one  of  the  crew  of  a  small  vessel  that  took  on  a  cargo  of  mahogany  at  Hon- 
duras. While  the  vessel  was  loading  a  timber  struck  him  on  the  head,  rendering 
him  unconscious,  and  the  captain,  supposing  him  to  be  dead,  had  him  laid  out 
for  burial  at  sea,  but  the  captain  of  another  ship  heard  of  the  accident  and 
requested  permission  to  have  the  injury  examined.  The  result  was  that  it  was 
found  that  life  was  not  extinct  and  the  little  vessel  therefore  did  not  lose  a 
member  of  its  crew.  For  a  time  Mr.  Eldridge  was  a  sailor  on  the  Great  Lakes 
and  again  upon  the  broad  seas  and  at  different  periods  he  engaged  in  mining! 
In  October,  1849,  following  the  discovery  of  gold  in  California,  he  disembarked 
from  the  Tonquin  at  San  Francisco  and  made  his  way  to  the  gold  fields  at 
Yuba,  California,  spending  twelve  months  as  a  miner  on  Feather  river.  He  then 
became  second  mate  on  the  Pacific  Mail  Steamship  Tennessee,  which  sailed 
from  San  Francisco  to  Panama.  While  on  one  of  those  trips  he  formed  the 
acquaintance  of  a  most  attractive  little  Irish  lady,  Teresa  Lappin,  and  this 
acquaintance  turned  the  current  of  his  life.  Resigning  his  position  on  the  Ten- 
nessee, he  wedded  the  lady  and  they  made  their  way  to  the  mining  district  of 
Yreka,  California,  in  the  spring  of  1852.  As  Mr.  Eldridge  was  not  successful 
in  the  mines  he  resolved  to  go  to  Australia,  accompanied  by  his  wife  and  the 
baby  daughter  who  was  then  a  member  of  the  household,  but  a  seemingly  trivial 
incident  directed  his  labors  elsewhere.  While  waiting  for  a  ship  to  take  them  • 
to  Australia  Mr.  Eldridge  chanced  to  meet  Captain  Henry  Roeder,  a  former 
Great  Lakes  captain,  whom  he  had  known  and  who  was  then  purchasing  saw- 
mill machinery  in  San  Francisco  with  the  object  of  installing  it  in  a  mill  on 
Bellingham  bay.  At  that  time  western  Washington  was  largely  peopled  by  the 
Indians,  there  being  few  white  men,  so  that  labor  was  very  scarce.  After  tell- 
ing Mr.  Eldridge  of  the  beauties  of  the  Puget  Sound  country  and  its  splendid 
natural  resources  he  induced  him  to  abandon  his  idea  of  raising  cattle  in  Aus- 
tralia and  accept  a  position  in  the  Roeder  mill.  They  made  their  way  to 
Bellingham  bay  and  Mrs.  Eldridge  was  the  first  white  woman  to  locate  in  the 
district.  While  Mr.  Eldridge  worked  in  the  sawmill  Mrs.  Eldridge  provided  the 
meals  for  the  men  who  were  employed  with  her  husband  and  continued  to 
board  his  business  associates  after  he  took  up  work  in  the  coal  mines.  Later 
Mr.  Eldridge  taught  school  and  in  the  meantime  the  little  boarding  house  was 
converted  into  a  hotel,  thus  meeting  the  demands  of  the  district,  which  was 
steadily  developing.  On  coming  to  Washington  Mr.  Eldridge  secured  a  dona- 
tion claim  of  three  hundred  and  twenty  acres  adjoining  the  claim  of  Captain 
Roeder  and  fronting  on  the  bay.  It  was  covered  with  a  dense  growth  of  timber 
and  underbrush,  so  that  much  arduous  labor  was  required  to  clear  and  develop 
it,  but  his  unremitting  industry  and  diligence  at  length  resulted  in  the  develop- 
ment of  one  of  the  best  farms  on  the  Sound.  As  the  towns  on  the  bay  grew  in 
population  he  at  different  periods  platted  considerable  portions  of  the  farm  for 
residential  districts  and  realized  a  handsome  fortune  from  the  sale  of  the  lots. 

Vol.  II— 3 


44  WASHINGTOX,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

He  built  upon  that  place  in  later  years  one  of  the  finest  homes  in  the  city,  cost- 
ing about  fifty  thousand  dollars. 

Mr.  Eldridge,  possessing  characteristic  Scotch  thrift,  neglected  no  business 
opportunity  that  he  believed  would  contribute  to  his  own  fortunes  or  to  the 
development  of  the  community.  As  the  population  increased  and  the  interests 
became  more  complex  he  saw  and  utilized  opportunities  for  the  establishment 
of  business  enterprises  which  later-day  conditions  demanded,  and  something  of 
the  extent,  volume  and  importance  of  his  business  is  indicated  in  the  fact  that 
at  the  time  of  his  demise  he  was  president  of  the  Bellingham  Bay  National 
Bank;  president  of  the  Bellingham  Bay  Gas  Company;  president  of  the  Belling- 
ham Bay  Land  Company ;  president  of  the  Bellingham  Bay  &  Eastern  Railroad 
Company ;  a  director  of  the  Fairhaven  &  New  Whatcom  Street  Railway  Com- 
pany; and  a  director  of  the  Puget  Sound  Loan,  Trust  &  Banking  Company. 
With  the  establishment  and  growth  of  other  large  business  and  industrial  en- 
terprises he  was  also  connected  and  he  figured  prominently  in  the  development 
of  the  lumber  industry  as  one  of  the  partners  in  the  Bartlett  &  Eldridge  sawmill, 
which  was  sold  to  the  E.  K.  Wood  Lumber  Company  in  1900. 

Another  phase  of  his  activity  had  to  do  with  the  civic  organization  of  the 
district  consequent  upon  the  growth  in  population.  The  county  was  established 
and  in  time  the  city  was  incorporated  and  so  long  and  prominently  had  Mr. 
Eldridge  been  connected  with  public  affairs  that  he  was  naturally  called  upon  to 
serve  in  positions  of  public  trust.  He  filled  the  office  of  county  commissioner, 
county  auditor,  county  treasurer,  deputy  collector  of  customs  and  several  times 
represented  his  district  in  the  Washington  legislature  during  the  territorial  regime. 
He  presided  over  the  deliberations  of  the  house  in  1866-67  as  its  speaker  and 
the  fairness  and  impartiality  w^hich  characterized  him  in  every  relation  w^ere 
manifest  in  his  parliamentary  rulings.  In  1878  he  was  one  of  the  three  delegates 
at  large  in  the  territorial  constitutional  convention  at  Walla  Walla,  and  in  1889 
was  a  member  of  the  state  constitutional  convention  at  Olympia.  He  was  chair- 
man of  the  convention  that  nominated  Denny,  Flanders  and  Garfielde  for  con- 
gress and  in  1892  he  represented  Washington  in  the  republican  national 
convention,  which  met  in  Minneapolis.  Speaking  of  his  public  service,  a 
contemporary  writer  said :  "He  never  wooed  public  ofiice,  and  responded  to 
the  call  of  his  fellow  citizens  in  the  spirit  of  duty.  Indeed  he  might  have  made 
a  brilliant  political  career  but  for  his  manifold  business  interests  and  love  of 
literature.  It  is  said  that  he  had  been  a  lifelong  democrat  up  to  the  time  news 
came  verifying  the  report  that  Fort  Sumter  had  been  fired  upon.  Then  he 
repudiated  the  party  as  the  author  of  rebellion  and  never  returned  to  its  ranks. 
As  a  republican  he  was  not  a  bitter  partisan,  but  a  conscientious  worker  and  a 
broad-minded  citizen." 

Although  his  ])ublic  and  business  interests  constantly  made  greater  and 
greater  demands  upon  his  time  and  attention  Mr.  Eldridge  always  felt  that  his 
interests  centered  in  his  own  household.  His  family  numbered  two  sons  and 
two  daughters:  Isabella  M.,  who  was  born  in  Yreka,  California,  and  was  the 
wife  of  Senator  J.  J.  Edens,  of  Skagit  county,  Washington,  both  of  whom  are 
now  deceased;  Edward,  who  was  born  in  Bellingham  and  died  in  August,  1868; 
Alice,  who  was  born  in  Bellingham,  became  the  wife  of  James  Gilligan,  of  Skagit 
county,  and  died  February  3,  1886;  and  Hugh,  who  is  today  the  sole  representa- 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  45 

tive  of  the  family  in  Bellingham.  The  death  of  the  husband  and  father  occurred 
October  12,  1892.  In  his  Hfetime  his  studious  habits  had  grown  and  he  had 
surrounded  himself  with  a  magnificent  library,  with  the  contents  of  which  he 
was  largely  familiar.  It  constituted  one  of  the  chief  attractions  of  his  beau- 
tiful home  and  it  seemed  most  deplorable  when,  a  short  time  after  the  death  of 
Mr.  Eldridge,  his  home  with  its  thousands  of  volumes  was  destroyed  by  fire. 
When  he  passed  away  the  press  of  the  state  commented  widely  upon  his  life  in 
its  great  usefulness  and  its  worth  to  the  commonwealth.  It  was  said  that: 
"Every  changing  condition  found  him  ready  and  in  the  forefront  of  progress. 
Whether  it  was  a  matter  of  personal  enterprise  or  of  public  weal  he  was  active, 
wide-awake,  constructive  all  of  the  time."  The  extent  of  his  influence  and  work 
is  almost  immeasurable.  There  is  practically  no  phase  of  the  development  of 
the  Bellingham  bay  district  with  which  he  was  not  closely  associated  and  his 
labors  were  even  of  greater  extent,  for  his  business  connections  reached  out 
into  other  quarters  and  his  activities  touched  the  general  interests  of  society, 
leaving  their  impress  not  only  upon  the  development  of  the  hour  but  upon 
future  growth  and  greatness.  To  realize  what  were  his  early  surroundings  and 
his  almost  utter  lack  of  advantages  and  opportunities  is  to  come  to  some  under- 
standing of  the  splendid  work  which  he  accomplished,  building  a  fortune,  but 
building  even  better  than  that — a  character  that  would  bear  the  closest  investi- 
gation and  scrutiny  and  shone  most  resplendent  in  the  clear  light  of  day. 


FREDERICK  HARRISON  WHITWORTH. 

Frederick  Harrison  Whitworth,  a  civil  and  mining  engineer,  now  a  resident 
of  Washington,  his  professional  operations  having  largely  been  confined  to  this 
state  and  to  Alaska,  was  born  March  25,  1846,  in  New  Albany,  Indiana.  His 
father,  the  Rev.  George  F.  Whitworth,  D.  D.,  was  a  native  of  Boston,  England, 
born  in  1816,  and  in  1832  he  came  to  the  new  world.  He  wedded  Mary  Eliza- 
beth Thomson,  who  was  born  in  Kentucky  in  1818  and  was  of  Scotch-Irish 
parentage.  After  living  in  the  middle  west  for  some  years  the  parents  came  with 
their  family  to  Washington,  crossing  the  plains  in  1853  and  settling  first  at 
Olympia,  where  they  resided  until  1865,  and  later  at  Seattle. 

Liberal  educational  advantages  were  accorded  Frederick  H.  Whitworth,  who 
attended  the  University  of  California,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  1871 
with  the  Bachelor  of  Arts  degree,  while  in  1872  the  Master  of  Arts  degree  was 
conferred  upon  him.  Having  qualified  by  a  thorough  college  training  for  the 
profession  of  civil  and  mining  engineering,  he  entered  actively  upon  his  chosen 
life  work  and  has  been  connected  with  various  important  engineering  projects 
both  in  Washington  and  Alaska  leading  to  the  development  of  the  natural  re- 
sources of  the  country.  He  has  been  particularly  active  as  an  engineer  in  con- 
nection with  coal-mining  and  railroad  interests  and  the  importance  of  the  work 
which  he  has  executed  places  him  in  a  conspicuous  and  honored  position  among 
the  representatives  of  the  profession  in  the  northwest. 

In  1881,  in  Seattle,  Mr.  Whitworth  was  married  to  Miss  Ada  Jane  Storey 
and  they  have  a  son,  Frederick  Harrison  Whitworth,  Jr.,  who  wedded  Laura 


46  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

Jane  Matthews.  ]\Ir.  and  ]\Irs.  Whitworth  hold  membership  in  the  First  Presby- 
terian church  of  Seattle.  Flis  political  faith  is  that  of  the  republican  party,  but 
the  honors  and  emoluments  of  office  have  had  no  attraction  for  him,  his  energies 
and  interests  being  concentrated  upon  his  profession.  He  is  not  remiss  in  the 
duties  of  citizenship,  however,  finding  time  and  opportunity  to  aid  in  furthering 
many  plans  for  the  public  good  which  have  had  a  direct  and  important  bearing 
upon  the  welfare  and  upbuilding  of  city  and  state  along  material,  political  and 
moral  lines. 


JOHN  SHERMAN  BAKER. 

A  prominent  figure  in  financial  circles  of  Tacoma  is  John  Sherman  Baker  of 
the  Fidelity  Trust  Company,  and  his  influence  is  one  of  broadening  activity  and 
strength  in  the  field  in  which  he  operates.  He  was  born  in  Cleveland,  Ohio, 
November  21,  1861,  and  in  the  paternal  line  comes  of  English  ancestrv',  the 
founder  of  the  American  branch  of  the  family  being  Edward  Baker,  who  came 
to  this  country  from  London,  England,  with  George  Winthrop  and  settled  at 
Salem,  Massachusetts,  in  1628. 

Asahel  M.  Baker,  father  of  John  S.  Baker,  was  born  in  Ohio  and  became  a 
wholesale  flour  dealer  of  Chicago,  while  during  the  early  '50s  he  was  a  member 
of  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade,  well  known  in  that  connection  for  a  considerable 
period.  In  fact  he  was  among  the  very  successful  merchants  of  Chicago,  where 
he  resided  for  a  long  period,  removing  to  Tacoma  in  1889,  since  which  time  he 
has  here  lived  retired.  He  married  >\Iartha  P.  Sprague,  a  native  of  Troy,  New 
York,  and  a  daughter  of  Otis  Sprague,  who  was  also  of  English  descent.  The 
family  were  early  settlers  of  Massachusetts,  arriving  in  this  country  in  the 
decade  of  1660  or  1670.  Mrs.  Asahel  Baker  also  survives  and  is  living  in 
Tacoma.  In  the  family  are  three  children :  Asahel  Sprague,  a  resident  of 
Chicago ;  John  Sherman,  of  this  review ;  and  Mattie,  the  wife  of  Arthur  G. 
Prichard,  likewise  a  resident  of  Tacoma. 

John  Sherman  Baker  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Chicago  and 
started  out  in  the  business  world  when  sixteen  years  of  age,  making  his  initial 
step  as  settling  clerk  of  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade,  in  which  connection  he 
was  retained  for  four  years.  In  1881  he  came  to  Tacoma  and  was  employed 
in  a  clerical  capacity  at  the  freight  office  of  the  Northern  Pacific  Railroad  Com- 
pany. He  was  associated  with  the  railroad  for  only  a  short  period  and  next 
engaged  in  survey  work  in  eastern  Washington  until  September,  1882,  when 
he  became  connected  with  a  general  merchandise  enterprise  at  Carbonado,  Wash- 
ington, as  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Barlow  &  Baker.  He  continued  successfully 
in  that  line  until  1883  and  in  August  of  that  year  purchased  the  established 
grocery  store  of  Relmrd  iH:  Campbell,  after  which  he  conducted  the  business 
under  the  firm  name  of  John  S.  Baker  &  Company.  He  continued  actively  in 
that  field  until  1889,  after  which  he  organized  the  Tacoma  Grocery  Company, 
Inc.,  for  the  conduct  of  a  wholesale  business.  Mr.  Baker  became  treasurer  of 
the  new  company  and  continued  in  that  connection  for  two  years.  During  that 
period   he   also    had    important    realty    and    other   business    interests    and   thus 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  47 

through  the  steps  of  an  orderly  progression  he  was  led  to  a  prominent  place  in 
,  financial  circles.  In  1889  he  organized  the  Fidelity  Trust  Company  and  became 
its  first  vice  president,  in  which  connection  he  continued  until  1904,  when  he 
was  elected  to  the  presidency  and  has  since  remained  at  the  head  of  the  business, 
wisely  and  carefully  directing  its  policies  and  managing  its  business  interests. 
He  is  likewise  a  director  in  other  banks  of  the  state  and  is  a  very  prominent 
and  well  known  figure  in  financial  circles.  He  is  seldom  in  error  in  matters  of 
judgment  when  passing  upon  the  value  of  any  business  opportunity,  and  his 
keen  insight  into  business  situations  has  materially  increased  the  success  of 
the  company  of  which  he  is  now  the  head. 

On  the  I2th  of  May.  1887,  at  Oakland,  California,  Mr.  Baker  was  married 
to  Miss  Laura  Ainsworth,  a  native  of  Portland,  Oregon,  and  a  daughter  of  the 
late  Captain  John  C.  Ainsworth.  who  was  organizer  and  president  of  the  old 
Oregon  Steam  Navigation  Company  and  one  of  the  prominent  pioneer  settlers 
and  business  men  of  Portland.  He  built  the  first  steamboat  on  the  Willamette 
river  and  was  actively  identified  with  navigation  interests  in  that  section  of  the 
country.  Mrs.  Baker  died,  leaving  one  daughter,  Bernice  Ainsworth,  whose 
activities  in  charitable  work  are  well  known.  Mr.  Baker  was  married  March 
22,  1916.  to  Miss  Florence  Mackey,  a  native  of  Tacoma  and  a  daughter  of  Rev. 
W.  A.  Mackey,  one  of  the  early  pastors  of  the  First  Presbyterian  church  of  this 
city. 

Politically  Mr.  Baker  is  a  supporter  of  the  republican  party  and  has  taken  a 
great  interest  in  politics.  He  served  as  state  senator  from  1889  until  1903,  being 
the  first  to  represent  Pierce  county  in  the  upper  house  after  the  admission  of 
Washington  into  the  Union.  He  is  a  life  member  of  Tacoma  Lodge,  No.  2t,, 
F.  &  A.  M.,  and  he  belongs  also  to  the  Commercial  Club,  the  Union  Club,  and 
the  Country  and  Golf  Clubs  of  Tacoma.  He  also  has  membership  in  the  State 
and  National  Bankers  Associations  and  is  regarded  as  a  strong  and  resourceful 
figure  in  banking  circles  on  the  coast. 


FRANK  GROUNDWATER. 

Frank  Groundwater  occupies  a  position  of  leadership  in  financial  circles  in 
Elma  and  his  public  spirit  as  well  as  his  business  success  marks  him  as  one  of 
the  most  prominent  and  influential  residents  of  that  place.  He  was  born  in  F.au 
Claire.  Wisconsin,  March  2,  1874,  and  continued  his  education  in  the  public 
schools  there  until  he  was  graduated  from  the  high  school.  He  afterward 
attended  the  Lampher  Business  College  of  Eau  Claire  and  for  a  number  of  years 
was  employed  as  a  stenographer  in  a  law  office.  While  still  residing  in  his  native 
city  he  was  elected  alderman  from  the  seventh  ward  and  resigned  that  ]:)osition 
to  remove  to  the  west.  In  1900  he  was  a  student  in  the  law  school  of  the  Uni- 
versity of  Washington,  from  which  he  was  gradviated  with  the  LL.  B.  degree  in 
1901,  having  previously  entered  upon  his  law  studies  while  in  liis  native  city. 
He  is  the  only  one  who  has  ever  completed  the  law  course  in  the  Uni\'ersity  of 
Washington  in  a  year  and  he  was  a  member  of  its  first  law  class. 

On  the  27th  of  May,   1903,  Mr.  Groundwater  removed  to  Elma,  wliere  he 


48  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

opened  an  office  and  has  since  engaged  in  active  practice,  his  ability  being  man- 
ifest in  his  resourcefuhiess  and  in  the  strength  and  abiHty  with  which  he  presents 
his  argument  and  defines  the  points  in  his  case.  He  was  the  first  town  attorney 
of  Oakville,  Washington,  which  position  he  filled  for  two  years,  and  he  is  now- 
serving  for  the  seventh  year  as  town  attorney  of  Elma.  In  addition  to  his  law 
practice  he  engages  in  the  real  estate  business,  handling  big  timber  deals  in  Wash- 
ington and  Oregon,  and  he  also  owns  one  of  the  finest  farms  in  Thurston  county, 
upon  which  is  still  seen  an  old  blockhouse  built  there  for  protection  against  the 
Indians. 

On  the  17th  of  July,  1910,  Mr.  Groundwater  was  married  to  Miss  Fannie 
Wellman,  who  was  born  October  5,  1884,  in  Tumwater,  Washington,  the  daugh- 
ter of  Charles  K.  and  Lillie  Wellman.  The  Wellmans  crossed  the  plains  witli 
ox  teams  in  early  pioneer  times  and  the  family  home  was  established  at  Tum- 
water. It  was  there  that  the  parents  of  Mrs.  Groundwater  were  married.  Her 
maternal  grandfather  was  Dr.  Joseph  Brown,  one  of  the  earliest  physicians  of 
Washington  territory.  To  ]\Ir.  and  Mrs.  Groundwater  has  been  born  a  son. 
Lyle  Frank,  born  May  12,  1916.  Their  home  is  most  attractive  by  reason  of  its 
warm-hearted  hospitality  and  they  are  very  popular  in  social  circles. 

Fraternally  Mr.  Groundwater  is  connected  with  the  Odd  Fellows  and  his 
political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican  party,  but  the  only  offices  which  he 
has  filled  have  been  in  the  strict  path  of  his  profession.  It  is  well  known  that 
his  influence  on  behalf  of  public  progress  and  improvement  is  most  marked  and 
that  his  efforts  in  that  direction  are  untiring.  He  is  now  secretary  of  the  Elma 
Business  Men's  Association,  which  is  the  successor  of  the  Elma  Merchants  Asso- 
ciation, of  which  he  was  the  secretary  for  ten  years.  He  looks  at  vital  prob- 
lems from  no  narrow  or  contracted  standpoint  but  is  a  broad-minded  man  of 
clear  vision  and  of  strong  and  honorable  purpose  who  realizes  the  duties  and 
obligations  as  well  as  the  privileges  of  citizenship,  who  holds  to  high  profes- 
sional ideals  and  who  is  most  loyal  to  the  ties  of  home  and  friendship. 


FRANK  R.  PENDLETON. 

Frank  R.  Pendleton,  of  Everett,  is  prominently  associated  with  an  industry 
which  has  been  one  of  W^ashington's  chief  sources  of  wealth,  for  he  is  now 
extensively  and  successfully  engaged  in  dealing  in  timber  lands  and  in  lumber. 
His  plans  have  ever  been  carefully  formed  and  promptly  executed  and  he  has 
ever  recognized  the  fact  that  when  one  avenue  of  opportunity  has  seemed  closed, 
it  is  possible  to  carve  out  another  path  whereby  to  reach  the  desired  goal. 

Mr.  Pendleton  was  born  in  Oconto.  W'isconsin,  July  29,  1864,  a  son  of  Charles 
T.  Pendleton,  a  native  of  Maine,  who  removed  to  Wisconsin  in  the  early  '50s, 
becoming  a  pioneer  settler  of  that  state,  where  he  operated  successfully  as  a 
lumberman.  He  was  of  English  descent,  tracing  his  ancestry  from  Bryan  Pen- 
dleton, who  was  the  founder  of  the  American  branch  of  the  family.  In  the  year 
1895  Charles  T.  Pendleton  removed  westward  to  Washington,  settling  in  Everett, 
where  he  lived  retired,  there  passing  away  in  1908,  at  the  age  of  seventy-seven 
years.     In  early  manhood  he  wedded  Almeda  Lindsey,  a  native  of  Maine  and 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  49 

a  representative  of  an  old  family  of  that  state  of  English  lineage.  She  died  in 
Everett  in  1915,  and  though  she  had  reached  the  advanced  age  of  eighty  years, 
she  met  an  accidental  death  in  an  automobile  wreck.  In  the  familv  were  five 
sons  and  three  daughters. 

Frank  R.  Pendleton,  the  fourth  in  order  of  birth,  obtained  his  education  in 
the  public  schools  of  Wisconsin  and  in  a  business  college  at  Oshkosh,  that  state. 
When  twenty  years  of  age  he  started  out  in  life  on  his  own  account,  being  em- 
ployed by  his  father  to  take  contracts  in  connection  with  the  lumber  business. 
He  had  previously  worked  in  the  lumber  woods  of  Wisconsin  from  the  age  of 
eighteen  years  and  his  broad  experience  has  made  him  thoroughly  acquainted 
with  every  phase  of  the  business  and  he  has  become  an  expert  lumberman,  his 
opinions  being  the  result  of  long  training  and  broad  experience.  He  became  a 
resident  of  Everett  in  the  fall  of  1899.  Several  years  before,  however,  he  had 
come  to  the  northwest  as  a  timber  cruiser  and  had  secured  timber  lands  in  this 
section  of  the  country.  In  the  year  mentioned  he  began  operations  in  the  busi- 
ness of  logging  and  handling  timber  lands  in  Oregon,  Washington,  British 
Columbia  and  Mexico.  He  is  today  one  of  the  largest  operators  in  his  line  in 
this  section  of  the  country,  and  in  addition  to  his  activities  in  the  northwest,  the 
firm  with  which  he  is  connected  owns  large  tracts  in  Minnesota,  Wisconsin  and 
Michigan.  The  business  is  carried  on  under  the  name  of  Pendleton  &  Gilkey 
and  also  under  the  name  of  the  Pendleton  Lumber  Company,  with  headquarters 
at  Everett,  Mr.  Pendleton  being  president  and  manager  of  the  company.  He  is 
likewise  president  and  general  manager  of  the  Straits  Lumber  Company,  presi- 
dent and  general  manager  of  the  Union  Timber  Company  and  president  and 
general  manager  of  the  Coquille  Timber  Company,  all  of  which  indicates  the 
extensiveness  of  his -operations  in  connection  with  the  lumber  industry.  He  is 
among  those  who  have  most  comprehensive  knowledge  of  the  business  in  the 
northwest  and  his  work  has  been  fruitful  of  splendid  results.  He  has  not  con- 
fined his  attention  alone  to  this  line,  for  he  is  a  director  of  the  First  National 
Bank  of  Everett,  a  director  of  the  Pacific  Grocery  Company  and  of  the  Pacific 
Importing  Company,  making  imports  from  the  Orient.  His  judgment  is  at  all 
times  sound  and  his  discrimination  keen  and  he  seems  to  accomplish  at  any  one 
point  in  his  career  the  possibility  for  successful  accomplishment  at  that  point. 

In  1888,  at  Gillett,  Wisconsin,  Mr.  Pendleton  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Ella  G.  Runkel,  a  native  of  Wisconsin  and  a  daughter  of  Louis  and  Christina 
Runkel.  They  now  have  seven  children,  namely :  Ross,  Verna,  Wayne,  Brooks, 
Norma,  Francis  and  Crosby. 

Politically  Mr.  Pendleton  has  become  progressive  and  is  very  active  in  the 
councils  of  the  party.  He  has  served  as  alderman  in  Everett  and  as  a  member 
of  the  school  board  and  his  aid  and  cooperation  can  always  be  counted  upon  to 
further  any  well  defined  plan  or  movement  for  the  benefit  and  upbuilding  of  his 
city.  He  was  made  a  Mason  in  Wisconsin  and  he  has  taken  the  fourteenth 
degree  in  the  Lodge  of  Perfection  in  the  Scottish  Rite.  His  religious  belief  is 
that  of  the  Christian  Science  church.  He  belongs  to  the  Everett  Commercial 
Club,  to  the  Cascade  Club,  the  Everett  Country  and  Golf  Club  and  the  Seattle 
Country  and  Golf  Club.  His  influence  is  always  on  the  side  of  progress  and 
improvement  in  every  relation.  He  received  no  financial  aid  at  the  outset  of  his 
career  but  had  the  thorough  preliminary  training  that  gave  him  a  solid  founda- 


50  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

tion  upon  which  to  build  his  later  success.  Opportunity  called  forth  his  latent 
powers  and  ambition  and  prompted  him  to  so  exercise  his  talents  that  he  is  today 
one  of  the  most  prominent  and  prosperous  representatives  of  the  timber  interests 
of  the  northwest. 


FRED  R.  BROWN. 


Fred  R.  Brown,  for  forty-six  years  a  resident  of  Washington,  is  now  president 
of  the  Case  Shingle  &  Lumber  Company  of  Raymond,  in  which  connection  he  has 
become  a  prominent  and  well  known  representative  of  an  industry  which  has 
constituted  a  most  important  contributing  factor  to  the  prosperity  and  business 
upbuilding  of  the  state.  He  has  lived  in  Raymond  since  1904  and  has  long  been 
honored  as  one  of  its  most  prominent  and  valued  citizens.  He  comes  from  a  state 
which  was  a  center  of  the  lumber  trade  long  before  settlement  was  made  on  the 
Pacific  coast,  for  his  birth  occurred  in  Bucksport,  Maine,  May  10,  1849.  His 
boyhood  was  passed  in  that  state,  where  he  attended  the  common  schools 
and  he  also  spent  one  year  as  a  student  in  the  East  Maine  Conference. 
Seminary.  He  afterward  went  to  Boston,  where  he  was  employed  for  two 
years.  He  reached  the  age  of  twenty  when  in  1869  he  made  his  way  to  the 
Pacific  coast  with  California  as  his  destination.  After  a  brief  period  spent  at 
farm  labor  in  that  state  he  removed  to  Portland,  Oregon,  where  he  remained 
through  the  winter.  The  following  year  he  went  to  Kalama,  where  he  engaged  in 
cutting  cord  wood  and  he  also  worked  in  a  store  and  assisted  in  road  building  and 
other  work  until  1871,  when  he  came  to  Washington,  making  his  way  to  Tenino. 
For  a  time  he  was  employed  as  a  clerk  in  a  store  but  later  was  persuaded  to 
purchase  the  business  by  his  employer,  who  desired  to  retire.  He  secured  the 
stock  of  goods  and  business  largely  on  credit  but  made  good  in  the  undertaking, 
winning  a  liberal  patronage  and  expanding  his  interests  to  meet  the  growing 
demands  of  the  trade.  He  became  recognized  as  a  leading  citizen  of  the  commu- 
nity not  only  by  reason  of  his  success  in  the  store  but  also  in  other  lines.  He  filled 
the  position  of  postmaster  there  for  a  few  years,  was  notary  public  and  in  many 
other  ways  participated  in  activities  leading  to  the  upbuilding  and  development  of 
his  section  of  the  state.  He  also  became  one  of  the  owners  and  manager  of  the 
Olympia  &  Tenino  Railway  and  in  1880  removed  to  Olympia,  where  he  resided 
until  he  became  identified  with  the  interests  of  Raymond  in  1904. 

Mr.  Brown  was  active  in  organizing  the  Sash  &  Door  Company  at  Bucoda 
and  there  with  others  built  two  sawmills  and  operated  one  of  the  largest  sash  and 
door  factories  on  the  coast  at  that  time.  Doors  and  sash  were  then  made  exclu- 
sively of  cedar,  as  it  was  believed  that  fir  could  not  be  utilized  for  that  purpose. 
At  Bucoda  the  company  also  operated  a  coal  mine,  which  they  continued  to  work 
for  several  years.  Mr.  Brown  likewise  developed  a  fine  farm  near  Tenino  and 
it  is  still  known  as  the  Brown  farm,  although  he  sold  it  some  time  ago.  He 
became  associated  with  Elmer  E.  Case,  in  the  building  of  the  Case  shingle  and 
lumber  mills  Nos.  i,  2  and  3  at  Raymond.  He  is  also  secretary  of  the  Southwest 
Manufacturing  Company  in  all  of  these  plants,  the  most  modern  and  highly 
improved  machinery  has  been  installed,  the  work  being  thus  facilitated.     Those 


FRED  R.  BROWN 


'^mi^mmt^m 


THE  NEW  YORkT' 
PUBLIC  LIBRARTi 

TILDEN  Fou.MD  '  TroNJ 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  53 

at  all  familiar  with  the  lumber  industry  in  Washington  recognize  that  the  Case 
Company  has  taken  an  active  part  in  the  development  of  the  state  in  that  line,  and 
Mr.  Brown  is  president  of  the  company.  He  is  also  the  president  of  the  Lebam 
Mill  &  Timber  Company  at  Lebam,  Washington,  and  he  has  been  very  active  in 
promoting  building  interests,  thus  contributing  in  large  measure  to  the  develop- 
ment of  different  districts.  He  is  now  engaged  in  developing  an  eleven  hundred 
acre  cattle  ranch  near  Tokeland,  upon  which  he  has  a  iine  herd  of  roan  Durhams 
which  he  is  raising  for  beef  cattle.  He  has  diked  and  ditched  the  land  and  has 
thus  greatly  enhanced  its  value. 

Mr.  Brown  has  been  married  twice.  At  Tenino,  in  1875,  he  wedded  Miss 
Elizabeth  Case  and  death  terminated  a  happy  married  life  for  them  in  1891.  Ten 
years  later,  or  on  the  2d  of  March,  1901.  Mr.  Brown  wedded  Mrs.  Chloe  Jones,  a 
widow.  He  makes  his  home  a  part  of  the  time  in  Seattle,  while  the  remainder  of 
the  time  he  spends  in  Raymond,  and  in  both  places  he  is  held  in  the  highest  esteem. 

Mr.  Brown  is  connected  with  no  fraternal  organizations  and  has  never  held 
nor  desired  pubHc  office,  preferring  to  concentrate  his  energies  upon  his  business 
affairs,  which  he  has  most  successfully  and  capably  managed.  His  life  record 
proves  that  activity  does  not  tire  but  brings  power  and  the  force  of  resistance.  All 
through  his  business  career  his  interests  have  constantly  expanded  by  reason  of  his 
close  appHcation  and  intelligent  direction  of  his  efforts.  He  seems  to  possess  in 
notable  measure  the  power  to  unify  and  coordinate  seemingly  diverse  interests  and 
bring-  them  into  a  harmonious  and  resultant  whole.  Whatever  he  undertakes  he 
accomplishes,  and  each  passing  year  has  marked  with  him  a  larger  achievement 
and  farther  reaching  interests  and  business  connectionls. 


WILLIAM  T.  HOWARD. 

William  T.  Howard,  proprietor  of  the  Island  County  Times,  published  at 
Coupeville,  was  born  at  South  Haven,  Michigan,  October  24,  1858,  a  son  of 
John  and  Mary  (Fisher)  Howard,  who  were  natives  of  England.  The  father 
came  to  America  in  1851  and  settled  first  in  Canada  but  afterward  removed  to 
Michigan.  He  was  a  seafaring  man  and  spent  a  number  of  years  as  a  sailor  on 
the  Great  Lakes  but  afterward  removed  to  Nebraska,  where  he  took  up  a  home- 
stead on  which  he  lived  for  five  years,  passing  away  in  1878,  when  forty-seven 
years  of  age.  His  wife  came  to  the  United  States. with  her  parents  and  they 
were  married  in  Michigan.  She  passed  away  in  Stanton.  Nebraska,  in  1904, 
at  the  age  of  sixty-one  years. 

In  their  family  were  eight  children,  of  whom  William  T.  Howard  was  the 
first  born.  He  attended  the  country  schools  of  Michigan  and  then  took  up  the 
profession  of  teaching  in  the  rural  schools.  In  1873  he  removed  to  Nebraska 
and  while  filling  the  position  of  county  superintendent  of  schools  in  Colfax 
county  he  purchased  and  edited  the  Schuyler  Sun.  continuing  the  successful  con- 
duct of  that  paper  for  thirteen  years.  He  was  also  part  owner  and  editor  of  the 
Nebraska  School  Journal  from  June,  1889.  until  1891.  In  1899  he  was  elected 
mayor  of  Schuyler  and  afterward  was  elected  city  treasurer,  which  position  he 
filled  for  three  terms  or  until  he  resigned  preparatory  to  coming  to  Washington. 


54  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

He  made  an  excellent  official  in  both  positions,  being  actuated  by  the  utmost 
fidelity  to  duty,  with  a  practical  recognition  of  the  obligations,  the  needs  and  the 
opportunities  of  the  office. 

It  was  in  the  year  1906  that  Mr.  Howard  came  to  Washington,  making  his 
way  to  Whidbey  Island,  after  which  he  purchased  the  Island  County  Times,  of 
which  he  has  since  been  proprietor  and  publisher.  This  is  a  weekly  paper  with 
a  circulation  of  five  hundred  and  sixty,  and  his  newspaper  plant  is  thoroughly 
modern  in  its  equipment,  while  his  method  of  publication  is  such  as  is  familiar 
to  the  public  through  the  leading  journals  of  larger  cities.  In  a  word,  he  is  most 
progressive  in  his  work  and  his  labors  have  brought  substantial  returns. 

On  the  2ist  of  December.  1879,  in  Colfax  county,  Nebraska,  Mr.  Howard 
was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Esther  Edmonds,  her  parents  being  James  and 
Jane  Edmonds,  natives  of  Michigan.  The  mother  still  survives  and  makes  her 
home  at  Hastings,  Nebraska.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Howard  have  eight  children,  as 
follows:  Arthur,  who  was  born  at  Schuyler,  Nebraska,  and  who  is  now  mar- 
ried and  is  part  owner  of  the  Herald,  published  at  Mount  V^ernon,  Washington; 
Mrs.  Mabel  Beach,  who  was  also  born  at  Schuvler.  Nebraska,  and  now  resides 
in  Lynden,  W^ashington ;  James,  who  is  a  native  of  Schuyler,  Nebraska,  and  now 
makes  his  home  at  Langley  on  ^^llidbey  Island;  Mrs.  Mar)'  English,  who  was 
born  at  Schuyler  and  is  now  the  wife  of  an  officer  stationed  at  Fort  Casey,  on 
Whidbey  Island ;  William,  who  is  a  native  of  Schuyler.  Nebraska,  and  a  high 
school  graduate  and  at  the  age  of  nineteen  is  now  attending  the  University  of 
\\'ashington.;  Bernice,  a  young  lady  of  seventeen  who  was  born  in  Schuyler  and 
is  now  attending  school  at  Coupeville,  this  state ;  Chester,  whose  birth  occurred 
in  Schuyler  and  who  at  the  age  of  fifteen  years  is  now  attending  school  at  Coupe- 
ville, Washington ;  and  Marvel,  who  was  born  in  Coupeville  and  is  now  seven 
years  old  and  a  school  student. 

In  politics  ]\Ir.  Howard  is  an  independent  republican.  He  has  serv^ed  as 
president  of  the  school  board  and  as  town  clerk  but  has  preferred  to  hold  his 
political  activity  only  to  local  service.  Fraternally  he  is  connected  with  the 
Knights  of  Pythias,  the  Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen  and  the  Tribe  of 
Ben  Hur.  His  is  a  notable  example  of  what  may  be  accomplished  through 
energy,  determination  and  laudable  ambition.  He  was  given  the  opportunity  of 
attending  school  for  only  six  months  after  the  age  of  twelve,  and  the  balance 
of  his  education  has  been  acquired  by  lamplight  after  the  day's  work  was  over. 
He  has,  however,  always  been  an  earnest  and  discriminating  student,  a  broad 
reader  and  deep  thinker  and  is  always  well  informed  on  the  vital  questions  and 
issues  of  the  day. 


THOMAS  MERCER. 


Thomas  Mercer  was  born  in  Harrison  county,  Ohio,  March  11,  1813,  the 
eldest  of  a  large  family  of  children.  He  remained  with  his  father  until  he  was 
twenty-one,  gaining  a  common  school  education  and  a  thorough  knowledge  of 
the  manufacture  of  woolen  goods.  His  father  was  the  owner  of  a  well  ap- 
pointed woolen  mill.     The  father,  Aaron  Mercer,  was  born  in  \^irginia  and  was 


WASHINGTON/WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  55 

of  the  same  family  as   General   Mercer  of  Revolutionary  fame.     His  mother, 
Jane  Dickerson  Mercer,  was  born  in  Pennsylvania  of  an  old  family  of  that  state. 

The  family  moved  to  Princeton,  Illinois,  in  1834,  a  period  when  buffalo 
were  still  occasionally  found  east  of  the  Mississippi  river,  and  savage  Indians 
annoyed  and  harassed  outlying  settlements  in  that  region.  A  remarkable  co- 
incidence is  a  matter  of  family  tradition.  Nancy  Brigham,  who  later  became 
Mr.  Mercer's  wife,  and  her  family,  were  compelled  to  flee  by  night  from  their 
home  near  Dixon  at  the  time  of  the  Black  Hawk  war,  and  narrowly  escaped 
massacre.  In  1856,  about  twenty  years  later,  her  daughters,  the  youngest  only 
eight  years  old,  also  made  a  midnight  escape  in  Seattle,  two  thousand  miles 
away  from  the  scene  of  their  mother's  adventure,  and  they  endured  the  terrors 
of  the  attack  upon  the  village  a  few  days  later  when  the  shots  and  shouts  of 
hundreds  of  painted  devils  rang  out  in  the  forest  on  the  hillside  from  a  point 
near  the  present  Union  depots  to  another  near  where  Madison  street  ends  at 
First  avenue. 

In  April,  1852,  a  train  of  about  twenty  wagons,  drawn  by  horses,  was  or- 
ganized at  Princeton  to  cross  the  plains  to  Oregon.  In  this  train  were  Thomas 
Mercer,  Aaron  Mercer,  Dexter  Horton,  Daniel  Bagley,  William  H.  Shoudy, 
and  their  families.  Mr.  Mercer  was  chosen  captain  of  the  train  and  discharged 
the  arduous  duties  of  that  position  fearlessly  and  successfully.  Danger  and 
disease  were  on  both  sides  of  the  long,  dreary  way,  and  hundreds  of  new  made 
graves  were  often  counted  along  the  roadside  in  a  day.  But  this  train  seemed 
to  bear  a  charmed  existence.  Not  a  member  of  the  original  party  died  on  the 
way,  although  many  were  seriously  ill.     Only  one  animal  was  lost. 

As  the  journey  was  fairly  at  an  end  and  western  civilization  had  been 
reached  at  The  Dalles,  Oregon,  Mrs.  Mercer  was  taken  ill,  but  managed  to 
keep  up  until  the  Cascades  were  reached.  There  she  grew  rapidly  worse  and 
soon  died.  Several  members  of  the  expedition  went  to  Salem  and  wintered 
there  and  in  the  early  spring  of  1853  Thomas  Mercer  and  Dexter  Horton  came 
to  Seattle  and  decided  to  make  it  their  home.  Mr.  Horton  entered  immediately 
upon  a  business  career,  the  success  of  which  is  known  in  California,  Oregon  and 
Washington,  and  Mr.  Mercer  settled  upon  a  donation  claim  whose  eastern  end 
was  the  meander  line  of  Lake  Union  and  the  western  end,  half  way  across  to 
the  bay.  Mercer  street  is  the  dividing  line  between  his  and  D.  T.  Denny's 
claims,  and  all  of  these  tracts  were  included  within  the  city  limits  about  1885. 

Mr.  Mercer  brought  to  Seattle  one  span  of  horses  and  a  wagon  from  the 
outfit  with  which  he  crossed  the  plains  and  for  some  time  all  the  hauling  of 
wood  and  merchandise  was  done  by  him.  The  wagon  was  the  first  one  in  King 
county.  In  1859  he  went  to  Oregon  for  the  summer  and  while  there  married 
Hester  L.  Ward,  who  lived  with  him  nearly  forty  years,  dying  in  November, 
1897.  During  the  twenty  years  succeeding  his  settlement  here  he  worked  hard 
in  clearing  the  farm  and  carrying  on  dairying  and  farming  in  a  small  way  and 
doing  much  work  with  his  team.  In  1873  portions  of  the  farm  came  into 
demand  for  homes  and  his  sales  soon  put  him  in  easy  circumstances  and  in 
later  years  made  him  independent,  though  the  few  years  of  hard  times  prior  to 
his  death  left  but  a  small  part  of  the  estate. 

The  old  home  on  the  farm  that  the  Indians  spared  when  other  buildings  in 
the  county  not  protected  by   soldiers   were  burned,   stood  until    1900  and   was 


56  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

then  the  oldest  building  in  the  county.  Mr.  D.  T.  Denny  had  a  log  cabin  on 
his  place  which  was  not  destroyed — these  two  alone  escaped.  The  Indians  were 
asked,  after  the  war,  why  they  did  not  burn  Mercer's  house,  to  which  they 
replied,  "Oh,  old  Mercer  might  want  it  again."  Denny  and  Mercer  had  always 
been  particularly  kind  to  the  natives  and  just  in  their  dealings  and  the  savages 
seem  to  have  felt  some  little  gratitude  toward  them. 

In  the  early  '40s  Mr.  Mercer  and  Rev.  Daniel  Bagley  were  co-workers  in  the 
anti-slavery  cause  with  Owen  Lovejoy,  of  Princeton,  who  was  known  to  all 
men  of  that  period  in  the  great  middle  west.  Later  Mr.  Mercer  joined  the 
republican  party  and  was  ever  an  ardent  supporter  of  its  men  and  measures. 
He  served  for  ten  years  as  probate  judge  of  King  county,  and  at  the  end  of  that 
period  declined  a  renomination. 

In  early  life  he  joined  the  Methodist  Protestant  church  and  ever  continued 
a  consistent  member  of  that  body.  Rev.  Daniel  Bagley,  who  participated  in  the 
funeral  services,  was  his  pastor  fifty-two  years  earlier  at  Princeton,  Illinois,  and 
continued  to  hold  that  relation  to  him  in  Seattle  from  i860  until  1885,  when 
he  resigned  his  Seattle  pastorate. 

To  Mr.  Mercer  belongs  the  honor  of  naming  the  lakes  adjacent  to  and 
almost  surrounding  the  city.  At  a  social  gathering  or  picnic  in  1855  he  made 
a  short  address  and  proposed  the  adoption  of  "Union"  for  the  small  lake  be- 
tween the  bay  and  the  large  lake,  and  "Washington"  for  the  other  body  of 
water.  This  proposition  was  received  with  favor  and  at  once  adopted.  In  the 
early  days  of  the  county  and  city  he  was  always  active  in  all  public  enterprises, 
ready  alike  with  individual  effort  and  with  his  purse,  according  to  his  ability, 
and  no  one  of  the  city's  thousands  took  a  keener  interest  or  greater  pride  than 
he  in  the  development  of  the  city's  greatness,  although  latterly  he  could  no  longer 
share  actively  in  its  accomplishment.  He  was  exceedingly  anxious  to  see  the 
Lake  Washington  canal  completed  between  salt  water  and  the  lakes. 

Thomas  Mercer  was  born  March  11,  1813;  married  to  Nancy  Brigham,  Janu- 
ary 25,  1838 ;  died  in  Seattle,  May  25,  1898. 

Nancy  Brigham  was  born  June  6,  1816,  and  died  at  the  Cascades  of  the 
Columbia,  September  21,  1852. 

The   children  of   this   marriage   were : 

Mary  Jane,  born  January  7,  1839,  <^i^d  September  8,  1910;  Eliza  Ann,  born 
March  30,  1841,  died  October  24,  1862;  Susannah  Mercer,  born  September  30, 
1843 ;  Alice,  born  October  26,  1848. 

Thomas  Mercer  was  married  to  Hester  L.  Ward  in  Oregon  in  1859.  No 
children. 

Mary  Jane  was  married  to  Henry  G.  Parsons,  March  11,  1857. 

Their  children  were:  Flora  A.,  born  December  21,  1857;  Ella,  born  February 
15,  i860,  died  January  23,  1899;  William  M.,  born  October  27,  1862,  died  August 
4,  1897;  Alice  E.,  born  April  4,  1865;  Annie  V.,  born  May  21,  1867;  Lela  M., 
born  February  4,  1870. 

Ella  Parsons  married  David  Fleetwood,  December  25,  1880. 

Their  children  were:  David  Lee,  born  October  13,  1881 ;  Carrie  E.,  born 
September  17,  1883;  Lyman  G.,  born  April  25,  1887;  Olive  P.,  born  October  18, 
1891  ;  Edith  E.,  born  December  i,  1893. 

Alice  Parsons  married  Thomas  T.  Parker,  August  4,  1897. 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  57 

Their  children  were:  Lester  L.,  born  May  23,  1900 ;  Lawrence  L,  born 
July  8,  1902. 

Lela  Parsons  married  Del  M.  Kagy,  June  30,  1893. 

Their  children  are:  Lloyd  Parsons,  born  July  3,  1894;  Orville  L.,  born 
June  15,  1896;  Howard  R.,  born  March  14,  1904. 

Eliza  Ann  Mercer  married  Walter  Graham  in  Seattle  in  1857. 

Their  children  were:  William  T.,  born  February  i,  1858;  George  R.,  born 
September  20,  i860. 

Susannah  Mercer  married  David  Graham  in  Seattle,  May  23,  1861.  No 
children. 

Alice  Mercer  married  Clarence  B.  Bagley,  December  24,  1865. 

Their  children  were  Rena,  Myrta,  Ethel  W.,  Alice  Claire  and  Cecil  Clarence. 


GEORGE  CASSELS. 


George  Cassels,  proprietor  of  Hotel  Cassels  at  South  Bend,  has  conducted 
this  hostelry  continuously  and  successfully  since  1909.  He  dates  his  residence 
in  .South  Bend,  however,  from  1890  and  throughout  the  intervening  period  has 
been  actively  and  helpfully  associated  with  business  interests  here.  Many  tangi- 
ble evidences  of  his  public  spirit  may  be  cited  and  at  all  times  his  cooperation  has 
been  counted  upon  as  a  factor  in  the  work  of  general  improvement. 

Mr.  Cassels  was  born  at  London,  Ontario,  Canada,  July  8,  1857,  and  pursued 
his  education  in  the  schools  of  Stratford,  Ontario.  He  first  became  connected 
with  the  bakery  business  at  Portage  la  Prairie,  Manitoba,  in  1882,  and  there 
remained  for  four  years,  after  which  he  removed  to  Brandon,  Manitoba,  and 
in  1890  arrived  in  South  Bend.  There  he  established  a  confectionery  and  bakery 
business  and  gradually  developed  a  large  restaurant,  but  in  1906  he  disposed  of 
his  bakery  and  embarked  in  the  hotel  business  in  a  building  purchased  from  the 
Peters  estate  and  now  occupied  by  the  Willapa  Power  Company.  This  he  con- 
ducted in  connection  with  his  restaurant  for  three  years.  He  then  leased  the 
Stevens  Hotel  building  across  the  street  and  closed  out  his  restaurant,  renting 
the  lower  part  of  the  original  hotel  for  a  furniture  store  and  reserving  the 
upstairs  rooms  for  a  hotel  annex.  For  the  past  seven  years  he  has  conducted  a 
very  successful  business  as  proprietor  of  Hotel  Cassels  and  he  is  the  present 
manager.  He  has  made  this  a  popular  hostelry  by  reason  of  the  excellent  service 
and  prompt  attention  accorded  patrons  and  he  has  made  the  Cassels  Hotel  an 
establishment  which  draws  to  the  city  many  traveling  men. 

On  the  25th  of  October,  1885,  Mr.  Cassels  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Josephine  E.  Fish,  a  native  of  South  Oxford,  Canada,  and  they  have  become  the 
parents  of  three  daughters.  Myrtle  May,  who  has  occupied  an  official  position 
in  the  courthouse  for  eight  years  and  is  now  in  the  treasurer's  office,  has  traveled 
quite  extensively  and  spent  some  time  as  stenographer  in  a  big  hotel  in  1  lono- 
lulu.  Florence  is  a  trained  nurse  who  was  graduated  from  the  Good  Samaritan 
Hospital  of  Portland,  Oregon.     She  is  now  in  the  government  service  and  is  in 


58  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

Honolulu  as  a  nurse    in  the    department  hospital    at   Fort  Shafter.     Ada,  the 
youngest  daughter,  is  at  home. 

For  ten  years  Mr.  Cassels  has  been  a  member  of  the  school  board  of  South 
Bend  and  while  so  serving  he  with  two  others  advocated  the  erection  of  a  high 
school  building.  Their  plans  were  carried  out,  resulting  in  the  erection  of  a 
thoroughly  modern  school  building  at  a  cost  of  one  hundred  and  twenty-five 
thousand  dollars.  For  three  terms  Mr.  Cassels  was  a  member  of  the  city  council, 
during  which  period  he  was  chairman  of  the  committee  on  streets.  He  was 
appointed  by  the  fire  department  to  submit  plans  to  the  city  council  for  a  new 
fire  department  building  and  city  hall  and  was  made  a  committee  of  one  to  carry 
out  the  plans  and  specifications  as  submitted.  By  getting  donations,  a  very  sub- 
stantial building  was  completed  on  city  dock  property.  Mr.  Cassels  belongs  to 
the  Commercial  Club  and  is  interested  in  all  those  forces  which  work  for  the 
development  and  progress  of  the  community.  He  is  secretary  of  the  Pacific 
County  Improvement  Company,  of  which  Judge  H.  W.  B.  Hewen  is  president. 
This  organization  and  the  committee  of  the  Commercial  Club  were  instrumental 
in  securing  the  shipyard  for  South  Bend  and  donated  two  blocks  or  six  acres  of 
the  site.  He  belongs  to  the  Presbyterian  church  and  fraternally  is  connected 
with  the  Odd  Fellows,  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  the  Modern  W^oodmen  of 
America.  His  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican  party.  His  activity 
has  made  him  a  leading  citizen  of  South  Bend,  where  the  intelligent  direction  of 
his  labors  has  wrought  good  results  in  both  the  attainment  of  individual  success 
and  the  advancement  of  public  welfare. 


JOHN  L.  BOYLE. 


John  L.  Boyle,  of  Everett,  filling  the  office  of  county  treasurer  of  Snohomish 
county,  was  born  in  Perth,  Scotland,  November  22,  1861,  a  son  of  David  and 
Margaret  (Evitt)  Boyle,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  the  land  of  hills  and 
heather.  The  father  was  a  cloth  weaver  in  that  country  and  in  the  year  1868 
he  came  to  the  new  world,  settling  first  in  Ontario,  Canada,  where  he  continued 
to  reside  until  1870  and  then  removed  to  Pittsfield,  Massachusetts,  where  he 
continued  in  the  same  line  of  business  until  called  to  his  final  rest,  his  death 
occurring  in  1906,  when  he  had  reached  the  age  of  seventy  years.  His  widow, 
who  was  born  in  Edinburgh,  is  still  living  and  now  resides  in  the  city  of  Sno- 
homish, Washington.  In  their  family  were  three  children :  John  L.,  of  this 
review;  David,  a  resident  of  Everett;  and  Margaret,  the  wife  of  William  Gorie, 
living  in  Ontario,  Canada. 

John  L.  Boyle  was  a  little  lad  of  seven  summers  when  the  family  crossed 
the  Atlantic  and  his  education  was  acquired  in  the  schools  of  Ontario,  Canada, 
to  the  age  of  sixteen  years,  when  his  textbooks  were  put  aside  and  he  became  a 
sailor  on  the  Great  Lakes.  He  followed  a  seafaring  life  for  four  years  and, 
going  upon  the  ocean,  visited  all  parts  of  the  world.  In  fact  he  went  around  the 
world  four  times  before  attaining  the  age  of  twenty  years.  At  length,  however, 
he  determined  to  settle  down  and  it  1882  became  a  resident  of  Snohomish, 
whither  he  made  his  way  an  entire  stranger.     There  he  became  connected  with 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  59 

the  logging  business  and  was  thus  employed  for  a  year,  after  which  he  began 
business  in  the  same  line  on  his  own  account,  devoting  eight  years  thereto.  In 
1 891  he  was  married  and  entered  the  hardware  business,  which  he  conducted  for 
two  years.  Between  1893  and  1907  he  was  variously  employed  and  in  the  latter 
year  was  called  to  public  office,  being  made  city  marshal  of  Snohomish,  in  wh^ch 
capacity  he  served  for  a  year.  For  seven  years  following  he  was  water  super- 
intendent of  Snohomish  and  still  higher  political  honors  came  to  him  in  his 
election  to  the  state  legislature,  of  which  he  w^as  a  member  from  191 1  until 
1913.  At  the  same  time  he  retained  his  position  as  superintendent  of  the  water 
department.  In  1912  he  was  elected  to  the  office  of  county  treasurer  and  en- 
tered upon  the  duties  of  that  position  on  the  ist  of  January,  19 13,  being  still  the 
incumbent  in  the  office,  the  duties  of  which  he  is  discharging  in  a  manner  most 
creditable  to  himself  and  satisfactory  to  his  constituents. 

On  the  9th  of  March,  1891,  in  Snohomish,  Mr.  Boyle  was  united  in  marriage 
to  Miss  Hattie  Proctor,  a  native  of  Iowa  and  a  daughter  of  Alexander  and  Tirza 
(Smith)  Proctor.  The  latter  still  survives  at  the  age  of  eighty-three  years  and 
makes  her  home  with  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Boyle.  The  Proctors  are  an  old  Iowa  family 
and  were  prominently  connected  with  many  leading  families  of  that  state.  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Boyle  are  the  parents  of  four  children,  as  follows :  Helen,  who  was 
born  in  Snohomish,  Washington,  on  the  17th  of  January,  1892;  Phimester  Proc- 
tor, who  was  born  June  17,  1895,  and  is  employed  in  his  father's  office;  Gordon, 
whose  birth  occurred  in  Snohomish,  Washington,  on  the  7th  of  September,  1902, 
and  John  L.,  Jr.,  born  in  January,  1905. 

In  his  political  views  Mr.  Boyle  is  a  progressive  and  has  long  been  active 
in  politics,  recognizing  the  duties  and  obligations  as  well  as  the  privileges  of 
citizenship.  Fraternally  he  is  connected  with  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  with 
the  Maccabees  and  he  fs  also  a  member  of  the  Commercial  Club  of  Everett.  He 
belongs  to  the  First  Congregational  church,  of  which  he  is  a  trustee,  and  his  life 
is  guided  by  its  teachings,  which  find  manifestation  in  honorable  manhood  in  every 
relation.  He  is  recognized  as  a  man  of  sterling  character  and  a  most  efficient 
officer  and  during  his  incumbency  in  his  present  position  he  has  instituted  many 
improvements  resulting  in  considerable  saving  to  the  taxpayers.  He  is  beloved  by 
his  employes  and  is  honored  and  respected  wherever  known,  for  he  possesses 
those  sterling  traits  of  character  which  in  every  land  and  clime  awaken  confidence 
and  regard. 


THOMAS   GEISNESS. 


Thomas  Geisness,  county  superintendent  of  schools  of  Clallam  county  and  a 
representative  of  the  bar  at  Port  Angeles,  where  he  makes  his  home,  was  born  in 
St.  Croix  county,  Wisconsin,  October  25,  1874,  a  son  of  Alexander  and  Anna 
(Lund)  Geisness,  who  were  natives  of  Norway  and  in  childhood  came  to  the 
new  world,  settling  in  Wisconsin,  where  they  were  married.  The  father  there  en- 
gaged in  farming  to  the  tijne  of  his  death,  which  occurred  in  1878,  when  he  was 
forty-seven  years  of  age.  His  wife  long  survived  and  passed  away  in  1913  at  the 
age  of  seventy-eight  years. 


60  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

Thomas  Geisness  was  the  fifth  in  order  of  birth  in  a  family  of  six  children 
and  in  his  boyhood  days  he  pursued  the  branches  of  study  taught  in  the  public 
schools  of  his  native  state,  entering  the  University  of  Minnesota  after  completing 
a  course  in  the  high  school  of  Hudson,  Wisconsin.  He  took  academic  and  post 
graduate  work  in  the  university  and  prepared  for  the  bar,  after  which  he  came 
to  Washington  in  1907  and  passed  the  required  examination.  He  then  located 
for  practice  in  Port  Angeles,  where  he  has  since  remained,  enjoying  a  liberal 
clientage  that  has  connected  him  with  much  important  litigation.  For  six  years 
he  was  interested  in  school  work  as  city  superintendent  in  Port  Angeles.  This 
was  not,  however,  his  initial  experience  in  the  educational  field,  for  prior  to  his 
removal  to  Washington  he  had  been  city  superintendent  of  schools  at  Blue  Earth 
and  at  Lakefield,  Minnesota.  After  five  years  devoted  to  teaching  in  Port 
Angeles  he  was  elected  county  superintendent  of  schools  of  Clallam  county  in  1912 
and  is  now  acceptably  filling  that  position  for  the  second  term.  He  closely  studies 
every  question  in  any  way  bearing  upon  the  educational  situation  and  has  intro- 
duced reforms  and  improvements  of  practical  benefit  and  value  to  the  community. 
He  has  ever  been  a  man  of  studious  habits  and  post  graduate  work  covering 
three  years  brought  him  the  degrees  of  Master  of  Arts  and  Ph.  D.,  the  former 
being  conferred  in  1899,  and  the  latter  in  1901. 

In  August,  1902,  Mr.  Geisness  was  married  to  Miss  Mae  Martin,  of  Indian- 
apolis, a  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  John  Martin  and  a  native  of  Indiana.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Geisness  have  become  the  parents  of  four  children :  Evelyn,  who  was  born 
in  Blue  Earth,  Minnesota,  in  1904;  John,  born  in  Farmington,  Minnesota,  in 
1907;  Katherine,  in  Port  Angeles  in  1910;  and  Robert,  in  1913. 

Mr.  Geisness  is  a  member  of  both  the  county  and  state  Bar  Associations  and 
enjoys  the  confidence  and  high  regard  of  his  professional  colleagues  and  con- 
temporaries as  well  as  his  associates  and  coworkers  in  the  educational  field.  In 
Masonry  he  has  taken  the  Royal  Arch  degree  and  he  is  also  connected  with  the 
Loyal  Order  of  Moose  and  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  America.  He  is  interested 
in  all  those  questions  and  projects  which  have  to  do  with  the  uplift  of  the  in- 
dividual and  the  progress  of  the  race  and  he  is  regarded  as  a  valuable  addition  to 
the  citizenship  of  Port  Angeles. 


GEORGE  H.  EMERSON. 

In  the  period  of  pioneer  development  George  H.  Emerson  arrived  in  Hoquiam, 
and  taking  up  his  abode  at  the  Campbell  Hotel,  spent  a  few  weeks  in  thoroughly 
exploring  the  surrounding  territory  in  order  to  become  familiar  with  its  natural 
resources  and  the  advantages  here  ofit'ered.  He  made  his  way  to  Hoquiam  from 
Gardiner,  Oregon,  but  New  England  claimed  him  as  a  native  son,  his  birth 
having  occurred  in  Chester,  New  Hampshire,  January  18,  1846.  His  father, 
Nathaniel  F.  Emerson,  was  born  in  Chester,  New  Hampshire,  in  1804  and  in 
1831  wedded  Clarissa  Goodhue,  by  whom  he  had  four  children:  John,  Elizabeth, 
Stephen  and  George  H. 

George  H.  Emerson  removed  with  his  parents  to  Massachusetts  and  when  the 
Civil  war  broke  out  enlisted  for  active  service  in  defense  of  the  Union.  Following 


GEORGE  H.  EMERSON 


THE   NEW   YOP.K 
PUBLIC  LIBRARY 


ASTOR,  .LENOX 
TILDEN   FOUNDATION 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  63 

his  return  home  with  a  most  creditable  military  record  he  attended  Harvard 
College  and  in  1866  he  made  his  way  to  Kansas  City,  whence  with  ox  teams  he 
traveled  across  the  plains  to  San  Francisco.  Entering  the  employ  of  Asa  M. 
Simpson,  he  was  sent  to  work  in  a  lumber  mill  on  Coos  Bay  in  Oregon.  Life  on 
the  western  coast  made  strong  appeal  to  him  and  he  determined  to  permanently 
identify  his  interests  with  those  of  the  northwest. 

Accordingly  in  1868  he  returned  to  the  east,  where  he  wedded  Miss  Lizzie 
Damon  and  then  took  his  bride  to  the  San  Joaquin  valley  in  California,  where  he 
began  farming,  but  was  obliged  to  leave  there  because  of  drought.  He  then  re- 
entered the  employ  of  Captain  Simpson  and  in  1881  was  sent  to  investigate  the 
resources  of  the  Grays  Harbor  country.  Before  returning  to  San  Francisco  he 
purchased  three  hundred  acres  of  land,  including  the  present  mill  site  of  the 
Northwestern  Lurnber  Company  and  a  large  part  of  the  first  plat  of  the  town  of 
Hoquiam.  He  then  went  south  with  Captain  Simpson  and  purchased  a  sawmill 
which  was  in  operation  at  Albion,  California.  The  machinery  was  loaded  on  the 
brig  Orient  and  arrived  in  Hoquiam  in  April,  1882,  in  charge  of  Mr.  Emerson. 
A  pile  driver  for  putting  in  the  foundation  was  purchased  at  Willapa  Harbor, 
Shoalwater  Bay,  but  while  being  brought  around  by  ocean  was  overturned  and 
lost.  Progress  on  the  new  mill  was  rapid  and  in  August,  1882,  the  first  whistle 
indicated  that  an  advanced  step  was  taken  toward  changing  pioneer  conditions 
into  those  of  the  present  day.  The  mill  was  opened  with  a  capacity  of  fifty 
thousand  feet  daily  and  now  has  a  capacity  of  one  hundred  and  fifty  thousand 
feet.  On  the  15th  of  June,  1896,  the  entire  milling  plant  was  destroyed  by  fire 
but  was  immediately  rebuilt,  up-to-date  machinery  and  equipment  being  installed. 
In  1884  Mr.  Emerson  brought  to  the  county  the  first  logging  engine,  which  he 
operated  in  the  Whishkah  camp  with  , a  six.  inch  Manila  rope  cable.  His  activities 
proved  a  most  potent  element  in  the  pioneer  development  of  the  lumber  interests 
in  the  city. 

Furthermore,  Mr.  Emerson  was  connected  with  every  movement  for  the 
development  of  city  and  county.  For  many  years  he  was  a  prominent  leader  of 
the  republican  party  in  the  Grays  Harbor  district  but  never  held  nor  would  he 
accept  public  office,  and  he  declined  the  request  of  party  leaders  to  become  a 
candidate  for  governor  at  the  time  Mead  was  nominated,  notwithstanding  the 
fact  that  a  nomination  at  that  time  meant  an  election. 

Fie  constantly  broadened  his  business  interests  and  all  of  his  undertakings 
were  of  a  character  that  contributed  to  the  progress  and  prosperity  of  the 
comnumity  as  well  as  to  individual  success.  He  was  president  of  the  Harbor 
Land  Company,  president  of  the  Frank  H.  Lamb  Timber  Company,  president  of 
the  Grays  Harbor  Tugboat  Company,  vice  president  of  the  Grays  Harbor  Com- 
pany, vice  president  of  the  Northwestern  Lumber  Company  and  vice  president 
of  the  First  National  Bank.  He  was  also  interested  in  the  Lumbermen's  Indemnity 
Insurance  Company,  was  a  stockholder  in  the  Metropolitan  Bank  and  a  director 
of  the  Metropolitan  Building  Company  of  Seattle.  He  was  also  proprietor  of 
the  Hoquiam  Theatre,  president  and  principal  owner  of  the  North  Shore  Electric 
Company  and  president  of  the  Whishkah  Boom  Company.  Gradually  he  ad- 
vanced, working  his  way  upward  step  by  step  and  constantly  increasing  the  extent 
and  importance  of  his  interests  until  he  became  one  of  the  foremost  business 

men  of  this  section  of  the  state.     He  proved  his  grasp  of  financial  affairs  by 
Vol.  n— 4 


64  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

organizing  several  land,  real  estate  and  commercial  concerns  apart  from  the 
lumber  industry  and  until  the  last  four  or  five  years  of  his  life  retained  his  con- 
nection with  active  business  interests.  After  retiring  he  made  several  trips 
abroad,  but  Hoquiam  v^as  always  his  home  and  the  summer  seasons  were  spent 
at  Pacific  Beach,  where  he  had  a  beautiful  residence.  He  was  a  famous  swimmer 
and  was  exceedingly  fond  of  outdoor  life. 

To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Emerson  were  born  four  children,  two  of  whom  are  deceased. 
A  sketch  of  Ralph  D.  appears  below\  Alice  is  the  wife  of  Frank  H.  Lamb,  of 
Hoquiam.  George  D.,  who  is  deceased,  was  married  but  left  no  children. 
Florence  E.  became  the  wife  of  Charles  Miller,  of  Aberdeen,  and  is  deceased. 
She  was  the  mother  of  a  son,  Charles  Emerson. 

Mr.  Emerson  found  his  greatest  happiness  in  providing  for  the  welfare  and 
comfort  of  his  family.  He  belonged  to  the  Rainier  Club  and  was  a  charter 
member  of  the  Elks  lodge  of  Hoquiam.  Death  called  him  August  2,  1914,  and 
all  who  knew  him  and  were  acquainted  with  his  splendid  career  feel  that  his 
place  will  never  be  filled.  He  was  continually  reaching  out  along  lines  that  have 
proved  of  great  public  benefit.  No  one  ever  questioned  his  integrity  in  personal 
matters,  in  business  or  in  his  relations  to  city,  county  and  state.  Much  of  his 
time  was  given  to  promote  the  progress  and  upbuilding  of  Hoquiam  and  he  was 
actuated  by  a  notably  strong  sense  of  justice  and  endeavored  to  secure  fair  and 
impartial  conditions.  He  was  particularly  interested  that  the  tax  should  be  justly 
levied  and  that  all  should  pay  their  due  proportion  and  no  more.  When  he 
passed  away  the  deepest  regret  was  felt  on  every  hand,  for  he  had  endeared 
himself  to  all  with  whom  he  had  come  in  contact,  while  his  life  work  had  made  his 
history  an  integral  part  in  the  annals  of  his  adopted  city. 


RALPH  D.  EMERSON. 

Ralph  D.  Emerson  needs  no  introduction  to  the  readers  of  this  volume  who 
are  residents  of  the  Grays  Harbor  country,  for  practically  his  entire  life  has  been 
here  passed.  He  was  born  in  1880,  a  son  of  George  H.  Emerson,  one  of 
Hoquiam's  most  distinguished  and  honored  citizens,  and  he  has  followed  in  the 
footsteps  of  his  father,  not  only  becoming  a  most  progressive,  alert  and  enter- 
prising business  man  but  also  one  whose  interest  in  public  afifairs  is  actuated  by 
an  earnest  desire  to  promote  the  public  welfare. 

In  1910  Ralph  D.  Emerson  was  married  to  Miss  Frances  Soule,  of  Hoquiam, 
also  a  representative  of  a  pioneer  family,  and  they  have  two  children,  Elizabeth 
and  George  H. 

In  the  acquirement  of  his  education  Ralph  D.  Emerson  attended  the  Leland 
Stanford  University  of  California,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  1903  after 
having  made  a  special  study  of  chemistry.  Soon  after  returning  from  college  he 
started  the  Aloha  Lumber  Company  at  Aloha,  Washington,  of  which  he  is 
now  president.  He  became  the  active  assistant  of  his  father  in  business  and 
upon  the  father's  death  succeeded  him  in  the  management  and  control  of  the 
important  interests  which  he  left.  He  is  now  at  the  head  of  all  the  concerns 
of    which    his    father    was    chief    officer    and    is    bending    his    energies    toward 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  65 

administrative  direction  and  executive  control,  finding  ready  solution  for  intricate 
business  problems  and  readily  discriminating-  between  the  essential  and  the 
nonessential  in  the  management  of  all  his  affairs.  He  is  now  building  for  the 
George  H.  Emerson  estate  a  fifty  thousand  dollar  office  building  in  Hoquiam. 

In  his  political  views  Mr.  Emerson  is  an  earnest  republican  and  keeps  well 
informed  on  the  questions  and  issues  of  the  day.  Fraternally  he  is  connected 
with  the  Elks  and  along  more  strictly  social  lines  is  identified  with  the  Country 
Club.  He  is  a  man  of  broad  mind  and  generous  spirit  and  is  in  hearty  sympathy 
with  all  those  progressive  forces  which  are  accomplishing  much  in  the  develop- 
ment and  upbuilding  of  city  and  state. 


NELSON  BENNETT. 


The  world  instinctively  pays  deference  to  the  man  whose  honors  have  been 
worthily  won  as  the  result  of  his  wise  utilization  of  the  opportunities  which 
have  come  to  him  and  of  the  talents  with  which  nature  has  endowed  him.  It 
was  the  consensus  of  opinion  on  the  part  of  his  fellowmen  that  Nelson  Bennett 
was  one  of  the  most  conspicuous  and  honored  figures  in  the  northwest.  To  him 
life  was  purposeful.  He  regarded  home,  citizenship  and  business  opportunity 
as  something  to  be  carefully  cultivated  and  cherished.  He  felt  that  in  all  of 
these  connections  there  was  a  work  to  be  done  and  he  never  neglected  the  duty 
that  came  to  him.  He  was  identified  with  some  of  the  greatest  railroad  engineer- 
ing projects  which  have  led  to  the  development  of  the  northwest,  and  when  his 
business  connections  brought  him  to  Tacoma,  he  was  so  pleased  with  the  city 
and  its  opportunities,  its  geographical  situation  and  its  beauty  that  he  decided 
to  remain. 

Mr.  Bennett  was  born  in  Sutton,  Canada,  October  14,  1843,  and  his  life 
spanned  the  intervening  years  to  the  20th  of  July,  1913.  His  parents  were 
Nicholas  and  Diana  (Sprague)  Bennett  but  in  early  youth  he  left  his  mother's 
home.  His  father  had  died  when  the  son  was  but  seven  years  of  age,  leaving 
the  widowed  mother  with  six  children  to  support,  and  at  the  age  of  fourteen 
Nelson  Bennett  was  doing  a  man's  work  on  a  farm.  He  attended  the  country 
schools  for  six  months  in  a  year,  receiving  such  primitive  instruction  as  the 
district  schools  of  that  time  afforded.  When  seventeen  years  of  age  he  went  to 
Orleans  county.  New  York,  and  at  the  age  of  twenty  years  was  employed  by 
the  United  States  government  on  the  construction  of  government  barracks. 
Later  he  made  his  way  to  the  oil  regions  of  Pennsylvania,  and  although  the 
youngest  contractor  in  the  field,  did  a  profitable  business,  receiving  a  liberal 
patronage.  He  sank  twenty-five  successful  wells  in  that  region.  In  1867  he 
went  to  Missouri  and  became  identified  with  the  west  as  school  teacher,  Indian 
fighter  and  miner.  Before  the  advent  of  railroads  into  the  Rocky  Mountain 
regions  he  was  engaged  in  extensive  transportation  operations  through  the  west 
in  company  with  Senator  William  A.  Clark  of  Montana.  It  was  in  1875  that 
he  established  mule  freight  trains  in  that  state  and  it  was  while  thus  engaged 
that  he  met  Washington  Dunn,  representative  of  Jay  Gould,  whose  acquaintance 
he  formed,  resulting  in  Mr.  Bennett's  ultimately  becoming  interested  in  railroad 


66  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

building.  During  his  freighting  days  he  took  into  Butte,  Montana,  the  first 
mining  machinery  conveyed  into  that  camp  and  he  built  the  first  street  railway 
system  in  Butte. 

It  was  perhaps  Mr.  Bennett's  operations  as  a  railroad  builder  and  the  pro- 
moter of  engineering  projects  of  great  magnitude  and  importance  that  made 
him  most  widely  known.  He  was  considered  one  of  the  most  sagacious  of  all 
the  western  railroad  builders  and  within  ten  years  had  risen  from  an  obscure 
position  as  a  comparatively  penniless  young  man  to  a  place  among  the  million- 
aires of  the  northwest.  He  began  by  taking  sub-contracts  for  railroad  building 
under  Washington  Dunn  and  following  the  sudden  death  of  Mr.  Dunn  took  up 
and  completed  the  work  and  became  his  successor  as  a  railroad  builder. 

Mr.  Bennett  commenced  the  construction  of  the  big  tunnel  through  the 
summit  of  the  Bitter  Root  mountains  between  Montana  and  Idaho  for  the 
Chicago,  Milwaukee  &  St.  Paul  Railroad,  but  as  weather  conditions  were  un- 
favorable, he  was  unable  to  get  his  machinery  and  supplies  located  as  soon  as 
he  desired,  and,  realizing  that  it  would  be  impossible  to  complete  the  task  within 
the  specified  time  of  two  years  and  that  he  would  thus  be  compelled  to  pay  a 
large  forfeit,  he  sold  his  contract  to  the  railroad,  which  completed  the  tunnel 
according  to  his  plans.  While  engaged  in  that  work  he  had  direct  supervision 
and  lived  with  his  men  in  the  camps  not  only  when  the  work  was  being  carried 
on  through  the  summer  but  also  through  the  winter  when  deep  snows  cut  them 
off  from  all  the  outside  world  and  stopped  his  work. 

Mr.  Bennett  was  also  the  builder  of  the  big  irrigation  ditch  thirty-five  miles 
in  length,  furnishing  water  to  two  hundred  and  seventy  thousand  acres  of  land. 
This  was  constructed  for  the  Twin  Falls  Land  &  Water  Company  on  the  Snake, 
river  in  Idaho  and  the  work  required  about  six  hundred  men  and  twelve  hun- 
dred horses,  together  with  steam  railroads,  steam  shovels,  graders,  pumps  and 
drills,  as  much  of  the  work  had  to  be  done  in  the  solid  rock.  This  is  said  to  be 
the  finest  piece  of  engineering  of  its  kind  in  the  United  States.  Mr.  Bennett 
had  a  remarkable  sense  of  direction  and  could  with  a  compass  and  the  stars  for 
his  guide  reach  any  given  point  for  which  he  set  out.  He  built  much  of  the 
Northern  Pacific  Railroad  through  Montana  and  when  his  work  there  was  com- 
pleted he  was  awarded  the  contract  for  boring  the  tunnel  under  the  Stampede 
Pass  for  the  Northern  Pacific  Railway — a  gigantic  undertaking  for  that  day,  as 
was  evidenced  by  the  army  of  men  and  horses  and  the  amount  of  machinery 
which  he  had  to  assemble  for  the  purpose.  The  gigantic  task  was  completed 
in  two  years,  long  before  the  specified  time  and  he  received  one  hundred  thou- 
sand dollars  for  so  doing.  At  the  end  of  that  time  Mr.  Bennett  removed  with 
his  family  to  Tacoma,  bringing  with  him  a  fortune  of  a  million  dollars  which 
he  had  accumulated.  From  that  time  forward  he  was  closely  associated  with 
the  interests,  development  and  progress  of  the  city  and  promoted  a  number  of 
those  utilities  which  have  featured  largely  in  the  city's  upbuilding.  He  was 
associated  with  Allen  Mason  in  the  establishment  of  the  street  railway  system 
of  Tacoma,  beginning  on  Pacific  avenue,  just  north  of  the  Northern  Pacific 
Railroad,  and  crossing  at  Seventeenth  street,  extending  from  Seventeenth  to 
Seventh  street.  This  was  a  horse  car  line.  Mr.  Bennett  afterward  built  another 
line  on  C  street  from  Ninth  to  Tacoma  avenue  and  extending  out  Tacoma  avenue 
and  on  North  G  street  to  the  top  of  the  hill  above  the  old  town.     He  enlarged 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  67 

the  system  to  meet  the  demands  occasioned  by  Tacoma's  rapid  growth  until  he 
sold  out  to  the  syndicate  headed  by  Henry  Villard,  who  continued  the  work  that 
Mr.  Bennett  had  begun  and  carried  out  his  ideas,  developing  the  present  street 
railway  system  under  the  name  of  the  Tacoma  Railway  &  Power  Company. 

When  Mr.  Bennett  had  closed  out  his  street  railway  interests  he  founded 
the  town  of  Fairhaven,  now  a  part  of  Bellingham,  and  there  established  mills 
and  factories,  also  built  a  fine  hotel,  founded  a  daily  newspaper  and  put  on  the 
steamers  Fairhaven  and  State  of  Washington,  built  especially  for  trade  between 
Fairhaven  and  Tacoma.  He  also  began  building  railroads  out  of  Fairhaven  to 
the  east  and  south — lines  which  have  since  become  a  part  of  a  great  railway 
system.  In  1891  he  purchased  the  Tacoma  Hotel  from  C.  B.  Wright  of  Phila- 
delphia, who  was  one  of  the  founders  of  the  city  and  a  former  president  of  the 
Northern  Pacific  Railway  Company.  He  likewise  purchased  the  Tacoma 
Ledger,  the  leading  newspaper  of  the  city,  for  which  he  paid  one  hundred  and 
twenty  thousand  dollars  cash. 

In  the  panic  following  Baring  Brothers'  failure  Mr.  Bennett's  fortune  was 
swept  away,  after  which  he  again  turned  his  attention  to  construction  work, 
building  the  Palmer  cut-off  for  the  Northern  Pacific  Railroad  and  the  Pacific 
ocean  extension  to  the  beach  at  Moclips.  When  he  started  the  Cascade  tunne! 
in  1886  he  had  to  haul  his  machinery  a  distance  of  ninety  miles  before  he  could 
begin  operations  on  the  tunnel,  which  is  nine  thousand  eight  hundred  and  fifty 
feet  long,  sixteen  feet  wide  and  twenty-two  feet  high  and  which  was  put  through 
in  shorter  time  than  any  other  of  similar  character  in  this  country.  He  built  the 
Cascade  division  of  the  Northern  Pacific  from  Pasco  to  Puget  Sound,  built  a 
large  part  of  the  line  of  the  Oregon  Railway  &  Navigation  Company  and  also 
executed  important  railroad  building  projects  in  Utah.  When  the  Northern 
Pacific  planned  the  construction  of  the  Point  Defiance  line  Mr.  Bennett,  al- 
though he  had  retired,  felt  the  call  again  and  took  the  work,  while  younger  men 
sat  back  and  looked  on  in  amazement.  That  he  was  capable  for  the  task  was 
evidenced  in  the  dispatch  with  which  he  undertook  the  completion  of  the  Poin: 
Defiance  tunnel,  a  work  second  in  importance  to  none  save  his  earlier  achieve- 
ment in  the  Cascade  mountains.  These  two  tunnels  are  a  monument  to  the 
business  ability  and  enterprise  of  Mr.  Bennett,  who  had  almost  completed  this 
last  tunnel  when  death  called  him,  but  it  was  finished  by  his  widow  and  the 
Northern  Pacific  Railway  Company  fittingly  named  it  in  his  honor  the  Nelson 
Bennett  tunnel.  Mr.  Bennett  was  also  a  director  of  the  Merchants  National 
Bank  and  when  the  panic  came  he  turned  over  eighty  thousand  dollars  of  his 
own  private  fortune  to  save  the  bank,  but  it  was  swept  away  with  other  securi- 
ties. Another  notable  work  which  he  accomplished  was  the  spanning  of  the 
Chilkoot  Pass  in  Alaska  with  a  tramway  that  was  constructed  in  the  winter. 

At  Dillon.  Montana,  Mr.  Bennett  was  married  to  Mrs.  Lottie  H.  Wells,  of 
New  York,  and  they  became  the  parents  of  five  cliildren.  of  whom  four  are 
living:  Mrs.  Stephen  Appleby;  Mrs.  Ceta  Munsey ;  Nelsie,  who  married  Minot 
Davis ;  and  Charlotte  C. 

Mr.  Bennett  was  a  prominent  Mason  and  attained  the  thirty-second  degree 
in  the  Scottish  Rite.  In  politics  he  was  a  republican  and  served  as  one  of  the 
first  delegates  to  the  national  convention  of  his  party  after  Washington  became 
a  state  and  was  a  leading  candidate  for  the  United  States  senate.     At  one  time 


68  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

he  was  president  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  of  Tacoma,  and  he  spent  a  con- 
siderable period  as  the  president  of  the  park  board,  doing  much  to  better  the 
condition  of  the  animals  and  birds  in  the  zoo,  for  he  was  a  great  lover  of  these. 
He  was  a  most  earnest  advocate  of  a  well  developed  park  and  boulevard  system 
and  he  favored  every  well  defined  plan  and  project  for  the  upbuilding,  improve- 
ment and  adornment  of  his  adopted  city.  He  was  not  only  a  great  railroad 
builder  but  was  also  the  builder  and  architect  of  his  own  fortunes  and  more  than 
that,  of  a  reputation  and  of  a  character  which  in  every  relation  and  under  trying 
circumstances  remained  unsullied.  His  work  was  great  but  not  greater  than  the 
man  who  promoted  it.  The  value  and  importance  of  his  life  cannot  be  measured 
by  tangible  standards  but  all  recognize  the  fact  that  it  constituted  one  of  the 
most  potent  forces  in  the  development,  upbuilding  and  promotion  of  the  north- 
west. 


WINSLOW  M.  McCURDY. 

Winslow  M.  McCurdy,  actively  identified  with  newspaper  publication  at  Port 
Tcwnsend  as  owner  and  editor  of  the  Leader,  was  born  October  lo,  1877,  in  the 
city  in  which  he  still  makes  his  home,  his  parents  being  William  A.  and  Hannah 
(Ebinger)  McCurdy,  the  father  a  native  of  Maine  and  the  mother  of  Wisconsin. 
The  latter  passed  away  in  Portland,  Oregon,  in  1880,  when  but  thirty-five  years 
of  age.  The  father  became  a  well  known  ship  joiner  and  in  1857  removed  to 
Port  Townsend,  where  his  remaining  days  were  passed,  his  death  occurring  in 
1890,  when  he  was  about  fifty-eight  years  of  age. 

In  their  family  were  four  children,  of  whom  Winslow  M.  was  the  youngest. 
In  his  boyhood  he  attended  the  public  schools  of  Port  Townsend  to  the  age  of 
twelve  years,  when  he  began  learning  the  printer's  trade,  entering  the  employ  of 
the  Leader  Company,  with  which  he  remained  for  about  five  years.  For  ten 
years  he  worked  on  various  newspapers  and  in  print  shops  and  for  some  years 
was  engaged  in  mining.  Returning  to  Port  Towsend  in  1905,  he  purchased  an  in- 
terest in  the  Leader  Publishing  Company  and  later  in  the  Call  Publishing  Company 
and  since  that  time  has  conducted  business  on  his  own  account,  publishing  the 
Fort  Townsend  Leader,  which  is  a  four-page,  six-column  paper — a  folio  sheet 
which  has  a  large  circulation  through  Jefferson  county.  He  issues  both  a  daily 
and  weekly  edition  and  the  paper  finds  a  ready  sale.  The  large  circulation  list 
renders  the  paper  also  an  excellent  advertising  medium. 

At  Port  Townsend,  on  the  9th  of  July.  1908,  Mr.  McCurdy  was  united  in 
marriage  to  Miss  Johanna  Iffland,  a  daughter  of  John  and  Lisette  Ift'land.  The 
father  died  November  30,  1914,  but  the  mother  is  still  living.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
McCurdy  have  become  parents  of  three  children :  Winslow  I.,  who  was  born 
at  Port  Townsend,  July  2,  1909;  Richard  F.,  whose  birth  occurred  at  Port  Town- 
send  on  the  31st  of  December,  1910;  and  Jean  Lisette.  born  at  Port  Townsend. 
April  22,  1914. 

Fraternally  Mr.  McCurdy  is  an  Elk  and  a  Woodman  of  the  World.  His 
political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican  party  and  he  is  a  stalwart  champion 
of  its  principles  because  of  his  firm  belief  in  the  party  platform.     His  career  is 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 


69 


that  of  a  self-made  man,  for  from  the  early  age  of  twelve  years  he  has  worked 
his  way  upward  unaided  and  he  stands  high  as  one  of  the  leading  and  popular 
newspaper  publishers  of  the  state. 


HUGH  ELDRIDGE. 


Hugh  Eldridge,  who  has  recently  retired  from  the  position  of  postmaster  of 
Bellingham  after  many  years'  service  in  that  office,  has  been  identified  with  the 
city  and  its  interests  for  a  longer  period  than  almost  any  other  of  its  residents.  In 
fact,  he  was  born  in  Bellingham,  December  14,  i860,  a  son  of  Edward  and  Teresa 
(Lappin)  Eldridge,  who  were  among  the  first  white  settlers  on  the  bay  and  of 
whom  extended  mention  is  made  elsewhere  in  this  work.  He  attended  the  public 
schools  until  he  reached  the  age  of  eighteen  years,  after  which  he  concentrated 
his  energies  upon  the  cultivation  of  his  father's  farm  until  1886,  when,  at  the  age 
of  twenty-six  years,  he  was  elected  county  auditor.  So  excellent  a  record  did  he 
make  in  office  that  he  was  reelected  in  1888  and  served  until  January,  1891.  He 
then  joined  Edward  Cosgrove,  J.  E.  Baker,  Morris  McCarty  and  C.  J.  Cook  in 
organizing  and  promoting  what  was  then  the  Fairhaven  &  New  Whatcom  Street 
Railway  Company,  building  a  line  between  Bellingham  and  Fairhaven,  also  another 
line  to  Lake  Whatcom  and  a  portion  of  the  line  on  Eldridge  avenue,  in  the  city 
of  Bellingham.  Of  that  company  he  was  president  until  1895,  when  he  resigned 
and  concentrated  his  energies  upon  the  real  estate  business,  controlling  property 
which  had  been  secured  by  his  father  as  a  donation  claim  in  1853  ^^d  which,  sub- 
divided into  city  lots,  has  proven  a  source  of  substantial  revenue.  On  the  ist  of 
July,  1898,  Mr.  Eldridge  was  appointed  postmaster  by  President  McKinley  and 
served  throughout  all  the  intervening  years  until  19 16.  when,  after  eighteen  years' 
connection  with  the  office,  he  retired  under  the  Wilson  administration. 

On  the  23d  of  February,  1893,  in  Bellingham,  Mr.  Eldridge  was  married  to 
Miss  Dellisca  J.  Bowers,  who  passed  away  in  March,  1910.  He  has  membership 
in  the  Elks  lodge,  also  in  the  Cougar  Club,  and  his  political  indorsement  is  given 
to  the  republican  party,  the  principles  of  which  he  stanchly  advocates,  doing  all  in 
his  power  to  promote  the  growth  and  insure  the  success  of  the  party.  For  fifty- 
six  years  he  has  been  a  resident  of  Bellingham,  witnessing  its  development  and 
<"aking  an  active  part  in  all  that  has  pertained  to  its  progress  and  improvement. 
His  substantial  traits  and  kindly  qualities  have  gained  for  him  the  warm  and 
enduring  regard  of  all  with  whom  he  has  been  associated  from  his  boyhood  to 
the  present. 


WILLIAM  J.  PATTERSON. 

In  an  analyzation  of  the  life  record  of  William  J.  Patterson  the  power  of 
organization  stands  out  as  one  of  his  most  clearly  defined  characteristics.  It  is 
this  ability  to  coordinate  and  develop  forces  that  has  made  him  one  of  the  lead- 
ing and  prominent  residents  of  Aberdeen,  where  he  has  made  his  home  since 


70  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

1890,  coming  to  the  northwest  from  Canada.  He  was  born  near  Montreal,  Can- 
ada, in  1872  and  was  therefore  a  young  man  of  but  eighteen  years  when  he 
arrived  in  the  city  in  which  he  still  resides,  entering  its  business  circles  as  clerk 
in  the  bank  of  Hayes  &  Hayes.  That  firm  erected  a  building  at  the  corner  of 
H  and  Heron  streets  and  was  engaged  in  the  banking  business  there  for  many 
years  or  until  the  death  of  H.  A.  Hayes  in  1903.  The  bank  was  capitalized  for 
twenty-five  thousand  dollars  and  became  one  of  the  strong  and  thoroughly  relia- 
ble financial  institutions  of  that  part  of  the  state.  Mr.  Patterson  worked  his  way 
up  to  the  position  of  cashier,  in  which  capacity  he  continued  for  a  number  of 
years,  and  following  the  death  of  Mr.  Hayes  he  served  both  as  cashier  and  man- 
ager, while  Mrs.  Patterson  became  president  of  the  company.  Something  of  the 
continuous,  steady  and  healthful  growth  of  the  business  is  indicated  in  the  fact 
that  the  capital  stock  was  first  increased  to  fifty  thousand  dollars  and  now  stands 
at  three  hundred  thousand  dollars.  Imporant  and  extensive  as  have  been  his 
activities  in  that  connection,  Mr.  Patterson  has  not  confined  his  attention  alone 
to  the  management  and  control  of  the  bank  but  has  also  figured  prominently  in 
other  ways,  being  now  president  of  the  United  States  Trust  Company  of  Aber- 
deen, president  of  the  State  Bank  of  Centralia,  president  of  the  Electric  Light 
Company  and  president  of  the  G.  H.  Street  Railway  Company.  He  readily  rec- 
ognizes opportunities  and  utilizes  them  to  the  fullest  extent  and  whatever  he 
undertakes  he  carries  forward  to  successful  completion. 

Mr.  Patterson  was  the  founder  and  promoter  of  the  Aberdeen  Country  and 
Golf  Club  and  has  been  the  moving  spirit  in  promoting  its  interests.  He  stands 
for  advancement  along  all  lines  that  have  to  do  with  the  material,  intellectual, 
social  and  moral  progress  of  his  community.  He  is  alert  and  watchful  of  oppor- 
tunities to  advance  the  city's  interests  along  any  of  these  lines  and  his  labors 
have  been  far-reaching,  resultant  and  beneficial. 


ROBERT  F.  LYTLE. 


When  flags  were  unfurled  at  half-mast  on  the  20th  of  May,  1916,  it  was  known 
that  Robert  F.  Lytle  had  passed  from  life's  activities,  with  which  he  had  been  so 
closely  and  prominently  associated  as  a  leading  business  man  of  Hoquiam  for  many 
years.  From  the  period  of  the  city's  early  development  he  took  a  most  active  part 
in  promoting  its  lumber  interests  and  such  was  his  ability  that  he  rose  to  distinctive 
prominence,  becoming  one  of  the  foremost  lumbermen  on  the  Pacific  coast.  His 
discrimination  was  keen,  his  judgment  sound  and  he  readily  recognized  and  utilized 
opportunities  that  others  passed  heedlessly  by. 

He  was  born  in  Ogdensburg,  New  York,  September  14,  1854,  and  is  a  son  of 
Joseph  and  Elizabeth  (Foster)  Lytle.  The  Lytle  family  is  of  Irish- American 
parentage,  the  ancestry  in  America  being  traced  back  to  the  Revolutionary  war 
period.  During  the  early  boyhood  of  Robert  F.  Lytle  the  family  removed  from 
New  York  to  Wisconsin,  where  his  father  engaged  in  farming.  The  son's  educa- 
tion was  acquired  in  the  public  schools  of  Portage  and  later  he  completed  a  com- 
mercial course  in  the  University  of  Wisconsin.  On  leaving  that  state  he  removed 
to  Minnesota  and  thence  went  to  Lincoln,  Nebraska,  where  he  engaged  in  business 


EGBERT  F.  LYTLE 


i 


THE  NEW  YORK 
PUBLIC  LIBRARY 

ASTOR,    LENOX 
TILDEN  FOUNDATION 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  73 

for  himself.  There  he  was  married  on  June  2y,  1886,  to  Ida  McDonald,  who  with 
one  daughter,  Doris  Elizabeth,  now  survives  him.  From  Nebraska  Mr.  Lytle  came 
to  Washington  in  1889  and  settled  in  Fairhaven,  where  he  formed  a  partnership 
with  his  brother,  Joseph  Lytle,  in  the  grocery  business.  The  following  year,  rec- 
ognizing the  possibilities  of  Hoquiam,  the  brothers  moved  to  that  place  and  again 
entered  the  grocery  business,  establishing  a  pioneer  grocery  house  which  became 
one  of  the  profitable  commercial  enterprises  of  the  city.  After  a  few  years  they 
were,  much  against  their  will,  to  accept  in  payment  of  a  debt  a  small  logging  outfit 
which  had  been  operated  on  the  East  Hoquiam  river,  just  above  the  present  site  of 
the  various  Lytle  mill  industries.  Oxen  formed  part  of  the  outfit  and  these  were 
used  for  a  short  time  but  were  soon  replaced  by  engines.  It  was  this  circum- 
stance that  forced  the  Lytle  brothers  into  the  logging  and  eventually  into  the 
lumber  business.  Mr.  Lytle  employed  John  D.  Sparling  to  act  as  foreman  of  the 
newly  acquired  plant  and  began  logging  operations.  Mr.  Sparling  has  remained 
with  the  company  continuously  since  and  is  still  superintendent  of  their  extensive 
camps,  their  success  being  largely  due  to  his  faithfulness  and  untiring  energy.  The 
business  having  been  forced  upon  Mr.  Lytle,  he  made  of  it  a  close  study,  for  it  was 
his  custom  to  do  thoroughly  anything  that  he  undertook.  Soon  it  began  to  show 
profits  and  gradually  the  operations  were  extended.  The  Lytle  brothers  began 
to  buy  timber,  which  at  that  time  sold*  at  a  very  low  figure  in  the  Grays  Harbor 
country.  They  continued  to  buy  and  at  the  same  time  increased  their  logging  oper- 
ations and  within  a  few  years  theirs  became  one  of  the  largest  logging  and  timber 
holding  concerns  of  the  Grays  Harbor  district.  Ever  studying  the  situation  rela- 
tive to  the  business,  Robert  F.  Lyljle  recognized  that  there  was  a  good  demand  for 
cedar  shingles  and  also  realized  that  cedar  logs  were  cheap,  and  he  had  himself 
acquired  considerable  cedar  land.  He  decided  to  build  a  shingle  mill  and  in  time 
his  plant  was  producing  the  largest  cut  of  any  shingle  mill  on  the  Pacific  coast 
and  constituted  the  nucleus  of  the  Lytle  mill  interests.  A  few  years  after  the 
building  of  the  shingle  mill  he  erected  a  sawmill  and  organized  the  company 
since  known  as  the  Hoquiam  Lumber  &  Shingle  Company.  The  boom  in  the 
lumber  market  preceding  1907  gave  the  company  an  impetus  and  the  mill  became 
one  of  the  largest  in  their  part  of  the  state,  working  ten  hours  per  day  with  a 
capacity  of  four  hundred  thousand  feet  of  lumber. 

It  was  about  191 1  that  Mr.  Lytle  opened  offices  in  Portland  and  removed  to 
that  city,  where  he  erected  a  magnificent  residence  and  invested  extensively  in 
property,  but  he  continued  to  spend  much  of  his  time  in  Hoquiam.  actively  directing 
his  manufacturing  and  logging  operations.  In  1913  he  platted  extensive  land 
holdings  along  the  East  Hoquiam  river,  just  north  of  the  city,  and  ofifered  it  as 
free  factory  sites,  seeking  by  that  means  to  promote  the  growth  of  the  city  by 
bringing  to  it  new  industries.  Optimistic  concerning  the  future  of  the  lumber 
trade,  he  began  the  promotion  of  several  new  companies  and  in  191 5  organized 
the  Panama-Eastern  Lumber  Company,  of  which  he  was  the  largest  stockholder 
and  which  erected  a  large  sawmill  on  the  East  Hoquiam  river,  almost  directly 
across  the  main  river  from  the  plant  of  the  Hoquiam  Lumber  &  Shingle  Com- 
pany. He  was  also  largely  instrumental  in  organizing  and  establishing  the  Wood- 
lawn  Mill  &  Boom  Company,  which  dredged  and  built  a  public  log  dump  and 
boom  and  also  erected  an  electric  shingle  mill— the  largest  on  the  harbor — with 
a  capacity  of  five  hundred  thousand  shingles  per  day.    Thus  the  business  interests 


74  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

of  Robert  F.  Lytle  grew  and  developed  until  the  extent  and  importance  of  his 
operations  placed  him  among  the  foremost  lumbermen  of  the  northwest. 

Mr.  Lytle  found  his  greatest  pleasure  in  his  success  in  that  it  afforded  him 
the  means  of  providing  most  liberally  for  his  family  and  his  beautiful  home  in 
Portland  was  an  evidence  of  his  devotion  to  their  interests.  He  was  a  prominent 
member  of  the  Elks  lodge  and  when  death  called  him  on  the  20th  of  May,  1916, 
when  he  was  about  sixty-two  years  of  age,  thus  terminating  the  only  illness  from 
which  he  had  ever  suffered,  funeral  services  were  conducted  in  the  Elks'  Home  in 
Hoquiam  according  to  the  ritual  of  the  order,  after  which  his  remains  were  taken 
to  Tacoma  for  interment.  Sincere  sorrow  at  his  passing  was  felt  not  only  by 
his  family  and  personal  friends  but  by  his  colleagues  and  contemporaries  in 
business  and  by  his  large  force  of  workmen,  who  ever  found  in  him  a  just  and 
considerate  employer,  one  who  recognized  the  rights  of  those  in  his  service  and 
marked  his  appreciation  of  their  faithfulness  and  ability  by  promotion  when 
opportunity  offered.  It  is  said  that  a  person  may  best  be  judged  by  his  conduct 
toward  inferiors  and  by  this  standard  Mr.  Lytle  stood  as  a  man  among  men,  for 
in  him  there  was  nothing  of  the  taskmaster  with  arbitrary  ironclad  rules.  His 
employes  were  his  fellowmen  and  were  treated  as  such.  His  was  a  splendid 
record  and  constitutes  an  important  chapter  in  the  history  of  Hoquiam's  develop- 
ment. 


LAURENCE  STEPHEN  BOOTH. 

Ability  is  much  like  that  "city  which  is  set  upon  the  hill  and  cannot  be  hid," 
for  ability  will  come  to  the  front  everywhere  and  must  eventually  win  the  rewards 
of  success.  This  fact  finds  deinonstration  in  the  career  of  Laurence  Stephen 
Booth,  who  is  now  vice  president  and  treasurer  of  the  Washington  Title  Insurance 
Company  of  Seattle,  the  largest  and  most  progressive  title  company  in  the  north- 
west. He  has  spent  practically  his  entire  life  in  this  state,  although  he  is  a  native 
of  Battle  Creek,  Michigan,  where  his  birth  occurred  March  26,  1861.  His  father, 
Manville  S.  Booth,  came  to  the  territory  of  Washington  in  1861  and  engaged  in 
business  in  Port  Townsend  and  Seattle.  He  was  auditor  of  King  county  from 
1875  until  1 88 1  and  was  otherwise  active  in  public  affairs  and  in  promoting  the 
early  progress  of  the  territory.  Manville  S.  Booth  married  Mary  Roe,  who  was 
born  in  England,  of  English  and  Irish  parentage. 

Reared  in  this  state,  Laurence  S.  Booth  attended  the  University  of  Washington 
from  1873  until  1875  inclusive  and  in  the  latter  year  entered  the  office  of  the 
county  auditor,  there  remaining  until  1887.  In  the  latter  year  he  became  engaged 
in  the  abstract  and  title  business  and  has  made  steady  progress  in  that  connection 
until  he  is  now  an  officer  of  the  largest  and  most  progressive  title  company  in  the 
northwest,  being  the  vice  president  and  treasurer  of  the  Washington  Title  Insur- 
ance Company  of  Seattle.  The  business  conducted  by  this  corporation  is  now 
extensive  and  its  returns  are  substantial.  His  standing  among  men  similarly 
engaged  is  indicated  in  the  fact  that  he  has  been  honored  with  the  presidency 
of  the  Washington  Association  of  Title  Men  and  is  now  the  president  of  the 
American  Association  of  Title  Men,  a  national  organization. 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  75 

On  the  I2th  of  April,  1893,  in  Seattle,  Mr.  Booth  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Miss  Nelle  M.  Crawford,  a  daughter  of  Ronald  C.  and  Elizabeth  Crawford,  who 
crossed  the  plains  to  Oregon  in  1847  and  are  now  both  living  in  Seattle.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Booth  now  have  five  children,  namely :  Edwin  S.,  Madeleine,  Elizabeth, 
Laurence  S.,  Jr.,  and  Evelyn  Beatrice, 

In  politics  Mr.  Booth  is  a  republican,  but  the  only  office  he  has  ever  filled  was 
that  of  deputy  auditor  of  King  county  from  1879  until  1886.  He  was  a  member 
of  the  first  amateur  baseball  organization  of  Seattle,  the  first  athletic  association, 
the  first  association  for  the  protection  of  game,  and  the  volunteer  fire  department. 
Moreover,  he  belonged  to  the  National  Guard  of  Washington  from  1884  until 
1896  and  was  commander  of  Company  B  of  the  First  Regiment  at  the  time  he 
resigned  and  severed  his  connection  with  the  organization.  His  religious  belief 
is  that  of  the  Catholic  church  and  he  is  a  fourth  degree  member  of  the  Knights  of 
Columbus.  He  is  also  well  known  in  club  circles,  holding  membership  with  the 
Seattle  Athletic  Club,  the  Arctic  Club,  the  Earlington  Golf  and  Country  Club  and 
the  Seattle  Golf  Club. 


VICTOR  A.  ROEDER. 


The  work  instituted  by  his  father,  Captain  Henry  Roeder,  of  beloved  pioneer 
memory,  has  been  continued  by  the  son,  Victor  A.  Roeder,  who  for  many  years 
has  conducted  an  extensive  general  real  estate,  loan  and  mortgage  business,  largely 
handling  his  own  properties,  and  who  since  1904  has  been  president  of  the  Belling- 
ham  National  Bank.  His  father  secured  as  a  donation  claim  three  hundred 
and  twenty  acress  of  land,  constituting  a  part  of  the  present  site  of  the  city,  and 
it  was  upon  that  property,  now  the  corner  of  Elm  and  Monroe  streets,  that  Victor 
A.  Roeder  was  born  August  13,  1861.  He  attended  the  public  schools  of  Belling- 
ham  to  the  age  of  fifteen  years  and  then  went  to  Vermilion,  Ohio,  where  he  con- 
tinued his  studies  in  the  public  and  high  schools  until  he  reached  the  age  of  twenty- 
two  years.  He  afterward  spent  a  year  as  a  student  in  Heald's  Business  College  of 
San  Francisco  and  upon  his  return  to  Bellingham  became  the  active  assistant  of  his 
father,  with  whom  he  was  engaged  in  the  real  estate  business  for  ten  years.  Victor 
A.  Roeder  then  went  to  the  Nooksak  river  and  established  a  postoffice  and  gen- 
eral mercantile  store  at  Nooksak  Ferry,  where  now  stands  the  town  of  Everson. 
After  remaining  there  for  four  years  he  disposed  of  his  business  and  returned  to 
Bellingham  owing  to  the  fact  that  his  father  was  then  well  advanced  in  years  and 
needed  his  assistance  in  the  management  and  control  of  his  business.  \  ictor  A. 
Roeder  then  took  over  the  management  of  his  father's  real  estate  interests  and  of 
the  Chuckanut  stone  quarry,  which  he  thus  controlled  until  his  father's  death  in 
1902,  when  the  estate  was  divided  between  himself  and  his  sister,  Mrs.  Charles 
Roth,  who  were  the  only  heirs. 

From  that  date  until  the  present  Victor  A.  Roeder  has  been  engaged  in  the 
general  real  estate,  loan  and  mortgage  business  and  has  gained  a  large  clientage. 
He  has  negotiated  many  important  realty  transfers  and  the  natural  rise  in  property 
values  owing  to  the  rapid  growth  of  the  city,  as  well  as  his  enterprising  business 
methods,  have  brought  to  him  constantly  increasing  success.     In  addition  to  his 


76  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

activities  in  that  field  Mr.  Roeder  became  associated  with  twelve  others  in  1904 
in  organizing  the  Bellingham  National  Bank,  of  which  he  has  since  been  the  presi- 
dent, with  William  AlcCnsh  as  vice  president  and  F.  F.  Handschy  as  cashier.  The 
bank  was  first  capitalized  for  one  hundred  thousand  dollars  and  entered  upon  an 
era  of  profitable  existence  as  indicated  by  the  fact  that  the  capital  stock  has  been 
increased  to  two  hundred  thousand  dollars  and  there  is  now  a  surplus  of  two 
hundred  and  seventy-five  thousand  dollars.  As  its  directing  head  Mr.  Roeder  is 
bending  his  energies  to  executive  control  and  the  policy  which  he  pursues  measures 
up  to  the  highest  financial  standards  and  ethics. 

In  Lynden,  Washington,  on  the  6th  of  October,  1886,  Mr.  Roeder  was  mar- 
ried to  Miss  Effie  B.  Ebey  and  they  have  become  the  parents  of  a  daughter  and  a 
son:  Ayreness,  now  the  wife  of  J.  R.  Bolster,  a  contractor  of  Bellingham;  and 
Henry  Victor,  twenty-six  years  of  age,  who  is  a  graduate  of  the  Bellingham  high 
school  and  is  now  statement  clerk  at  the  Bellingham  National  Bank. 

In  1896  Mr.  Roeder  was  elected  to  the  office  of  county  treasurer  and  filled 
that  position  until  1900.  He  has  always  preferred,  however,  that  his  public  duties 
should  be  done  as  a  private  citizen  and  in  that  connection  has  lent  his  aid  and 
cooperation  to  many  well  defined  plans  and  measures  for  the  general  good.  In  a 
review  of  his  life  one  is  led  to  the  reflection  that  to  accumulate  a  fortune  requires 
one  kind  of  genius ;  to  retain  a  fortune  already  acquired,  to  add  to  its  legitimate 
increment  and  to  make  such  use  of  it  that  its  possessor  may  derive  therefrom  the 
greatest  enjoyment  and  the  public  the  greatest  benefit  requires  quite  another  kind 
of  genius.  Mr.  Roeder  belongs  to  that  younger  generation  of  business  men  of 
Bellingham  who  are  called  upon  to  shoulder  responsibilities  differing  materially 
from  those  resting  upon  their  predecessors.  In  a  broader  field  of  enterprise  they 
find  themselves  obliged  to  deal  with  affairs  of  greater  magnitude  and  to  solve 
more  difficult  and  complicated  financial  and  economic  problems.  In  this  connec- 
tion Mr.  Roeder  has  proved  adequate  to  all  the  demands  made  upon  him  and  by 
reason  of  the  mature  judgment  which  characterizes  his  efforts  at  all  times  he 
stands  today  as  a  splendid  representative  of  a  prominent  banker  and  real  estate 
man  to  whom  business  is  but  one  phase  of  life  and  does  not  exclude  his  active 
participation  in  and  support  of  the  other  vital  interests  which  go  to  make  up 
human  existence. 


FRANK  G.  JONES. 


No  history  of  the  banking  business  in  Aberdeen  and  southwest  Washington 
would  be  complete  without  extended  reference  to  Frank  G.  Jones,  a  prominent, 
well  known  and  honored  man  whose  efforts  have  constituted  an  element  in  the 
business  development  of  the  district  in  which  he  resides. 

A  native  of  Tennessee,  he  was  born  in  McMinnville,  November  20,  i860,  son 
of  James  L.  and  Fannie  (Goodbar)  Jones,  both  natives  of  Tennessee  and  both 
members  of  families  prominent  in  the  social  and  commercial  history  of  that  state. 

Frank  G.  Jones  pursued  his  education  at  Cumberland  University  of  Lebanon, 
Tennessee,  and  at  the  Southwestern  University  of  Clarksville,  the  same  state. 
After  completing  his  education  he  entered  the  employ  of  his  uncle,  James  M. 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  77 

Goodbar,  of  Memphis,  Tennessee,  whose  concern,  Goodbar  &  Company,  was  one 
of  the  largest  shoe  wholesalers  and  manufacturers  in  the  south.  He  worked  up 
from  stock  boy  to  buyer  and  assistant  general  manager,  was  with  this  house  twenty 
years,  sold  out  his  interest  and  established  on  his  own  account  The  Frank  G. 
Jones  Shoe  Company,  which  he  built  up  to  a  large  business.  He  continued  in 
Memphis  until  1901,  when  he  moved  his  concern  to  Boston,  where  he  was  at  the 
head  of  a  large  wholesale  shoe  business  until  1905,  when  he  sold  out  his  interest 
there. 

Frank  G.  Jones  came  to  the  northwest  in  January,  1906,  and  to  Aberdeen  in 
June  of  the  same  year.  On  September  i,  1906,  he  opened  the  Chehalis  County 
Bank,  a  private  institution  with  a  capital  of  twenty-five  thousand  dollars,  the  first 
savings  bank  established  in  Chehalis  county.  In  1907  he  incorporated  his  bank 
and  organized  the  Union  Bank  &  Trust  Company  as  a  commercial  bank  operated 
jointly  with  the  Chehalis  County  Bank,  with  capital  of  fifty  thousand  dollars,  Mr. 
Jones  being  president  of  both.  The  banks  prospered  under  his  management, 
weathering  the  financial  panic  of  1907.  In  1909  he  increased  the  capital  stock 
of  the  Union  Bank  &  Trust  Company  to  one  hundred  thousand  dollars  and  con- 
verted it  into  a  national  bank  under  the  name  of  the  United  States  National 
Bank.  In  1910  the  Aberdeen  State  Bank  was  taken  over  by  Mr.  Jones  and  his 
associates  and  both  banks  were  operated  under  his  presidency  and  management 
until  June,  191 1,  when  they  had  deposits  of  six  hundred  and  forty-two  thousand 
dollars. 

Mr.  Jones  at  about  this  time  sold  his  interest  in  the  United  States  National 
Bank  to  the  Hayes  &  Hayes  Bank,  Aberdeen,  intending  to  continue  the  Chehalis 
County  Bank  as  a  savings  institution.  A  short  while  later  there  was  a  run  on 
his  bank  which  proved  disastrous,  but,  while  Mr.  Jones  lost  his  fortune,  be  it 
said  to  his  credit  he  elected  the  honorable  course  and  not  one  of  his  three 
thousand  eight  hundred  depositors  lost  a  penny.  A  few  months  later,  with  no 
capital  save  the  confidence  and  esteem  of  the  people  he  had  served,  he  estab- 
lished himself  in  the  general  insurance  and  safe  deposit  business.  Together 
with  his  eldest  son,  J.  M.  G.  Jones,  he  has  built  this  up  to  one  of  the  largest  of 
its  kind  in  southwest  Washington.  He  has  also  organized  and  is  secretary  and 
general  manager  of  the  Security  Savings  and  Loan  Society  of  Aberdeen,  a 
growing  institution. 

Mr.  Jones  was  one  of  the  organizers  of  the  Farmers  &  Lumberman's  Bank 
of  Elma,  Washington,  and  was  one  of  its  principal  stockholders.  He  also 
erected  the  building  and  organized  the  bank  at  Oakville,  Washington,  which  he 
shortly  afterwards  sold  out. 

Mr.  Jones  was  married  in  December,  1889,  in  Birmingham,  Alabama,  to 
Miss  Mary  Rogan.  Three  children  were  bom  to  them :  J.  M.  Goodbar,  twenty- 
six  years  old,  a  business  partner  with  his  father;  L.  Rogan,  twenty-one  years  of 
age ;  and  Ellen  Jane  Netherland,  fifteen  years  old.  Both  sons  have  enlisted  in 
the  United  States  navy  in  defense  of  their  country,  following  the  example  of 
their  forebears  who  fought  for  the  cause  of  liberty  in  the  Revolution  and  in  the 
Civil  war. 

Fraternally  Mr.  Jones  is  a  Mason,  including  the  degrees  of  Royal  Arch  and' 
the   Commandery.      In   matters  of  citizenhip  he  has   displayed  devotion  to  the 
general  good  and  no  plan  or  movement  has  sought  his  support  in  vain.     He  has 


78  WASHINGTON,,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

established  and  maintained  a  reputation  for  scrupulous  honesty,  high  moral 
character  and  business  integrity.  There  have  been  few  men  who  have  done 
more  to  further  progress  and  improvement  in  the  community  during  the  period 
he  made  Aberdeen  his  home  than  he  through  his  operations  in  financial  fields  and 
otherwise. 


JAMES  T.  QUIGG. 


James  T.  Quigg,  vice  president  of  the  Grays  Harbor  Construction  Company, 
was  born  at  St.  John,  New  Brunswick,  in  1864,  and  has  b^en  identified  with  the 
Pacific  coast  country  for  more  than  three  decades.  In  1885  he  left  New  Bruns- 
wick and  removed  to  Humboldt  county,  California,  and  there  resided  until  1897, 
when  he  made  his  way  to  the  Grays  Harbor  district,  where  he  has  since  remained. 
In  1904  he  entered  into  his  present  partnership  relation  with  Philip  J.  Mourant 
and  Milton  L.  Watson,  under  the  style  of  the  Grays  Harbor  Construction  Com- 
pany, and  through  the  interim  has  concentrated  his  efiforts  upon  the  development 
of  the  business,  his  specific  work  being  that  of  foreman  of  the  ship  carpentering 
and  pile  driving.  He  thoroughly  understands  this  branch  of  the  work,  so  that  he 
is  able  to  direct  the  efforts  of  the  men  who  serve  under  him  and  produce  the  best 
possible  results. 

In  1914  ]\Ir.  Quigg  was  married  to  Miss  Ellen  Miller,  a  native  of  Michigan, 
and  to  them  have  been  born  two  children,  James  T.  and  Charles  O.  Fraternally  he 
is  connected  with  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  He  and  his  wife 
have  a  wide  acquaintance  in  this  locality  and  sterling  traits  of  character  have  won 
them  high  regard.  Mr.  Quigg  has  always  made  good  use  of  his  time  and  oppor- 
tunities and  his  well  defined  plans  and  purposes  have  led  to  the  attainment  of 
substantial  success. 


FREDERICK  ORNES. 


Frederick  Ornes,  of  Mount  Vernon,  one  of  the  best  known  newspaper  men  of 
Washington,  w^ho  has  been  president  of  the  Washington  State  Press  Association, 
was  bom  in  iManitowoc,  Wisconsin,  March  30,  1871,  his  parents  being  Mads  and 
Marie  (Magnus)  Ornes,  both  natives  of  Norway.  He  pursued  his  education 
in  the  public  schools  of  his  native  city  and  after  working  for  a  time  in  a  store 
went  upon  the  road  as  a  traveling  salesman.  His  first  experience  in  the  news- 
paper field  came  to  him  as  cub  reporter  on  the  now  extinct  St.  Paul  Daily  Globe. 
In  1898  he  removed  westward  and  for  a  time  engaged  in  newspaper  work  in 
Butte,  Montana.  The  year  1901  witnessed  his  arrival  in  Skagit  county,  Wash- 
ington, and  in  May  1902,  he  purchased  the  Anacortes  American.  In  1903  he  also 
bought  a  half  interest  in  the  Anacortesan  and  established  in  Stanwood  a  paper 
known  as  the  Stanwood  Tidings.  In  May  of  the  same  year  he  purchased  the 
Argus,  so  that  he  became  closely  associated  with  newspaper  interests  in  his  part 
of  the  state.     Eventually  he  sold  his  interest  in  the  Tidings  and  disposed  of  the 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  79 

American,  but  in  September,  1914,  he  established  the  East  Stanwood  Bulletin, 
which  was  printed  on  the  Argus  press  and  was  suspended  in  1916. 

On  the  30th  of  October,  1902,  Mr.  Ornes  was  married  to  Miss  Susan  Lord 
Currier,  a  daughter  of  Airs.  Augusta  M.  Currier,  of  La  Conner.  She  died  June  4, 
1906.  On  the  29th  of  April,  1909,  Mr.  Ornes  wedded  Miss  Mabel  Hannay,  a 
daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  J-  K.  Hannay,  of  Edison,  Washington.  She,  too,  passed 
away  April  27,  1914. 

In  politics  Mr.  Ornes  has  always  been  a  stalwart  republican  and  has  done 
efifective  work  along  political  lines.  He  was  the  organizer  of  the  direct  primary 
campaign  in  Skagit  county  and  his  activities  have  had  marked  influence  in  mold- 
ing public  thought  and  opinion.  He  is  an  honorary  member  of  the  Sigma  Delta 
Chi,  a  journalistic  fraternity,  and  he  belongs  to  the  Mount  Vernon  Commer- 
cial Club. 


MITCHEL  HARRIS. 


Mitchel  Harris,  president  of  the  Harris  Dry  Goods  Company  of  Olympia,  is  a 
prominent  figure  in  the  business  circles  of  the  capital  city.  His  entire  life  has 
been  passed  in  the  Pacific  northwest  as  he  was  born  in  Salem,  Oregon,  September 
18,  1862.  His  father,  Isaac  Harris,  was  born  in  Russia  but  in  1854  settled  in 
California,  where  he  engaged  in  business  until  1858,  in  which  year  he  removed 
to  Oregon  City,  Oregon.  Subsequently  he  resided  in  Walla  Walla,  Washington, 
and  in  Helena,  Montana,  but  in  1869  estabHshed  his  home  in  Olympia,  where  he 
founded  the  business  now  conducted  under  the  name  of  the  Harris  Dry  Goods 
Company.  He  passed  away  in  1894,  when  sixty  years  of  age.  He  was  married 
in  New  York  City  to  Miss  Annie  Marcus,  a  native  of  that  city  and  of  German 
descent.  To  them  were  born  three  sons :  Henry,  who  is  a  practicing  physician 
of  San  Francisco ;  and  Gus  and  Mitchel,  who  are  partners  in  business. 

Mitchel  Harris  received  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Olympia,  as 
he  was  but  seven  years  of  age  when  his  parents  removed  there,  and  gained  his 
early  training  in  merchandising  under  the  guidance  of  his  father,  whom  he  as- 
sisted in  the  store.  As  time  passed  he  assumed  more  and  more  responsibility 
for  the  management  of  the  business  and  following  his  father's  death  he  and  his 
brother  Gus  became  proprietors  of  the  store.  It  is  housed  in  a  fine  structure 
ninety  by  one  hundred  and  twenty  feet  in  dimensions  and  the  stock  carried  is 
extensive  and  well  selected.  The  business  is  now  carried  on  under  the  name  of 
the  Harris  Dry  Goods  Company  with  Mitchel  Harris  as  the  president  and  the 
high  standards  established  by  the  father  have  been  maintained  throughout  the 
years.  The  store  is  systematically  organized  and  much  of  the  success  of  the 
business  has  been  due  to  the  cooperation  of  the  various  departments.  Mr. 
Harris  is  also  a  stockholder  and  director  of  the  Capital  National  Bank  of  Olympia. 

In  Portland,  Oregon,  March  13,  1892,  occurred  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Harris 
and  Miss  Toba  Lichtenstein.  of  San  Francisco,  by  whom  he  has  two  children : 
Mrs.  William  Taylor,  of  Seattle;  and  Selwyn  L.,  who  is  twenty-two  years  old  and 
is  now  engaged  in  business  with  his  father. 

Mr.  Harris  belongs  to  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  has  held  the  office  of  grand 


80  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

treasurer  of  the  state.  He  is  likewise  a  member  of  the  Thurston  Pioneer  and  His- 
toric Association.  For  three  terms  he  served  as  mayor  of  Olympia  and  during 
that  time  many  projects  for  the  good  of  the  city  were  brought  to  successful 
completion.  Through  the  exercise  of  enterprise  and  through  strict  adherence 
to  ethical  standards  he  has  gained  for  himself  an  enviable  place  in  business 
circles  and  has  won  the  esteem  and  good  will  of  all  who  have  come  in  contact 
with  him. 


JAMES  A.  KARR. 


The  history  of  Hoquiam  and  of  the  Grays  Harbor  country  cannot  be  better 
told  than  by  detailing  many  of  the  incidents  of  the  life  of  James  A.  Karr,  who 
lived  until  November,  1914,  to  tell  the  tale  of  the  wonderful  development  of  this 
section  of  the  country,  his  memory  forming  a  connecting  link  between  the  primitive 
past  and  the  progressive  present.  Fifty-seven  years  have  come  and  gone  since 
he  filed  upon  a  claim  in  Chehalis,  now  Grays  Harbor,  county,  in  i860,  being  then 
a  young  man  of  twenty-six  years.  Until  that  district  emerged  from  pioneer  con- 
ditions much  of  his  life  had  been  spent  upon  the  frontier,  for  Indiana  had  taken 
on  statehood  only  eighteen  years  before  he  was  born  on  Little  Indian  creek,  not 
far  from  Martinsville,  Indiana,  on  the  i8th  of  September,  1834.  His  earliest 
recollections  are  of  playing  on  the  sand  on  the  bank  of  that  creek  with  his  little 
sister,  who  died  after  he  left  home.  He  has^  no  memory  of  his  father  save  as  he 
saw  him  in  death,  the  grief  of  his  mptlfer  impressing  this  sight  indelibly  upon 
the  mind  of  the  three-year-old  boy.  However,  he  remembers  his  grandfather 
Karr,  a  fine  type  of  the  Irish  gentleman,  dressed  like  a  squire  in  leggings  and 
hunting  coat.  After  the  death  of  the  father,  the  mother  took  her  children  to  a 
place  near  the  home  of  her  brother,  Reuben  Stepp,  and  there  she  became  ac- 
quainted with  a  German  of  the  name  of  Evilsizer,  who  was  a  widower  with 
several  children.  She  became  his  wife  and  they  removed  to  Washington  County, 
Illinois,  Mr.  Evilsizer  having  there  purchased  a  farm  on  which  was  a  comfortable 
brick  residence.  He  expected  to  pay  for  this  place  by  the  sale  of  his  property  in 
Indiana,  but  not  getting  the  money  for  this,  he  was  compelled  to  leave  that  land 
and  settled  on  an  eighty-acre  tract  of  raw  land  for  which  his  son  had  contracted. 
Before  he  secured  title  to  that  place,  however,  he  became  ill  and  passed  away. 

James  A.  Karr  and  his  brother  Henry  had  worked  with  their  stepfather  in 
clearing  and  developing  the  land,  but  the  family  had  no  claim  to  it  and  were 
compelled  to  move  again.  They  went  to  live  in  a  little  house  beside  the  road  and 
such  was  now  the  financial  condition  of  the  family  that  the  mother  was  obliged  to 
hire  out  in  order  to  support  her  children.  At  length,  however,  they  rented  land 
and  the  two  boys,  who  had  a  yoke  of  oxen,  again  began  farming.  Later  the 
mother  married  a  Mr.  Storick  and  again  the  family  moved,  settling  on  a  good 
farm  in  St.  Clair  county,  Illinois,  not  far  from  St.  Louis.  There  was  much  hard 
work  to  be  done  in  the  further  clearing  and  cultivating  of  the  land  and  the  Karr 
brothers  did  their  full  share.  Mr.  Karr,  however,  recognized  that  his  step- 
brothers had  little  chance  in  life  because  of.  a  lack  of  education  and^  that  they 
would  always  have  to  depend  upon  severe  manual  labor.     He  often  expressed 


THE  NEW  YOM 
PUBLIC  LIBRARY 

ASTOR,,    LENOX 
TILDEN   FOUNDATION 


i 


JAMES  A.  KAEE 


MRS.  JAMES  A.  KARR 


THE   NEW  YOKK 
PUBLIC  UBRARY 


ASTOR,    LENOX 
TILDEN  FOUNDATION 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  85 

a  desire  to  attend  school  but  received  no  assistance  from  Air.  Storick,  althouo-h 
his  mother  encouraged  the  idea.  At  length,  feeling  that  if  he  obtained  an  educa- 
tion it  must  be  through  his  own  efforts,  he  left  home  at  the  age  of  fourteen  years 
and  hired  out  for  the  summer  at  a  wage  of  live  dollars  per  month.  At  harvest 
time  a  man  who  could  swing  a  cradle  or  could  bind  after  the  cradle  was  paid  a 
much  better  wage  than  the  regular  farm  hand,  and  Mr.  Karr  proved  that  he  could 
bind  as  well  as  men  of  twice  or  thrice  his  years.  Accordingly  he  did  work  of 
that  character,  earning  at  first  a  dollar  and  afterward  a  dollar  and  a  quarter  per 
day,  and  the  money  thus  gained  was  used  in  buying  books  and  clothing,  while 
by  working  on  Saturdays  and  morning  and  night  to  pay  for  his  board,  he  was 
able  to  attend  school  for  several  months  that  winter.  He  afterward  enterea 
upon  an  apprenticeship  to  the  brickmaker's  trade  and  the  money  which  he  earned 
through  the  summer  months  in  that  way  enabled  him  to  again  attend  school  in 
the  winter.  One  of  his  teachers,  John  Leeper,  a  graduate  of  McKendree  College 
of  Illinois,  proved  an  inspiration  to  him  and  assisted  him  in  every  possible  way 
in  his  studies.  For  six  years  Mr.  Karr  continued  working  in  the  summer  and 
attending  school  in  the  winter,  and  finally,  with  a  partner,  he  established  and 
operated  a  brickyard,  in  which  he  won  a  measure  of  success  that  enabled  him  to 
pay  his  board  and  devote  an  entire  year  to  study,  in  which  time  he  acquired  a 
knowledge  of  algebra,  natural  philosophy  and  astronomy.  He  was  particularly 
interested  in  the  first  named  and  his  fellow  students  often  called  upon  him  to 
assist  in  solving  their  problems.  After  that  year  he  taught  school  for  a  term  and 
then,  inclined  to  the  study  of  medicine,  he  spent  some  time  in  a  drug  store.  All 
these  experiences  not  only  proved  to  him  a  means  of  earning  a  living  at  that 
period  but  gave  him  a  fund  of  knowledge  upon  which  he  called  in  his  later  pioneer 
experiences  in  the  northwest.  He  became  one  of  the  first  school  teachers  and 
one  of  the  first  brickmakers  of  Chehalis  county  when  some  years  later  he  estab- 
lished his  home  in  the  Grays  Harbor  country. 

In  1855  following  the  discovery  of  gold  in  California,  Mr.  Karr  and  his 
brother  decided  to  go  to  the  mines,  as  this  would  enable  them  also  to  see  some- 
thing of  the  world.  Returning  to  Indiana,  Mr.  Karr,  who  was  then  twenty-one 
years  of  age,  settled  his  father's  estate,  his  share  thereof  being  about  five  hundred 
dollars,  which  furnished  the  brothers  the  capital  for  their  trip.  Proceeding  to 
New  York,  they  took  passage  on  a  steamer  bound  for  Panama,  crossed  the 
Isthmus  and  thence  proceeded  northward  to  California,  where  they  spent  three 
years  in  the  mines.  They  made  Nevada  City  their  headquarters  but  they  did  not 
find  the  expected  fortune  and  in  1858,  attracted  by  the  Eraser  river  excitement, 
started  north  as  passengers  on  the  Anne  Perry  from  San  Francisco  to  Whatcom. 
There  they  purchased  a  small  boat  to  go  from  Bellingham  Bay  to  the  Gulf  of 
Georgia  and  thence  up  the  Eraser  river.  Point  Roberts  extended  into  the  gulf  in 
a  southeasterly  direction  for  quite  a  distance.  South  of  this  point  the  water  was 
quiet  but  on  the  river  side  there  was  a  strong  surf  driven  on  by  northwest  wind. 
However,  they  decided  to  land  on  the  north  side  in  order  to  be  ready  to  make 
the  start  up  the  river,  but  while  so  doing  their  boat  filled  with  water  and  their 
provisions  received  a  soaking,  although  little  damage  resulted.  Proceeding  up 
the  river,  they  stopped  at  Fort  Yale  for  a  week  or  more  in  September,  1858,  and 
there  purchased  Sockeye  salmon  from  the  Indians,  which  furnished  them  many 
an  appetizing  meal  when  the  fish  was  fried  in  butter. 

Vdl.   11  —  5 


86  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

As  the  winter  was  coming  on  and  there  seemed  no  prospect  of  getting  gold, 
the  brothers  returned  southward,  accompanied  by  their  partner,  John  C.  Gove, 
who  became  one  of  the  pioneer  settlers  near  Seattle.  Purchasing  their  partner's 
interest,  they  started  back  to  the  Sound  and  at  Olympia  sold  their  boat  proceeding 
on  the  trail  with  their  packs.  They  spent  the  night  on  Mound  Prairie  at  the  home 
of  a  Mr.  Goodell,  whose  son  Ed  had  just  been  helping  to  make  a  survey  of  the 
land  at  Grays  Harbor.  He  told  of  the  country  and  of  the  river  called  Hoquiam, 
Mr.  Karr  and  his  brother  retaining  a  distinct  remembrance  of  this.  However, 
the  brothers  proceeded  to  Portland  to  spend  the  winter  and  there  entered  the 
employ  of  Colonel  Frush,  who  was  building  streets,  for  wdiich  purpose  he  hauled 
gravel  from  the  Willamette  river  bars.  In  securing  the  gravel  the  brothers  were 
able  to  earn  three  dollars  per  day  and  later  they  cut  cordwood,  for  which  they 
were  paid  a  dollar  and  a  half  per  cord  and  by  working  steadily  they  could  earn 
three  dollars  per  day  in  that  way.  In  the  spring  James  A.  Karr  ran  the  steam 
ferry  across  the  Columbia,  while  his  brother  drove  a  team,  but  they  never 
abandoned  the  idea  of  returning  to  Grays  Harbor  and  in  August  made  prepara- 
tions for  a  trip  into  the  new  country.  Returning  to  Olympia,  they  purchased 
cloth  from  which  they  made  a  tent  and  also  laid  in  supplies  for  the  trip.  Pro- 
ceeding on  their  way,  they  stopped  for  a  time  at  the  ranch  of  "Blockhouse"  Smith 
at  Cedarville  and  there  proceeded  to  make  a  canoe.  The  cedar  tree  which  they 
selected  for  the  purpose  split,  so  they  secured  a  green  cottonwood  growing  beside 
the  river.  They  hewed  this  out  and,  wishing  to  hasten  the  work,  they  piled  the 
canoe  full  of  branches  of  vine  maple,  to  w'hich  they  set  fire  but  found  that  they 
had  burned  a  hole  in  the  cottonw^ood.  A  thin  board,  oakum  and  pitch  repaired 
the  damage,  and  packing  their  supplies  in  the  canoe,  they  started  down  the  river, 
after  two  days  reaching  Cosmopolis,  which  was  the  metropolis  of  this  country. 
The  district  was  largely  an  unsettled  and  undeveloped  region,  the  Metcalfs  living 
at  Montesano  and  the  Scammons  at  Wynoochee,  which  was  the  county  seat. 
From  that  point  they  proceeded  to  Hoquiam,  rounding  Cow  Point  and  so  coming 
into  the  mouth  of  the  river.  They  landed  where  the  first  schoolhouse  was  after- 
ward built,  near  the  present  site  of  the  Hoquiam  sash  and  door  factory,  and 
proceeding  at  once  to  the  upland,  Mr.  Karr  found  a  level  green  bench  which 
dropped  abruptly  into  the  tidal  prairie,  where  the  grass  grew  tall  among  the  scat- 
tered forest  trees  and  a  spring  of  clear  water  issued  from  the  hillside.  So 
attractive  was  the  site  that  Mr.  Karr  decided  to  make  it  his  home,  while  his  brother 
chose  a  sight  across  the  river.  Then  they  began  building  a  cabin  of  hemlock  logs, 
chinked  with  dirt  and  soft  sandstone.  Inventive  ingenuity  was  brought  into  play 
to  protect  their  cabin  and  its  supplies  during  their  absence.  The  usual  latchstring 
hung  out,  but  instead  of  opening  the  latch,  as  was  customary,  when  it  was  pulled 
it  only  shut  the  more  tightly.  But  another  string  with  a  little  block  of  wood 
attached  was  brought  out  further  on  and  the  end  concealed  with  soft  earth.  It 
was  this  string  that  opened  the  door,  but  it  would  not  be  noticed  by  anyone  who 
was  not  accustomed  to  such  an  arrangement.  However,  one  day  when  the 
brothers  were  absent  from  home.  Captain  Winsor,  a  well  known  frontiers- 
man, called.  Used  to  all  kinds  of  pioneer  devices,  he  soon  discovered  their  ar- 
rangement and  he  and  his  party  entered  the  house,  built  a  big  fire  and  prepared  a 
meal  from  supplies  which  they  found.  After  they  were  gone  the  fire  in  some 
way  spread  to  the  timber,  burning  away  the  mantel  and  doing  some  damage  to  the 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  87 

interior,  but  fortunately  the  wet  hemlock  logs  of  which  the  cabin  had  been  built 
proved  fireproof,  so  the  Karrs  found  their  home  only  somewhat  dismantled. 
They  had  met  Captain  Winsor  and  his  friends,  who  told  them  of  their  visit  but 
little  dreamed  of  the  result  of  their  self-obtained  hospitality. 

As  time  passed  on,  the  brothers  continued  the  work  of  clearing  and  developing 
their  places  and  in  i860,  after  making  a  trip  to  Olympia  accompanied  by  Austin 
Young,  James  A.  Karr  established  a  brickyard  at  Cosmopolis,  hoping  thus  to 
obtain  ready  money  by  supplying  the  commodity  which  the  community  greatly 
needed.  He  was  not  only  associated  in  this  undertaking  with  his  brother  but 
was  also  joined  by  Austin  Young,  Ed  Campbell  and  David  Byles.  They  furnished 
brick  for  the  government  barracks  at  Chehalis  Point,  and  when  the  buildings 
were  abandoned  after  the  war,  Mr.  Campbell  bought  one  and  moved  it  to 
Hoquiam,  where  it  still  stands  on  the  east  side  of  the  river.  The  brick  manu- 
facturers furnished  brick  for  many  of  the  fireplaces  in  the  early  homes  and  the 
income  which  they  acquired  enabled  the  Karr  brothers  to  secure  many  needed 
supplies. 

Olympia  was  a  small  village  of  about  four  or  five  hundred  people  when  in 
March,  i860,  Mr.  Karr  went  there  to  enter  his  claim,  which  he  secured  as  a 
preemption,  the  homestead  law  having  not  then  been  passed.  When  Chehalis 
county  was  formed  James  A.  Karr  was  elected  its  first  auditor  and  filled  the 
ofifice  for  twelve  years.  There  was  no  salary  attached  to  the  position  but  the 
incumbent  was  allowed  fees  and  three  dollars  per  day  for  full  time.  In  the 
winter  of  i860  Mr.  Karr  taught  the  first  school  at  Cosmopolis  in  a  little  building 
erected  from  lumber  brought  from  Cedarville,  while  his  own  brickyard  supplied 
the  brick  for  the  fireplace  and  chimney.  He  had  twelve  or  fifteen  pupils,  for 
several  families,  including  the  Metcalfs,  Goodell,  Smith,  Byles  and  Young  fam- 
ilies, were  then  living  in  the  neighborhood.  Christmas  of  that  year  was  celebrated 
at  the  home  of  Mr.  Goodell,  with  speaking,  singing  and  a  general  good  time.  The 
families  of  the  neighborhood  gathered  and  the  invitation  was  also  extended  to  the 
soldiers  stationed  there.  It  was  feared  that  the  Indians,  knowing  that  war  was 
in  progress  among  the  whites  of  the  north  and  the  south,  might  go  upon  the 
warpath,  so  that  a  garrison  was  maintained  at  Chehalis  Point  and  a  blockhouse 
was  erected  at  Cedarville.  In  the  winter  of  1861-2  Mr.  Karr  engaged  in  teaching 
at  Montesano  and  as  there  was  little  money  in  the  neighborhood  he  was  largely 
paid  in  cattle,  so  that  when  he  was  ready  to  develop  his  farm  he  had  quite  a 
small  herd  of  excellent  cattle.  In  the  winter  of  1862-3  he  taught  at  Mound 
Prairie.  It  was  there  that  he  had  first  heard  of  Grays  Harbor  when  stopping 
at  the  Goodell  home  in  1859.  One  of  the  sons,  Ed  Goodell,  had  in  the  meantime 
married  and  removed  to  Forest  Grove  but  Mr.  Karr  met  him  again  at  the  close 
of  the  school  term  of  1863. 

It  was  an  occasion  that,  seemingly  trivial,  proved  a  most  momentous  one  in 
the  life  of  Mr.  Karr,  for  Mr.  Goodell  showed  him  the  picture  of  an  attractive 
looking  woman  saying  that  he  would  give  him  the  picture  if  he  would  take  it  to 
the  original.  In  a  spirit  of  fun  Mr.  Karr  took  the  picture  and  about  that  time, 
desiring  to  see  his  brother  on  business  matters  and  thinking  that  he  might  find 
work  at  harvesting  or  masonry  and  thus  bring  in  money  needed  for  carrying  on 
the  farm  at  Hoquiam,  he  started  for  the  place  where  his  brother  was  working, 
not  far  from  Hillsboro,  between   Portland  and  Forest  Grove,  Oregon.     In  the 


88  WASHINGTOX,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

course  of  a  conversation  with  the  woman  with  whom  his  brother  boarded  Mr. 
Karr  chanced  to  say  that  he  had  the  picture  of  a  very  nice  looking  girl.  On 
seeing  it  the  woman  exclaimed :  '"Why,  I  know  her.  That's  Abbie  Walker  and 
she  is  teaching  at  Hillsboro,  only  about  a  quarter  of  a  mile  away."  She  proposed 
that  they  visit  the  schoolhouse  about  the  time  the  school  would  be  closed.  This 
plan  was  carried  out  and  Mr.  Karr  walked  with  the  young  lady  to  her  boarding 
house,  which  was  some  distance  from  the  school.  The  old-time  pioneer  hospitality 
was  extended  him  by  the  people  of  the  house  and  after  remaining  there  through 
the  night  he  next  day  accompanied  the  young  lady  to  school  and  they  planned  a 
ride  together  to  her  home  at  Forest  Grove,  where  they  spent  the  following 
Saturday  and  Sunday.  The  acquaintance  progressed  rapidly  and  when  Miss 
Walker  spoke  of  making  a  trip  east  of  the  mountains  to  visit  the  scenes  of  her 
childhood  near  Spokane,  Mr.  Karr  replied  that  it  would  be  a  long,  tedious  journey 
and  he  wanted  her  to  go  to  Hoquiam  with  him.  An  immediate  marriage  was 
agreed  upon  and  was  celebrated  at  the  Walker  home  September  14,  1863,  the 
bride's  father,  the  Rev.  Elkanah  Walker,  being  the  officiating  clergyman,  assisted 
by  Rev.  Chamberlain  of  Portland,  who  was  then  visiting  at  their  home.  The 
wedding  trip  consisted  of  a  visit  to  the  State  Fair  at  Salem  and  a  trip  to  Mound 
Prairie. 

Air.  Karr  was  engaged  to  teach  the  Black  River  school  that  winter  and  in  the 
spring  he  went  to  the  farm  to  start  the  work,  his  wife  remaining  to  finish  out  the 
two  months  of  school.  In  the  latter  part  of  March  he  returned  and  accompanied 
his  wife  down  the  river  to  the  homestead  which  they  occupied  for  forty  years. 
They  earnestly  undertook  the  task  of  developing  the  place  and  the  labors  of  both 
were  soon  evident  in  its  transformation  and  improved  appearance.  The  first 
year  they  had  ten  cows  and  butter  constituted  their  chief  export.  Air.  Karr 
remained  continuously  upon  the  farm  save  for  the  years  1875,  1882  and  1893, 
when  he  represented  his  district  in  the  state  legislature.  Chehalis  was  a  repub- 
lican county,  but  as  it  did  not  contain  enough  people  to  form  a  district,  the 
legislature  resorted  to  gerrymandering  when  the  democrats  were  in  power  and 
Chehalis  was  attached  at  various  periods  to  different  districts.  It  was  first  joined 
to  Pierce,  and  although  a  republican  stood  no  chance  of  winning,  Mr.  Karr  made 
speeches  throughout  Pierce  county,  which  was  strongly  democratic.  At  that  time 
he  was  defeated,  but  when  Pierce  and  Chehalis  counties  were  again  joined  Mr. 
Karr  received  a  large  majority  in  Pierce  and  said  that  he  thought  the  speeches 
he  made  several  years  before  must  have  just  begun  to  take  efifect.  As  a  member 
of  the  legislature  he  carefully  considered  the  vital  questions  which  came  up  for 
consideration  and  gave  his  support  to  many  measures  which  have  been  far- 
reaching  in  their  beneficial  efifects.  He  always  kept  in  close  touch  with  the  ques- 
tions and  issues  of  the  day  from  the  time  when  he  acted  as  secretary  of  the  first 
political  meeting  held  in  Grays  Harbor  in  i860,  on  which  occasion  Governor 
Stevens  was  in  the  midst  of  his  campaign  for  delegate  to  congress. 

Mr.  Karr  actively  continued  the  work  of  the  farm  and  for  ten  years  the 
family  lived  in  the  original  log  cabin,  although  some  additions  and  improvements 
were  added  thereto.  In  1874  he  planned  to  build  a  new  home,  bringing  lumber 
from  Elma.  doors  and  window  sash  from  Tumwater  and  brick  from  a  schooner 
that  had  carried  its  cargo  from  Portland.  Mr.  Karr  quarried  the  stone  for  two 
fireplaces  from  the  bluflf  across  the  river  and  secured  shingles  at  Montesano. 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  89 

When  materials  were  thus  assembled  a  story  and  a  half  house  was  erected,  facing 
the  south  and  overlooking  the  waters  of  the  bay.  It  was  a  period  when  the 
settlers  had  to  depend  upon  their  own  labor  for  nearly  all  supplies  and  Mr.  Karr 
undertook  the  task  of  tanning  leather,  at  first  using  smartweed  and  other  ingre- 
dients from  the  east,  but  he  discovered  the  astringent  properties  of  hemlock  and 
alder  bark  and  from  those  made  his  tanning  materials.  After  producing  leather 
this  was  cut  up  and  shaped  into  boots  and  shoes  for  the  family,  Mr.  Karr  making 
the  lasts  and  pegs,  and  the  shoes  it  is  said  "made  up  in  durability  for  what  they 
lacked  in  elegance."  All  garments,  even  those  for  the  boys,  were  homemade 
and  raincoats  were  made  of  unbleached  cotton  soaked  in  linseed  oil.  Mr.  Karr's 
former  experience  as  a  drug  clerk  enabled  him  to  provide  remedies  for  his  family 
when  there  was  no  physician  near  at  hand  and  not  infrequently  he  was  called  upon 
to  prescribe  for  his  neighbors.  He  contributed  to  the  social  enjoyment  of  the 
community  by  his  violin  music,  having  studied  in  Nashville,  Illinois,  and  after- 
ward in  Nevada  City,  California.  While  teaching  at  Cosmopolis  he  gave  instruc- 
tion in  music  as  well  as  in  the  common  branches.  It  was  at  Mr.  Karr's  suggestion 
that  a  trail  was  opened  from  Elma  to  Olympia  over  which  horses  and  cattle  could 
be  driven,  and  this  trail  proved  the  predecessor  of  the  stage  road  when  a  stage 
line  brought  the  community  into  seemingly  close  connection  with  the  capital. 
Later  Mr.  Karr  and  Mr.  Campbell  were  owners  of  a  big  shovel-nosed  canoe,  with 
which  they  took  their  farm  produce  up  the  river  in  the  fall,  finishing  the  journey 
by  wagon,  and  on  the  return  they  brought  with  them  provisions  to  last  for  a  year. 
They  had  little  trouble  with  the  Indians  in  that  locality,  although  when  the 
Modoc  war  was  in  progress  it  seemed  that  there  might  be  an  uprising  at  Grays 
Harbor. 

"Mr.  and  Mrs.  Karr  became  the  parents  of  twelve  children,  namely:  Mary 
Olive,  the  wife  of  H.  L.  Gilkey,  who  is  cashier  of  the  First  National  Bank  of 
Southern  Oregon  at  Grants  Pass,  Oregon;  Beatrice  Abigail,  now  Mrs.  H.  B. 
McNeill,  of  Aberdeen ;  Elkanah  Walker,  deceased ;  Cyrus  James,  who  is  captain 
of  the  lightship  Umatilla,  stationed  near  the  Bay  station ;  Henry  Anderson,  twin 
of  Cyrus,  who  died  at  the  age  of  fourteen;  Phoebe  Rose,  now  ]\Irs.  Johnson,  of 
Centfalia;  John  Ross,  a  twin  of  Phoebe,  who  is  a  resident  of  North  Yakima; 
Ruth,  now  the  wife  of  J.  S.  McKee.  of  Hoquiam ;  William  Hay,  deceased; 
Eunice  Viola,  who  resides  with  her  mother  in  North  Yakima;  Levi  Zebulon,  a 
resident  of  North  Yakima  ;  and  Arthur  Thompson,  of  North  Yakima,  who  married 
Harriet  Chadwick,  a  daughter  of  Judge  Chadwick.  On  the  14th  of  September. 
1913,  at  North  Yakima.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Karr  celebrated  their  golden  wedding 
anniversary. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Karr  gave  their  children  good  educational  opportunities.  School 
was  held  during  the  summer  months,  and  when  the  term  was  over,  the  big  family 
bedroom  at  home  was  converted  into  a  schoolroom,  with  homemade  desks,  and 
the  parents  acted  as  instructors  to  their  children  until  the  older  sisters  were 
able  to  assume  the  task  of  teaching.  Mr.  Karr  was  advanced  in  his  ideas  concerning 
education  and  believed  firmly  that  girls  should  be  given  the  same  chance  as  boys 
and  accordingly  his  daughters  received  as  good  educational  advantages  as  his  .sons. 
Three  daughters  graduated  from  the  University  of  Washington  and  Mrs.  McKee 
has  a  Master  of  Arts  degree  and  is  a  member  of  Phi  Beta  Kappa,  admission  to 
which  is  gained  only  by  high  scholarship.    Mr.  Karr  took  a  great  deal  of  pride  in 


90  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

Mrs.  McKee's  fine  scholastic  record.  In  winter  a  society  was  formed  which 
was  practically  a  parliamentary  law  club — the  first  on  the  Harbor — and  Mr. 
Karr  acted  as  president.  His  children  received  training  therefore  along  that 
line  and  the  instruction  has  proven  valuable  in  later  years.  With  the  passing  of 
pioneer  conditions  the  Karr  farm,  owing  to  the  progressive  spirit  of  the  owner, 
took  on  all  of  the  improvements  of  modern  times  and  through  his  business  ability 
Mr.  Karr  won  very  substantial  success,  his  estate  becoming  valuable.  In  1904 
the  family  removed  to  North  Yakima,  where  his  last  years  were  spent  and  where 
his  widow  still  resides.  He  died  of  apoplexy  on  the  night  of  November  4,  1914. 
He  had  been  keenly  interested  in  the  general  election  which  took  place  on  the 
preceding  day  and  particularly  in  the  fate  of  the  prohibition  law,  had  voted  and 
seemed  in  his  usual  health.  He  was  a  stanch  republican  in  his  political  belief  and 
fraternally  was  a  Mason  and  a  charter  member  of  the  Hoquiam  lodge  of  that 
order.  Although  there  were  many  happy  memories  of  early  times,  he  looked 
back  with  no  sigh  of  regret  to  the  past  but  rejoiced  in  the  progress  of  the  present 
and  kept  in  touch  with  the  trend  of  modern  thought.  He  had  passed  the  eightieth 
milestone  on  life's  journey  when  called  by  death,  but  old  age  need  not  suggest  as 
a  matter  of  course  idleness  and  want  of  occupation.  There  is  an  old  age  which 
grows  stronger  and  brighter  mentally  and  morally  as  the  years  go  on  and  gives 
out  of  its  rich  stores  of  wisdom  and  experience  for  the  benefit  of  others.  Such 
was  the  record  of  Tames  A.  Karr. 


JOHN  NORMAN. 


John  Norman,  of  Everett,  Washington,  was  born  in  the  city  of  Sarpsborg. 
Norway,  August  26.  1856.  His  parents  were  Iver  and  Grethe  (Olsen)  Johannes- 
sen,  who  had  twelve  children,  of  whom  John  is  the  seventh  in  order  of  birth. 
During  nearly  all  of  his  active  life  his  father,  Iver,  served  his  community  as 
"lensmand,"  an  official  whose  duties  are  similar  to  those  of  our  sherifif  and 
county  judge.  The  office  in  Norway,  however,  is  filled  by  appointment  at  the 
hands  of  the  king.  He  lived  and  died  in  the  city  of  Sarpsborg  and  was  a  very 
prominent  and  influential  citizen  till  the  time  of  his  death  in  1874  at  the  age  of 
sixty-three  years.  Mr.  Norman's  mother  reached  the  ripe  old  age  of  eight-four 
and  passed  away  in   1902. 

In  his  native  land,  Mr.  Norman  finished  his  common  school  education,  after 
which  he  entered  a  private  business  college,  where,  besides  mastering  the  regu- 
lar business  courses,  he  devoted  considerable  time  and  study  to  foreign  languages. 
At  the  age  of  eighteen  years  his  student  days  ended  and  he  was  then  initiated 
into  active  business  as  a  clerk  in  a  clothing  and  dry  goods  store  owned  and  op- 
erated by  his  two  elder  brothers,  with  whom  he  remained  for  eight  years.  At 
this  time,  like  many  other  young  Norwegians,  Mr.  Norman  succumbed  to  a  long 
growing  desire  for  a  larger  field  of  action  and  so  he  severed  his  home  ties  and 
embarked  for  the  United  States.  He  went  to  New  York,  July  6,  1884,  and  re- 
mained there  six  months.  From  there  he  journeyed  to  Omaha,  Nebraska,  where 
for  six  years  he  was  employed  by  the  leading  dry  goods  and  shoe  firms  of  that 
city.     He  continued  v/estward  and  settled  in  Seattle,  where  he  spent  a  year.     He 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  91 

was  the  first  and  only  clerk  in  what  is  today  one  of  the  leading  department  stores 
of  Seattle,  the  Bon  Marche.  Accepting  an  offer  of  a  better  position  with  a  Tacoma 
firm  he  then  entered  the  employ  of  Hans  Torkelson,  dealer  in  clothing  and  men's 
furnishings,  with  whom  he  continued  for  two  years  when  he  resigned  at  the  call  of 
a  still  more  promising  opening  in  Everett. 

It  was  on  the  i8th  of  March,  1893,  that  Mr.  Norman  landed  in  Everett.  He 
was  then  in  his  very  best  years  and  possessed  considerable  business  experience. 
He  continued  in  the  clothing  line,  being  for  a  brief  period  employed  by  the  United 
States  Clothing  Company,  then  one  of  the  largest  establishments  of  its  kind  in  the 
state.  By  this  time  Mr.  Norman  had  served  a  long  and  thorough  apprenticeship 
working  for  others.  He  now  commenced  business  of  his  own,  opening  the  third 
clothing  store  in  Everett.  Business  enterprise  in  Everett  has  never  had  a  worthier 
representative.  He  is  wide-awake,  alert  and  progressive.  The  fact  that  from 
a  very  inauspicious  beginning  his  business  has  today  grown  to  a  size  and  impor- 
tance second  to  none  in  Everett  speaks  amply  for  these  qualities  in  Mr.  Norman. 

His  establishment  is  known  as  the  Norman  Suit  House,  with  Norman  as 
the  sole  proprietor.  His  patronage  is  now  very  large  and  he  carries  everything  in 
the  line  of  men's  clothing  that  the  clothing  market  affords,  while  his  reasonable 
prices  and  honorable  dealing  have  secured  to  him  a  continually  growing  success. 
Mr.  Norman  lives  at  his  own  home,  3201  Hoyt  avenue,  which  is  one  of  the  finest 
that  Everett  can  boast ;  but  besides  this  he  has  extensive  property  holdings  both 
in  and  outside  of  the  city.  He  has  often  extended  his  efforts  into  fields  other  than 
the  clothing  business  and  is  at  present  stockholder  and  president  of  the  Scan- 
dinavian American  Savings  and  Loan  Association,  with  headquarters  in  Everett, 
which  has  an  authorized  capitalization  of  two  and  one-half  million  dollars. 

On  the  ist  of  September,  1885,  at  Omaha,  Nebraska,  Mr.  Norman  was  united 
in  marriage  to  Miss  Lena  Pederson,  also  of  Sarpsborg,  Norway.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Norman  have  three  children,  namely  :  Victor  Hugo,  born  July  8,  1886,  now  en- 
gaged in  the  brokerage  business  in  Los  Angeles,  California;  Ethel  Evelyn,  now 
the  wife  of  Glen  H.  Newport,  a  diamond  miner  of  South  Africa;  and  Melvin  Vol- 
taire, born  in  Tacoma,  March  16,  1893,  and  also  living  in  Los  xA.ngeles. 

In  Mr.  Norman's  make-up  there  is  a  very  strong  and  pronounced  social  ele- 
ment. He  is  an  ardent  lover  of  music  and  song.  For  twenty-four  years  he  has 
been  an  active  member  of  the  Norwegian  Singing  Society  of  Everett,  in  which 
he  has  always  been  a  leading  spirit.  To  this  society  and  to  singing  and  music 
generally  he  has  given  much  of  both  time  and  money.  He  has  repeatedly  opened 
his  beautiful  home  to  the  entertainment  of  the  singers  and  some  of  the  darkest 
and  most  discouraging  periods  in  the  history  of  the  society  have  been  bridged  only 
through  Mr.  Norman's  energetic  work  and  spirit.  He  was  made  the  first  presi- 
dent of  the  Pacific  Coast  Norwegian  Singers'  Association,  of  which  he  is  at  pres- 
ent the  vice  president  and  which  has  as  constituent  members  about  seventeen 
Norwegian  singing  societies  from  the  entire  Pacific  coast. 

In  politics  Mr.  Norman  is  a  progressive  republican,  but  he  has  never  sought 
public  office,  but  keeps  well  informed  on  the  live  questions  and  issues  of  the  day. 
In  local  affairs  he  can  always  be  counted  on  for  co-operation  in  any  plan  or 
measure  for  the  general  good.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Everett  Commercial  Club, 
holds  membership  with  Fir  Camp,  No.  5385,  M.  W.  A.,  of  Everett,  and  the 
Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  is  a  member  of  the  Sons  of  Norway. 


92  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

Mr.  Norman  is  a  splendid  type  of  the  self-made  man  who  has  used  his  talents 
and  opportunities  well  with  the  result  that  he  has  gained  for  himself  a  host  of 
friends  and  a  respected  place  in  the  commercial  circles  of  the  northwest. 


JOHN  M.  WEATHERWAX. 

The  name  of  John  M.  Weatherwax  is  inseparably  interwoven  with  the  history 
of  Aberdeen  and  the  old  Chehalis  county.  Along  various  lines  his  activities  have 
promoted  public  progress  and  some  of  the  most  extensive  and  important  features 
in  the  business  development  of  the  region  owe  their  establishment  and  continued 
success  to  him.  Aberdeen  therefore  mourned  the  loss  of  one  of  her  most  valued 
and  honored  citizens  when  he  passed  away  on  the  19th  of  July,  1896,  at  the  age 
of  sixty-eight  years. 

Mr.  Weatherwax  was  a  native  of  New  York,  born  February  14.  1828,  and 
for  many  years  he  engaged  in  the  lumber  and  logging  business  in  Michigan,  resid- 
ing at  Stanton,  that  state.  The  farsighted  lumberman  is  ever  looking  for  new  and 
advantageous  fields  of  operation  and  therefore  John  M.  Weatherwax  turned  his 
attention  to  the  northwest,  recognizing  its  splendid  resources  for  the  development 
of  the  lumber  industry.  In  1884  he  came  to  Aberdeen,  where  he  formed  the 
acquaintance  of  Samuel  Benn.  who  agreed  to  give  Mr.  Weatherwax  an  interest 
in  the  town  site  if  he  would  build  a  lumber  mill.  The  proposition  was  accepted 
and  machinery  was  shipped  from  Michigan  by  rail  and  by  way  of  the  Great  Lakes 
to  the  Atlantic  coast  and  then  around  Cape  Horn  and  up  the  Pacific,  eventually 
reaching  Aberdeen.  Some  of  that  machinery  is  still  in  use  in  the  mill  which 
Mr.  Weatherwax  established  and  which  is  still  being  operated  by  the  Anderson- 
Middleton  Company.  With  the  establishment  of  the  business  the  J.  M.  Weather- 
wax Company  was  organized  and  later  it  was  reorganized  under  the  style  of  the 
J.  M.  Weatherwax  Lumber  Company,  thus  continuing  until  the  death  of 
the  founder  and  promoter,  who  remained  up  to  that  time  the  active  head  of  the 
concern,  his  sons  having  in  the  meantime  become  his  associates  in  the  business. 
Not  only  did  he  figure  prominently  in  connection  with  the  lumber  industry  of  his 
section  but  also  contributed  in  very  large  measure  to  the  development  and 
improvement  of  the  city  of  Aberdeen  through  his  building  and  real  estate  opera- 
tions. He  assisted  in  platting  what  was  known  as  Weatherwax  and  Benn's  first 
and  second  additions  to  the  city  and  during  the  first  years  of  his  residence  in 
Aberdeen  he  erected  many  houses,  probably  fifty  in  all.  He  was  also  largely 
instrumental  in  securing  the  establishment  of  various  business  enterprises  in  the 
city.  He  built  the  Catholic  Hospital  of  Aberdeen,  but  his  logging  and  lumber 
interests  were  his  chief  activity.  In  this  connection  he  built  the  first  schooner, 
the  J.  M.  Weatherwax,  and  it  is  still  in  use. 

Before  leaving  Michigan  Mr.  Weatherwax  was  married  in  that  state  to  Miss 
Mattie  Keyes,  a  native  of  Michigan,  who  passed  away  there  in  1882.  They 
were  the  parents  of  five  children,  of  whom  four  are  living,  C.  B.,  J.  G.,  Mrs. 
Fern  Sherwood  and  Cliff  M. 

In  his  political  views  Mr.  Weatherv^ax  was  always  an  earnest  and  stalwart 
republican,   giving   unfaltering   allegiance   to   the   party,   and   at   one   time    was 


JOHN  M.  WEATHERWAX 


1  n  ii    i\a  vv    I ORK 

PUBLIC  LIBRARY 

ASTOR,    LENOX 
TILDEN   FOUNDATION 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  95 

mayor  of  Aberdeen.  Undoubtedly  other  political  honors  would  have  been  con- 
ferred upon  him  but  his  ambition  was  in  other  directions.  He  assisted  largely, 
however,  in  every  plan  and  movement  for  the  upbuilding  of  the  city  and  was  a 
most  generous  contributor  toward  the  erection  of  the  various  churches  of  Aber- 
deen. The  recognition  of  his  public  spirit  on  the  part  of  his  fellow  townsmen 
is  indicated  in  the  fact  that  the  new  high  school  building  of  Aberdeen,  recently 
erected,  has  been  called  the  J.  M.  Weatherwax  high  school  in  his  honor.  He  was 
an  exemplary  Mason  and  in  the  order  rose  to  the  rank  of  Knight  Templar.  Very 
charitable,  he  was  constantly  extending  a  helping  hand  where  aid  was  needed  and 
such  were  his  personal  characteristics  that  he  won  not  only  the  esteem  but  the 
love  of  all  with  whom  he  came  in  contact,  and  his  memory,  enshrined  in  the 
hearts  of  all  who  knew  him,  remains  as  a  blessed  benediction  to  those  who  were 
closely  associated  with  him. 


CLIFF  M.  WEATHERWAX. 

Cliff  M.  Weatherwax,  who  for  three  decades  has  been  a  resident  of  Aberdeen, 
is  now  at  the  head  of  extensive  and  important  lumber  interests  as  manager  and 
treasurer  of  the  Aberdeen  Lumber  &  Shingle  Company.  He  was,  as  it  were,  "to 
the  manner  born,"  for  he  was  reared  to  this  business,  early  becoming  the  assist- 
ant of  his  father,  who  was  one  of  the  pioneer  lumbermen  of  the  northwest  and 
M'hose  sketch  is  given  above. 

The  birth  of  Cliff  \l.  Weatherwax  occurred  in  Stanton,  Michigan,  in  1878, 
and  he  Avas  twelve  years  of  age  when  in  1890  he  arrived  in  Aberdeen.  His  early 
education  was  acquired  in  the  public  schools  and  after  graduating  from  the  high 
school  of  Aberdeen  he  spent  two  years  at  the  University  of  Washington,  one  year 
at  Leland  Stanford  University  and  three  years  at  Harvard,  graduating  from  the 
last  named  university  with  the  class  of  1901  after  completing  the  academic  course. 
His  business  training  in  logging  and  lumbering  was  received  under  the  direction 
of  his  father  and  along  this  line  he  has  always  continued  his  operations,  which 
have  been  of  constantly  growing  volume  and  importance.  In  1901  he  organized 
the  Chehalis  County  Logging  &  Timber  Company,  of  which  he  continued  as 
president  until  the  business  was  sold  in  1907.  In  1902  he  formed  a  partnership 
with  John  Soule,  E.  S.  Hartwell  of  Chicago,  and  C.  F.  White  of  Seattle,  and 
they  continued  business  under  the  name  of  the  Chehalis  County  Logging  &  Timber 
Company  until  1907,  when  through  Mr.  White  the  Grays  Harbor  Commercial 
Company  purchased  the  interests  of  the  Aberdeen  owners.  In  1908  Mr.  Weather- 
wax had  bought  out  the  Aberdeen  Lumber  &  Shingle  Company,  which  was  incor- 
porated in  1899,  with  Edward  Hurlbut,  J.  M.  Hackett,  A.  H.  Farnum  and  Sam 
McClymont  as  the  owners.  When  by  purchase  the  interests  of  Messrs.  Hurlbut, 
Hackett  and  Farnum  passed  into  the  hands  of  Mr.  Weatherwax,  he  became 
treasurer  and  manager  of  the  company,  with  Sam  McClymont  as  the  president 
and  E.  T.  Taylor  as  the  secretary.  The  immense  plant  of  the  company  has 
practically  been  built  up  by  Mr.  Weatherwax  and  now  has  a  daily  capacity  of  one 
hundred  and  eighty  thousand  feet.  They  manufacture  lumber,  lath  and  shingles, 
having  a  large  electric  shingle  mill  and  dry  kilns  which  are  of  the  latest  improved 


96  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

pattern.  In  the  mills  they  employ  one  hundred  and  fifty  men  and  they  also  operate 
their  own  logging  camps  in  township  21,  range  9,  Grays  Harbor  county.  In 
addition  to  his  immense  interests  in  that  connection  Mr.  Weatherwax  figures  in 
financial  circles  as  a  director  of  the  United  States  Trust  Company,  and  he  has 
directly  contributed  to  the  improvement  of  the  city  in  the  erection  of  the  Weather- 
wax  building,  a  large  office  structure,  and  the  Weatherwax  apartments. 

In  1902  Mr.  Weatherwax  was  united  in  marriage  to  Mrs.  Auli  M.  Giddings, 
of  Seattle,  and  in  the  social  circles  of  the  city  their  position  is  one  of  leadership. 
Mr.  Weatherwax  belongs  to  the  Grays  Harbor  Golf  Club,  the  Tacoma  Golf  and 
Country  Club,  the  Tacoma  Union  Club,  the  Arlington  Club  of  Portland,  the 
University  Club  of  Portland,  the  University  Club' of  Seattle  and  the  Santa  Barbara 
(Cal.)  Country  Club.  His  interest  in  civic  affairs  is  manifest  in  many  tangible 
ways  of  a  most  helpful  character.  He  served  two  years  on  the  Aberdeen  city 
council  and  for  eight  years  has  been  a  member  of  the  school  board,  being  its 
president  for  over  five  years  of  that  time.  The  J.  M.  Weatherwax  high  school 
building,  a  fine  modern  structure,  was  dedicated  to  the  memory  of  his  father. 
1.  M.  Weatherwax.  The  cause  of  education  has  always  found  in  Cliff  M.  Weather- 
wax a  stalwart  champion.  All  who  know  him  speak  of  him  in  terms  of  high 
regard,  and  he  is  honored  and  respected  by  all,  not  alone  by  reason  of  the  success 
which  he  has  achieved  but  also  owing  to  the  straightforward  business  policy 
which  he  has  ever  followed. 


HENRY  L.  YESLER. 


Mr.  Yesler  was  born  in  Washington  county,  Maryland,  in  1810.  and  died  in 
Seattle,  December  15,  1892.  His  early  years  were  spent  in  toil  and  during  his 
school  days  he  lived  in  a  log  cabin  where  he  obtained  a  rudimentary  English 
education,  but  the  advantages  he  there  enjoyed  were  supplemented  later  on  by 
severe  study  during  the  time  he  had  to  spare  while  acquiring  the  trade  of  carpenter 
and  millwright.  In  1830  he  removed  to  Alassillon.  Ohio,  where  for  nineteen  years 
he  was  engaged  in  the  sawmill  business.  In  185 1  he  went  to  Oregon  and  for  a 
short  time  worked  at  his  trade  in  Portland.  From  there  he  went  to  California 
and  for  a  brief  period  operated  a  mine  at  Marysville.  About  this  time  he  became 
acquainted  with  a  sea  captain  who  had  been  trading  on  Puget  Sound,  and  from 
him  acquired  a  definite  knowledge  of  the  wonderful  harbors  on  the  Sound  and 
the  wealth  of  timber  that  lay  adjacent  to  its  waters.  Yesler  thought  he  saw  a 
great  future  in  the  lumber  trade  on  Puget  Sound,  so  he  took  ship,  landing  upon 
the  site  of  the  future  Seattle  in  the  fall  of  1852.  At  this  time  there  were  only 
a  few  cabins  located  in  the  woods  close  to  the  shore,  and  the  few  settlers,  although 
they  had  selected  their  claims,  had  not  filed  them  in  the  land  office,  which  at  that 
time  was  at  Oregon  City.  Upon  Yesler  informing  them  of  his  determination 
to  start  a  sawmill,  they  readjusted  their  claims  so  as  to  allow  him  to  take  up  a 
claim  adjoining  the  shore,  very  near  what  is  now  the  foot  of  Yesler  avenue.  In 
the  beginning  of  1853  his  modest  sawmill  was  put  in  operation.  It  was  the  first 
steam  sawmill  on  Puget  Sound,  and  its  location  at  Seattle  at  once  gave  that  place 
an  important  position  among  the  tiny  settlements  which  had  been  made  here  and 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  97 

there  upon  the  edge  of  the  unexplored  forests  which  stretched  away  in  every 
direction  from  the  waters  of  the  Sound.  In  the  early  days  of  this  mill  almost  the 
only  available  laborers  were  Indians,  whom  Mr.  Yesler  employed  in  large  num- 
bers, treating  them  so  honestly  and  kindly  that  in  the  difficulties  of  1855  and  1856 
he  was  able  to  be  of  the  greatest  service  to  the  territory.  Near  the  end  of  the 
war,  at  the  request  of  Governor  Stevens,  he  made  a  hazardous  trip  to  the  hostiles 
to  propose  terms  for  agreement.  After  carrying  the  reply  of  the  chiefs  to  the 
governor,  he  went  a  second  time  to  the  hostile  camp,  accompanied  by  only  two 
friendly  Indians,  and  brought  back  with  him  100  of  the  Indians  lately  upon  the 
warpath,  delivering  them  at  the  executive  mansion.  Upon  another  occasion  he 
saved  the  settlement  from  massacre  by  timely  warning  sent  to  the  naval 
authorities. 

When  the  territory  was  organized  Mr.  Yesler  was  made  county  auditor  and 
held  the  office  several  terms.  He  was  commissioner  of  King  county  several 
times  and  was  twice  mayor  of  Seattle.  During  his  last  term  as  mayor,  in  1886, 
occurred  the  anti-Chinese  riot,  and  although  not  a  friend  of  foreign  labor  he  did 
all  in  his  power  to  suppress  mob  violence.  Mr.  Yesler  was  originally  a  democrat 
in  political  faith  but  following  the  great  Civil  war  was  allied  with  the  republi- 
cans. He  was  not,  however,  an  intense  partisan,  and  never  had  any  desire  for 
political  distinction.  The  positions  he  was  called  upon  to  fill  were  in  the  line  of 
duties  such  as  a  citizen  deeply  interested  in  the  public  welfare  could  not  refuse 
to  accept. 

It  would  be  difficult  for  those  only  acquainted  with  the  great  and  flourishing 
city  of  Seattle  of  today  to  realize  the  important  part  the  sawmill  of  Henry  Yesler 
played  in  the  primitive  days.  For  years  it  was  almost  the  sole  industry  of  the 
place,  and  through  it  may  be  traced  the  primary  cause  which  determined  the 
supremacy  of  Seattle.  It  was  the  pioneer  enterprise  of  what  has  grown  to  ho 
a  giant  industry  which  now  exists  as  a  notable  part  of  the  world's  commerce. 

The  following  account  of  Mr.  Yesler's  business  activities  appeared  in  the 
Post-Intelligencer  of  the  issue  of  December  16,  1892:  "While  of  late  years  Mr. 
Yesler  has  been  largely  interested  in  building  and  real  estate  operations,  he  con- 
tinued to  conduct  his  sawmill  at  Seattle  until  shortly  before  the  great  fire,  and 
has  since  been  engaged  in  the  business  on  Lake  Washington,  at  a  place  named 
Yesler.  With  the  great  tide  of  immigration  to  the  Sound  which  these  latter 
years  have  witnessed  Mr.  Yesler's  townsite  property  has  increased  to  a  value 
beyond  his  fondest  dreams.  Much  of  it  he  has  sold,  but  he  still  retains  a  large 
part  of  his  original  claim,  most  of  which  is  in  the  very  heart  of  the  city.  He  was 
one  of  the  heaviest  losers  by  the  great  fire  of  June  6,  1889,  but  with  that  matchless 
energy  which  characterized  the  citizens  of  Seattle  after  that  catastrophe,  as  soon 
as  the  smoldering  embers  of  his  destroyed  property  would  permit  he  began  the 
erection  of  some  of  the  finest  buildings  on  the  Pacific  coast.  He  has  recently 
completed  the  Pioneer  building,  on  Pioneer  place,  which  would  be  considered  a 
magnificent  structure  even  in  the  largest  cities  of  our  country.  Upon  opposite 
corners  of  the  same  square  he  has  also  under  construction  two  other  buildings 
which  in  architectural  effect  and  richness  of  finish  will  equal  the  Pioneer  building. 
He  also  has  under  construction  a  fine  store  building  on  the  southeast  corner  of 
Occidental  Avenue  and  Yesler  Way." 

Before  he  left  his  old  home  in  Ohio  :\Ir.  Yesler  was  married  to  Sarah  Burgert, 


98  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

a  lady  who  shared  all  his  early  trials  and  struggles  and  who  is  most  kindly  remem- 
bered in  Seattle.  Two  children  were  born  to  Mrs.  Yesler,  but  they  died  at  an 
early  age,  and  in  1887  their  mother  followed  them  to  the  grave.  A  few  months 
prior  to  his  death  Mr.  Yesler  munificently  endowed  a  home  for  young  women, 
dedicated  to  the  memory  of  that  wife,  Sarah  B.  Yesler.  In  1890  Mr.  Yesler  was 
married  to  Miss  Minnie  Gagle,  a  native  of  his  old  home. 

In  every  commercial  enterprise  Henry  Yesler  took  a  leading  share.  With  his 
own  hands  he  worked  on  the  first  coal  railroad ;  he  was  a  promoter  of  the  Seattle 
&  Walla  Walla  Railroad,  of  the  first  transportation  company,  of  the  waterworks — 
of  every  movement  to  develop  the  town.  In  the  earlier  years  he  was  free  with 
his  money  in  loaning  to  those  less  fortunate  and  in  making  advances  toward  the 
promotion  of  individual  schemes  of  commercial  development. 


HON.  ARTHUR  H.  MOLL. 

Hon.  Arthur  H.  Moll,  a  hardware  merchant  of  Arlington,  is  a  native  of  Mon- 
roe county,  Wisconsin.  He  was  born  November  22,  1873,  of  the  marriage  of 
Alexander  H.  and  Fannie  (Vidal)  AIoll,  who  were  natives  of  Germany  and  Wis- 
consin respectively.  In  early  manhood  the  father  crossed  the  Atlantic  to  the  new 
world,  establishing  his  home  in  Wisconsin  in  1848  as  one  of  its  pioneer  settlers. 
There  he  became  connected  with  merchandising  and  continued  his  residence  in 
that  state  until  called  to  the  home  beyond  in  1889,  when  sixty-one  years  of  age. 
His  widow  still  survives  and  now  makes  her  home  in  the  state  of  New  York 
at  the  age  of  sixty-five  years. 

Of  their  family  of  four  children  Arthur  H.  Moll  was  the  second  in  order  of 
birth  and  during  his  youthful  days  he  attended  public  schools,  spending  two  years 
as  a  high  school  pupil  in  Tomah,  Wisconsin.  When  a  youth  of  fifteen  years  he 
was  first  employed  in  railroad  work  as  tallyman  for  the  tie  inspector  and  so  con- 
tinued for  nine  years.  He  afterward  settled  on  a  homestead  in  the  Sauk  River 
valley,  where  he  resided  for  two  years  and  on  the  expiration  of  that  period  he 
made  his  way  to  Everett,  where  he  became  actively  connected  with  the  hard- 
ware trade  in  the  employ  of  the  Agnew  Hardware  Company,  with  whom  he 
remained  for  a  number  of  years.  In  1905  he  arrived  in  Arlington  and  established 
the  A.  H.  Moll  hardware  business,  beginning  in  a  small  way  with  limited  capital. 
He  has  since  developed  the  business  to  extensive  proportions  and  now  has  one 
of  the  leading  stores  of  the  town — an  establishment  which  would  be  a  credit  to 
a  city  of  much  greater  size.  He  now  carries  a  complete  line  of  shelf  and  heavy 
hardware,  of  furniture  and  undertaking  supplies,  and  is  sole  owner  of  this  busi- 
ness. He  has  ever  recognized  the  fact  that  satisfied  patrons  are  the  best  advertise- 
ment and  in  the  conduct  of  his  trade  he  has  put  forth  every  efifort  to  please 
his  customers. 

On  the  19th  of  June,  1895.  Mr.  Moll  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Myra  B. 
Bartells,  of  Marinette  county,  Wisconsin,  her  father  being  Judge  F.  J.  Bartells. 
They  are  the  parents  of  five  children,  as  follows :  Frances,  who  was  born  at  Iron 
Mountain,  Michigan,  in  1896,  is  a  high  school  graduate  and  also  a  graduate  of  the 
University  of  Washington  and  now  the  wife  of  Henry  Murray,  of  Roy,  Wash- 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  99 

ington ;  Celeste,  who  was  born  in  Everett,  Washington,  in  1901  and  now  attends 
high  school  at  Arlington ;  Carl,  whose  birth  occurred  at  Everett  in  1903  and  who 
also  attends  the  high  school  at  Arlington;  George,  who  was  born  at  Everett  in 
1906  and  is  a  pupil  in  the  grade  school  at  Arlington ;  and  Myra  Elizabeth,  who 
was  born  at  Arlington,  Washington,  on  the  ist  of  February,  1916. 

Mr.  Moll  is  well  known  in  fraternal  circles,  belonging  to  a  number  of  the 
leading  organizations.  In  Masonry  he  has  attained  high  rank,  as  is  indicated 
by  the  fact  that  he  is  now  a  Noble  of  the  Mys,tic  Shrine.  He  also  belongs  to  the 
Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  the  Fraternal  Order  of  Eagles,  the  Knights 
of  Pythias,  the  Woodmen  of  the  World  and  the  Yeomen.  His  religious  faith  is 
indicated  by  his  membership  in  the  Christian  Science  church.  In  politics  he  is  a 
progressive  republican  and  in  19 12  was  elected  to  the  state  legislature,  serving 
two  terms.  He  gave  careful  consideration  to  all  the  questions  which  came  up  for 
settlement  and  his  support  of  any  measure  indicated  his  strong  belief  in  its  worth 
as  a  factor  in  good  government.  He  was  equally  strong  in  his  opposition  to  any 
measure  which  he  believed  would  prove  inimical  to  the  best  interests  of  the  com- 
(monwealth.  He  is  also  efficient  in  his  support  of  measures  for  the  upbuilding 
of  his  home  locality  and  in  fact  is  a  recognized  leader  of  public  thought  and  action 
there. 


CHARLES  F.  ELWELL. 


Charles  F.  Elwell,  president  of  the  Monroe  National  Bank  at  Monroe,  was 
born  April  2,  1862,  in  Northfield,  Maine.  His  father,  John  Elwell,  was  a  native 
of  that  state,  while  his  ancestors  belonged  to  the  old  York  colony  that  came  from 
England  at  a  very  early  period  in  the  settlement  of  the  new  world.  John  Elwell, 
the  founder  of  the  American  branch  of  the  family,  participated  in  the  Revolution- 
ary war.  John  Elwell,  father  of  Charles  F.  Elwell,  was  a  successful  lumberman 
and  became  a  pioneer  settler  of  Port  Gamble,  Washington,  arriving  in  1858. 
He  afterward  returned  to  Maine,  where  he  resided  until  1872,  when  he  again 
made  his  way  to  the  Pacific  northwest,  settling  in  Snohomish  county.  Along  the 
banks  of  the  Snohomish  river  he  engaged  in  the  lumber  business  with  ox  teams 
and  was  among  the  pioneers  in  the  development  of  the  lumber  trade  in  that  section 
In  politics  he  was  a  stanch  republican  and  his  religious  faith  was  that  of  the 
Presbyterian  church.  He  was  ever  loyal  to  any  cause  which  he  espoused  and  his 
many  sterling  traits  of  character  won  him  high  regard.  He  passed  away  in 
Snohomish  in  1887,  at  the  age  of  fifty-nine  years,  while  his  wife  died  in  1878, 
at  the  age  of  fifty-four.  She  bore  the  maiden  name  of  Eliza  Crosby  and  was  born 
in  Maine,  coming,  however,  of  English  ancestry.  By  her  marriage  she  had  seven 
sons  and  four  daughters. 

Charles  F.  Elwell,  the  youngest  of  the  sons,  pursued  his  education  in  the 
public  schools  of  Snohomish  and  of  Seattle,  supplemented  by  a  two  years'  course 
in  the  University  of  Washington.  On  attaining  his  majority  he  made  his 
initial  step  in  the  business  world  as  assistant  to  his  father,  then  a  well  known 
lumberman,  and  upon  his  father's  death  he  inherited  his  holdings.  Not  long 
afterward  he  turned  his  attention  to  stock  raising  and  began  the  sale  of  thorough- 


100  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

bred  cattle,  in  addition  to  which  he  carried  on  general  farming,  being  thus  identi- 
fied with  farming  and  stock  raising  interests  in  Snohomish  county  for  eleven  years. 
He  also  became  an  active  factor  in  commercial  circles  as  a  wholesale  and  retail 
dealer  in  meats  and  in  that  line  he  has  since  actively  and  successfully  continued. 
He  is  likewise  president  of  the  Monroe  National  Bank,  having  been  called  to  that 
office  of  trust  and  responsibility  in  1910.  His  fellow  townsmen  regard  him  as  a 
most  reliable,  enterprising  and  progressive  business  man  and  one  whose  efforts 
are  productive  of  beneficial  and  far-reaching  results. 

In  Snohomish,  on  the  26th  of  March,  1889,  Mr.  Elwell  was  married  to  Miss 
Sophie  Roessel,  a  native  of  Minnesota  and  a  daughter  of  George  N.  and  Louise 
(Schattner)  Roessel,  both  now  deceased.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Elwell  had  four  chil- 
dren, as  follows :  June  A.,  who  was  born  at  Snoqualmie,  Washington,  June  13, 
1891 ;  Blanche,  whose  birth  occurred  in  Snohomish  on  the  21st  of  January,  1894, 
and  who  passed  away  September  2,  1897;  Earl  M.,  born  in  Snohomish,  Septem- 
ber 4,  1895 ;  and  Celest,  who  was  born  in  Monroe  on  the  29th  of  July,  1902. 

In  politics  Mr.  Elwell  is  a  republican.  He  has  served  as  a  member  of  the 
city  council  for  many  terms,  remaining  in  that  office  from  the  organization  of 
the  city  until  1915.  He  has  ever  taken  a  deep  and  helpful  interest  in  affairs 
relating  to  the  upbuilding  of  his  town  and  is  an  active  member  of  the  Monroe 
Commercial  Club.  He  belongs  to  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  to  the  Benevolent 
Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  his  religious  faith  is  that  of  the  Congregational 
church.  His  has  been  an  upright  and  honorable  life  actuated  by  high  pur- 
poses and  fraught  with  good  results,  and  the  respect  and  high  regard  entertained 
for  him  are  well  merited. 


WILLIAM  COLUMBUS  COX,  M.  D. 

Dr.  William  Columbus  Cox,  who  has  won  unusual  success  in  the  general 
practice  of  medicine  at  Everett,  was  born  on  the  20th  of  September,  1858,  in 
Flinty  Branch,  Mitchell  county,  North  Carolina,  the  eldest  son  and  second  child 
of  Samuel  W.  and  Cynthia  (Blalock)  Cox.  The  Cox  family  is  of  English  and 
German  lineage  but  of  old  American  colonial  stock.  The  father  of  Dr.  Cox 
was  also  born  in  North  Carolina  and  became  a  farmer.  In  the  year  1873  ^^^ 
left  the  Atlantic  coast  to  seek  a  home  in  the  far  west  and  in  that  year  arrived 
in  Walla  Walla,  Washington,  where  he  remained  for  two  decades,  being  one 
of  the  pioneer  settlers  of  that  section.  He  passed  away  in  1893,  at  the  age  of 
sixty-six  years,  his  birth  having  occurred  August  2,  1827.  His  wife  was  also 
a  native  of  Mitchell  county,  North  Carolina,  born  December  31,  1837,  and  was  a 
daughter  of  a  southern  farmer  and  planter  who  belonged  to  an  old  American 
family  and  was  of  German  and  English  descent.  Mrs.  Cox  was  a  sister  of  Dr. 
N.  G.  Blalock,  who  for  many  years  has  been  a  distinguished  physician  of  the 
northwest.  Mrs.  Cox  passed  away  in  her  native  state  in  1867,  when  but  twenty- 
nine  years  of  age.  She  was  the  mother  of  four  daughters  and  two  sons,  as  fol- 
lows: Addie,  who  is  the  wife  of  George  Rasmus,  a  resident  of  Walla  Walla, 
Washington;  William  Columbus,  of  this  review;  Hulda,  who  is  the  wife  of  S.  S. 
Parris  and  resides  near  Athena,  Oregon ;  Xelson  D.,  of  Walla  Walla,  Washing- 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  101 

ton ;  Ura,  the  wife  of  Dr.  J.  P.  Price,  of  Nez  Perce,  Idaho;  and  Victa,  the  wife  of 
Thomas  Yoe,  of  Seattle,  Washington. 

When  a  youth  of  fifteen  years  Dr.  Cox  accompanied  his  father  to  Walla 
Walla  and  in  that  city  continued  his  education  as  a  public  school  pupil  to  the 
age  of  nineteen  years,  after  which  he  worked  on  his  uncle's  farm  until  1882. 
In  the  fall  of  that  year,  having  determined  upon  his  future  course,  he  matriculated 
in  the  Jefl:'erson  Medical  College  at  Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania,  which  was  the 
alma  mater  of  his  distinguished  uncle,  and  from  that  institution  he  was  gradu- 
ated on  the  completion  of  a  thorough  course  April  2,  1885,  receiving  the  degree 
of  M.  D.  Thus  equipped  for  his  chosen  profession,  he  returned  to  Walla  Walla, 
where  he  engaged  in  the  practice  of  medicine  with  Dr.  Blalock,  a  relation  that 
was  maintained  until  April,  1886,  at  which  time  Dr.  Cox  removed  to  Genesee, 
Idaho.  There  he  remained  in  active  practice  for  five  years  and  on  the  6th  of 
July,  1 89 1,  he  came  to  Everett,  being  the  first  physician  on  the  then  new  town 
site.  Within  a  few  hours  after  his  arrival  he  was  called  upon  to  perform  a 
minor  surgical  operation  for  one  of  the  town  site  laborers  who  met  with  an  ac- 
cident. Since  that  time  he  has  been  continuously  active  in  his  profession  and 
most  successful  in  his  practice.  At  the  time  of  his  arrival  here  there  was  in 
reality  no  city  or  even  a  town,  merely  a  collection  of  people  awaiting  the  final 
survey  and  platting  of  the  land,  knowing  that  a  commercial  center  was  projected 
by  aggressive  capitalists.  It  was  not  until  September,  1891,  that  the  first  plat 
was  thrown  open  for  sale  by  W.  G.  Swalwell,  but  that  event  inaugurated  a  boom 
with  all  the  intensity  common  to  such  occurrences.  Dr.  Cox  came  early,  worked 
hard,  demonstrated  his  skill  and  as  a  result  has  won  unusual  success.  Beside 
giving  his  attention  to  a  large  general  practice  he  served  as  the  local  surgeon 
for  the  Great  Northern  Railroad  Company  for  fourteen  years  and  is  now  sur- 
geon for  the  Northern  Pacific  Railroad  Company  and  the  Everett  Railway,  Light 
and  Power  Company. 

Dr.  Cox  has  been  married  twice.  On  the  4th  of  March,  1888,  he  wedded 
Miss  Grace  Jain,  a  native  of  Wisconsin  and  a  daughter  of  Louis  and  Adelia 
Jain,  of  Genesee,  Idaho.  She  passed  away  on  the  lOth  of  October,  1891,  after 
a  happy  married  life  of  a  little  more  than  three  years.  On  the  ist  of  Novem- 
ber, 1894,  the  doctor  was  again  married,  his  second  union  being  with  Harriett  G. 
McFarland,  a  native  of  Maine  and  the  daughter  of  Captain  Robert  and  Georgia 
Berry  (Harrington)  McFarland,  who  were  also  natives  of  the  Pine  Tree  state  and 
among  Everett's  earliest  pioneers.  Captain  McFarland  spent  all  of  his  life 
as  a  sea-faring  man  on  both  the  Atlantic  and  Pacific  coasts  and  served  in  many 
prominent  government  positions  of  trust  and  high  responsibility  at  home  and 
abroad.  In  his  demise,  which  occurred  April  2^],  1914,  Everett  lost  one  of  its 
distinguished  citizens.  During  the  Civil  war  he  commanded  vessels  engaged 
in  furnishing  supplies  to  the  Union  army  and  navy  and  narrowly  escaped 
capture  or  death  many  times. 

Ever  recognized  as  a  leader,  Dr.  Cox  has  been  elected  to  various  posi- 
tions of  public  trust  and  has  always  been  found  most  loyal  to  his  duty  and  the 
confidence  reposed  in  him.  In  1890  he  was  chosen  mayor  of  Genesee,  Idaho, 
serving  for  a  year,  and  in  1894  he  was  elected  a  member  of  the  Everett  city 
council.  The  following  year  he  was  nominated  and  elected  mayor  and  served 
through  the  succeeding  year.     In  1900  he  was  appointed  a  member  of  the  state 


102  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

board  of  medical  examiners  and  acted  in  that  position  for  three  years.  His 
poHtical  support  has  always  been  given  the  democratic  party  and  fraternally  he 
is  connected  with  the  Masons,  Knights  of  Pythias,  Improved  Order  of  Red 
Men,  Benevolent  Order  of  Elks  and  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows.  He 
also  holds  membership  with  various  social  organizations,  including  the  Everett 
Commercial  Club,  of  which  he  served  as  president  in  19 15,  the  Everett  Golf  and 
Country  Club  and  the  Cascade  Club  of  Everett.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Snohomish 
County  Medical  Association  and  the  State  Medical  Society,  of  which  he  was 
president  in  1912  and  1913.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  American  Medical 
Association,  and  the  American  Association  of  Railway  Surgeons  and  is  a  fel- 
low of  the  American  College  of  Surgeons.  His  genial,  unfailing  courtesy  and 
broad  sympathy  have  won  for  him  a  goodly  host  of  friends  and  admirers  and 
in  a  profession  where  merit  alone  is  recognized  as  a  just  cause  for  advancement 
he  has  attained  a  most  worthy  and  honorable  place.  Professionally  and  socially 
he  stands  today  as  one  of  the  leading  citizens  of  Everett  and  the  Puget  Sound 
country.  His  home,  built  in  1898  at  No.  2732  Colby  street,  is  one  of  Everett's 
most  attractive  residences,  and  hospitality  and  good  cheer  have  made  it  through 
all  these  years  one  of  the  social  centers  of  the  city. 


CHARLES  L.  LEWIS. 


Twenty-six  years  have  been  added  to  the  cycle  of  the  centuries  since  Charles 
L.  Lewis  of  Raymond  established  his  home  in  the  northwest,  arriving  at  Aber- 
deen, Washington,  on  the  nth  of  January,  1891.  He  had  come  to  the  Pacific 
coast  from  Michigan,  his  native  state,  his  birth  having  occurred  near  Marshall, 
Calhoun  county,  October  2,  1855,  his  parents  being  Daniel  and  Martha  Lewis. 
He  resided  continuously  in  that  state  until  1891  and  after  acquiring  his  education 
in  its  public  schools  he  engaged  in  mercantile  pursuits  and  in  the  shingle  business 
at  McBrides,  Montcalm  county,  until  1890.  He  then  removed  to  Battle  Creek  and 
thence  came  to  the  state  of  Washington,  arriving  at  Aberdeen  on  the  nth  of 
January,  1891.  He  resided  in  Aberdeen  for  thirteen  years,  during  which  time  he 
was  engaged  in  the  manufacture  of  shingles,  operating  several  shingle  mills  in 
that  locality.  In  1904  he  removed  to  Olympia,  where  he  continued  to  make  his 
home  for  eleven  years  and  then  took  up  his  abode  in  Raymond,  where  he  now 
resides.  In  November,  1905,  he  began  the  erection  of  the  buildings  and  mill  for 
the  Raymond  Lumber  Company  and  in  August,  1906,  the  operation  of  the  mill 
was  begun  with  E.  Hulbert,  of  Aberdeen,  as  president  of  the  company,  E.  A. 
Christenson,  of  San  Francisco,  as  vice  president,  and  Charles  L.  Lewis,  secretary, 
treasurer  and  manager..  There  has  since  been  no  change  in  the  personnel  of  the 
company,  pleasant  relations  being  maintained  throughout  all  of  this  period  by 
the  officers,  whose  hearty  cooperation  has  brought  substantial  results.  The  mill 
has  a  capacity  of  one  hundred  and  fifty  thousand  feet  and  employment  is  fur- 
nished to  one  hundred  and  thirty-five  men.  They  manufacture  lumber  exclusively 
and  the  equipment  of  the  mill  is  thoroughly  modern  in  every  way.  They  also  have 
their  own  logging  camps  on  Green  creek  and  at  Burt,  Washington,  where  they 
employ  one  hundred  and  twenty  men.  Mr.  Lewis  has  always  been  in  charge  of 
the  mill,  which  is  one  of  the  best  in  Pacific  county,  and  there  are  few  phases  of 


CHARLES  L.  LEWIS 


,   THE  NEW   YORK 
PUBLIC  LIBRARY 

ASTOH,    LENOX 
TILDEN   FOUNDATION 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  105 

the  lumber  business  with  which  he  is  not  faniihar.  His  judgment  is  sound,  his 
discrimination  keen  and  his  enterprise  unfaltering  and  his  salient  qualities  have 
led  to  the  attainment  of  very  desirable  success. 

In  Michigan,  in  1876,  Mr.  Lewis  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Kate  A.  Tew, 
a  daughter  of  Thomas  S.  and  Adelia  W.  Tew,  of  Stanton,  Michigan.  Twelve 
children  have  been  born  of  this  marriage,  ten  of  whom  are  yet  living:  Nina, 
Essie,  Myrtle,  Thomas,  Edith,  Fred,  Grace,  Ethel,  Raymond  and  Flelen.  Those 
who  have  passed  away  are:  Edna,  who  died  at  the  age  of  seventeen  years; 
and  Lorna,  at  the  age  of  twenty-two.  Of  this  family  Thomas  is  married  and 
now  resides  at  South  Bend,  Washington,  while  Fred  is  also  married  and  resides 
in  southern  California,  Myrtle  lives  at  Olympia,  and  Edith  is  the  wife  of  Frank 
Hayes,  of  Seattle.     The  other  living  children  are  all  at  home. 

Mr.  Lewis  is  well  known  in  fraternal  circles,  being  identitied  with  several 
orders,  including  the  Masons,  the  Elks,  the  Woodmen  of  the  World  and  the 
Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen.  His  life  has  been  one  of  intense  and  well 
directed  activity.  Lie  has  had  few  leisure  moments  and  the  enterprise  and  deter- 
mination which  he  has  displayed  have  enabled  him  to  wrest  fortune  from  the 
hands  of  fate.  He  has  always  placed  his  dependence  upon  the  substantial  qualities 
of  industry  and  perseverance  and  he  has  ne\er  stoj)pc(l  short  of  the  successful 
attainment  of  his  purpose. 


Gl^ORGF.  KINNEAR. 


As  long  as  Seattle  stands,  the  name  of  Kinnear  will  be  an  honored  one  in 
the  city.  It  is  perpetuated  in  Kinnear  Park  and  in  other  public  projects  which 
owe  their  existence  to  his  efforts  and  are  the  result  of  his  sagacity  and  his  public 
spirit.  Dealing  in  real  estate,  he  became  one  of  the  capitalists  of  Seattle  and 
contributed  in  most  substantial  measure  to  its  uplniilding  and  development.  A 
native  of  Ohio,  he  was  born  in  I'ickaway  county  in  iS^^d  and  was  taken  by  his 
parents  to  Tippecanoe  county,  Indiana,  the  family  home  being  established  on  the 
banks  of  the  Wabash,  the  father  there  building  the  first  log  cabin  at  La  Fayette. 
He  was  three  years  of  age  when  his  father  purchased  land  on  Flint  creek  and 
there  erected  a  brick  dwelling  from  brick  which  he  made  on  his  land,  while  the 
floors,  laths,  doors,  window  frames  and  casings  were  of  black  waliutt.  George 
Kinnear  had  reached  the  age  of  nine  years  when  the  father  started  with  his  family 
for  Woodford  county,  Illinois,  taking  with  liini  his  flocks  and  herds.  They  had 
advanced  but  one  hundred  yards,  however,  when  one  of  the  wagons  broke  and 
little  nine-year-old,  barefooted  George  ran  l)ack  to  ihe  house  and  cut  a  notch 
in  the  window  sill.  Sixty-four  years  later  he  rapped  at  the  door  of  this  same 
house.  An  old  lady  appeared,  to  whom  he  related  that  the  place  was  his  former 
home.  She  said  that  must  be  impossible,  for  she  had  lived  there  sixty-four 
years,  that  .she  was  there  when  the  former  owner,  Charles  Kitmear,  and  family 
left  with  their  teams  for  Illinois,  that  .shortly  after  the  starl;  a  little  boy  came 
running  back,  went  into  the  next  room— Mr.  Kiimear  interrupted— "Let  me.  un- 
accompanied, go  into  the  next  room  and  see  what  that  little  boy  did."  He  went 
straight  lo  his  window  sill  and  there,  intact,  was  the  notch.  For  a  few  seconds 
he  was  again  a  barefooted,  nine-year-old  boy  making  that  notch.     It  was  his  last 


Vol.   II— 8 


106  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

act  of  affection  for  the  Indiana  home  after  the  rest  of  the  family  had  gone  from 
the  house  perhaps  forever. 

George  Kinnear  spent  the  time  in  the  usual  manner  of  farm  lads  at  the  old 
home  on  Walnut  creek,  in  Woodford  county,  until  the  outbreak  of  the  war, 
Vears  afterward  there  was  to  be  a  home  coming  in  Woodford  county  and  Mr. 
Kinnear  in  response  to  an  invitation  to  be  present  on  that  occasion,  wrote  that  he 
regretfully  declined  the  invitation  but  gave  an  account  of  his  experiences  and 
recollections  of  the  early  times  in  that  locality.     From  this  we  quote,  not  only 
because  it  gives  an  excellent  picture  of  the  life  lived  there  in  that  day  but  also 
because  it  gives  a  splendid  idea  of  the  literary  talent  of  the  man  who  in  the  inter- 
vening years  had  advanced  from  poverty  to  affluence  and  had  become  a  prominent 
figure  in  the  community  in  which  he  lived.     He  said:     "In  the  year  1851  when 
I  was  a  boy,  we  settled  in  Walnut  Grove.    Then  and  for  several  years  thereafter 
our  postoffice  was  at  Washington  and  there  is  where  we  did  most  of  our  trading. 
Near  by  where  we  built  our  house  was  the  old  camp  ground  of  the  Pottawottomies. 
Their  camp  ground  was  strewn  with  pieces  of  flint  and  arrow  heads  and  their 
old  trails  leading  off  in  different  directions  remained.     Often  in  my  quiet  strolls 
through  the  woods  in  my  imagination  I  peopled  the  forest  again  with  Indians 
and  almost  wished  I  were  one.     Most  of  the  country  between  Walnut  Grove  and 
Washington  was  wet,  with  many  ponds  and  sloughs.     The  road  was  anywhere 
we  saw  fit  to  drive  (always  aiming,  however,  to  keep  on  the  top  of  the  sod.)     In 
driving  across  sloughs,  we  would  drive  at  a  run  for  fear  of  going  through,  but  if 
we  got  into  a  rut  or  the  sod  broke,  we  were  stuck.     During  the  summer  time  I 
went  to  Washington  twice  a  week  to  have  the  prairie  plows  sharpened  and  while 
the  work  was  being  done  I  would  stroll  about  and  peer  into  the  little  stores  and 
shops,  which  were  interesting  to  the  boy  raised  on  a  farm  and  not  used  to  town 
life.     I  remember  one  day  seeing  at  Washington  a  bunch  of  little  girls  wading 
about  barefoot  in  the  mud  like  a  lot  of  little  ducks.    One  of  them  was  little  five- 
year-old  Angie  Simmons.     When  I  was  seventeen  years  old,  I  went  to  work  in 
A.  H.  Danforth's  store,  where  I  remained  about  four  months,  beginning  at  the 
bottom,   sweeping,  moving  boxes,  etc.,   occasionally   selling  goods.      I   observed 
then  how  mean  some  men  could  be.     When  I  was  at  work  and  nobody  else 
around,  several  of  the  men  would  say,  'They  make  you  sweep.     They  make  you 
do  the  dirty  work.     I  wouldn't  stand  it,'  but  I  had  sense  enough  to  know  my 
place.     I  did  not  like  store  keeping  and  remained  only  four  months. 

"In  1865  the  war  was  over  and  I  was  at  home  and  out  of  business.  I  bought 
a  brand  new  buggy  and  a  nice  team.  I  started  out  on  the  morning  of  the  Fourth 
of  July  to  see  what  I  might.  My  father,  I  suppose,  to  plague  me,  said,  'Yes,  you 
will  marry  the  first  girl  you  get  into  that  buggy.'  I  struck  out  straight  for  Wash- 
ington, tied  up  my  team  and  walked  over  to  where  the  speaking  would  be  held. 
Meeting  my  old  friend,  Diego  Ross,  he  at  once  introduced  me  to  a  handsome 
girl.  I  proffered  to  find  her  a  seat,  which  she  accepted.  Considering  the  cir- 
cumstances of  our  new  acquaintance  with  each  other  and  the  courtesies  due  from 
one  to  the  other,  we  paid  reasonably  good  attention  to  the  reading  of  the  Declara- 
tion of  Independence  and  the  oration,  and  at  the  conclusion  of  the  same  I  drove 
with  her  in  my  buggy  to  her  home  and  there  engaged  her  company  for  that  even- 
ing to  view  the  fireworks.     (First  girl  in  buggy.) 

"The  Washington  people  had  a  great  celebration.     The  old  anvil  roared  and 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  107 

stirred  up  great  enthusiasm  and  the  fireworks  were  brilliant.  My  girl  and  I  were 
seated  in  the  buggy  watching  the  fireworks  and  some  girls  were  walking  by  in 
the  weeds.  I  heard  my  girl  say,  'Sally,  is  the  dog  fennel  wet?'  Was  that  a  joke 
or  sarcasm?  The  question  was  asked,  'Where  will  we  be  the  next  Fourth?' 
The  answer  was,  'Why  not  here?'  Now  we  made  an  appointment  one  year 
ahead.  An  appointment  one  year  ahead  seemed  a  long  way  oft',  so  I  called  oc- 
casionally to  see  if  she  and  I  were  still  on  good  terms  or  if  she  had  gone  off  with 
another  fellow.  The  next  Fourth  came  around  and  we  were  there  in  the  buggy 
watching  the  fireworks.  (First  girl  still  in  the  buggy.)  One  time  I  called  about 
noon.  She  met  me  at  the  door  with  her  sleeves  rolled  up.  She  asked  me  if  I 
would  stay  for  dinner  and  I  said  'Yes.'  She  was  beaten  for  once.  She  thought 
I  would  know  enough  to  say  'No.'  I  was  ahead  one  meal.  By  this  time  we 
were  getting  enthusiastic  on  the  Fourth  of  July  and  set  another  date  a  year  ahead. 
But  we  began  negotiations  now  in  earnest  and  on  March  28,  1867,  we  were  mar- 
ried. (First  girl  in  buggy.)  It  was  hard  to  beat  old  father,  at  a  guess.  The 
first  girl  in  buggy  took  the  buggy  and  from  that  time  on  ruled  the  roost.  The 
first  girl  in  buggy  and  the  little  five-year-old  Angie  Simmons  were  one  and  the 
same. 

"But  take  me  back,  take  me  back  to  the  times  when  Nature  was  clothed  in  her 
natural  garments;  when  the  log  cabin  was  the  only  dwelling  place  of  the  settler; 
when  rough  logs  chinked  with  mud  and  sticks,  a  rough  stone  chimney,  a  puncheon 
floor,  a  clapboard  roof,  the  latch  string  hanging  out  were  both  hut  and  palace. 
In  those  times  the  forest  trees,  untouched  by  the  woodman's  axe,  stood  in  all 
their  native  beauty.  The  woods  were  full  of  wild  fruit — the  wild  cherries,  wild 
plums,  crabapples,  mulberries,  hackberries,  elderberries,  gooseberries,  black  cur- 
rants, wild  grapes  and  May  apples,  red  haws,  black  haws,  acorns,  chinkapins, 
hickory  nuts  and  walnuts,  pawpaws  and  persimmons  and  wild  honey  in  nearly 
every  hollow  tree.  Of  the  game  birds  there  were  droves  of  wild  turkeys,  pheas- 
ants, quail,  doves,  woodpeckers,  yellow  hammers,  plovers  and  sap  suckers.  Of 
the  animals,  the  deer,  squirrel,  coon,  'possum,  rabbit,  wolf  and  fox.  The  streams 
teemed  with  fish. 

"I  looked  up  into  the  sky  and  saw  the  myriads  upon  myriads  of  wild  pigeons. 
They  were  in  columns  extending  from  horizon  to  horizon  and  to  the  north  and 
south  as  far  as  eye  could  see ;  at  times  they  almost  darkened  the  sun,  and  out  on 
the  prairie  I  saw  millions  of  wild  geese,  ducks,  brants  and  cranes  sporting  about 
the  sloughs  and  ponds,  their  quacking,  screaming,  chirping  and  whirring  of  wings 
sounding  like  distant  thunder.  Out  in  another  direction  on  the  dry  ground  I  saw 
the  prairie  chickens.  They  were  almost  as  numerous  as  the  water  fowl.  They 
were  crowing  and  cackling  and  chasing  each  other  around  in  the  grass.  Among 
the  birds  or  off  by  themselves  were  herds  of  deer  feeding  on  the  prairie  grass. 

"Here  was  the  sportsman's  paradise.  He  would  never  consent  to  be  trans- 
ported with  joy  to  another  land.  From  his  flocks  and  herds  he  would  supply 
the  table  with  the  choicest  venison,  geese,  ducks  and  prairie  hens  to  suit  the  guests 
at  the  sumptuous  feast.  This  was  the  joyful  place  for  the  rugged,  barefoot  boy, 
bareheaded,  on  a  bareback  horse,  with  a  gun  and  a  dog  by  his  side.  With  what 
joy,  after  following  the  deer  across  the  plain,  would  he  carry  home  to  his  mother 
the  trophy  of  the  chase!  This  was  the  place  for  the  rosy-cheeked  girl,  clad 
in  her  linsey  dress,  in  a  bewildering  mass  of  wild  flowers,  trailing  vines  and 


108  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

rustling  leaves,  as  happy  as  the  feathered  songsters  that  surrounded  her  and 
sang  with  her  their  dehght  at  the  beautiful  scene.  What  a  treat  it  would  be  now 
to  go  back  with  our  baskets  into  those  woods  and  gather  the  nuts  as  they  fall 
from  the  trees,  to  pull  down  the  black  haw  bush  and  gather  the  richest  berry 
that  grows,  and  the  sweet  persimmons  we'd  gather,  too.  Farther  down  the  wood 
lies  the  pawpaw  patch,  and  from  among  its  leaves  we'd  pick  the  ripe,  juicy 
fruit  and  at  last  start  for  home,  our  baskets  filled  to  the  brim.  Let  us  go  home, 
to  our  old  home  again.  We  see  the  large  fireplace,  the  wide  hearth,  the  old 
Dutch  oven  in  which  mother  baked  her  bread  and  boiled  the  mush  before  the 
fire.  The  table  is  spread  with  the  bread  mother  baked,  the  bowls  of  mush  and 
milk,  the  roasted  game  the  hunter  brought,  the  baked  potatoes  and  luscious  fruit 
and  the  pumpkin  pie  mother  made  from  the  flat  pie  pumpkin.  A  barefoot  boy 
is  squatting  on  the  floor  and  with  the  mush  pot  between  his  legs  is  scraping  the 
kettle  for  the  crust.  Out  in  the  woods  we  hear  the  wild  turkey  gobble ;  the  drum- 
ming of  the  pheasant  and  the  nuts  dropping  from  the  trees ;  we  see  the  waving 
of  the  treetops  and  hear  the.  rustling  of  the  leaves,  the  song  of  the  birds  and  the 
barking  of  the  squirrels  and  watch  them  leap  from  tree  to  tree.  They  are  all  our 
friends.  How  I  like  them !  Let  me  go  among  them  alone  at  night  with  my  dog 
and  there  Fll  follow  the  'possum  and  the  coon,  stroll  along  the  silent  creek  and 
listen  to  the  songs  of  the  frogs,  the  hooting  of  the  owl  and  the  whippoorwill.  This 
is  August  31,  191 1.  How  pleasant  now  to  remember  old  Washington  surrounded 
by  broad  prairies  and  beautiful  groves  and  inhabited  by  friends  and  associates 
of  the  early  days !  Here  from  the  Shore  of  the  Great  Pacific,  the  Land  of  the 
Salmon  and  the  Big  Red  Apple,  to  you  of  the  Land  of  the  Rustling  Corn  we  send 
Greeting !" 

In  the  letter  from  which  the  above  quotation  was  taken  Mr.  Kinnear  referred 
to  his  military  service.  With  the  outbreak  of  the  Civil  war  he  joined  the  Forty- 
seventh  Illinois  Regiment,  with  which  he  remained  until  mustered  out  in  1864. 
On  his  way  home  while  crossing  the  Mississippi  he  said,  'T  have  chewed  tobacco 
for  eleven  years.  This  is  no  habit  for  a  young  man  to  start  out  in  life  with," 
and  threw  into  the  water  a  silver  pocket  case  full  of  tobacco.  That  was  character- 
istic of  Mr.  Kinnear.  If  once  he  decided  that  a  course  was  wrong  or  unwise 
he  did  not  hesitate  to  turn  aside,  for  he  never  deviated  from  a  path  which  he 
believed  to  be  right.  It  was  this  fidelity  to  all  that  he  thought  to  be  worth  while 
in  the  development  of  character  that  made  him  the  splendid  specimen  of  man- 
hood, remembered  by  his  many  friends  in  Seattle. 

Following  his  return  from  the  war  his  mother  handed  him  thirty-six  hundred 
dollars — his  pay,  which  he  had  sent  her  while  at  the  front  to  help  her  in  the 
conduct  of  household  aft'airs.  With  the  mother's  sacrifice  and  devotion,  however, 
she  had  saved  it  all  for  him  and  with  that  amount  he  invested  in  a  herd  of  cattle 
which  he  fed  through  the  winter  and  sold  at  an  advance  the  following  spring, 
using  the  proceeds  in  the  purchase  of  two  sections  of  Illinois  land.  He  not  only 
became  identified  with  farming  interests  but  from  1864  until  1869  held  the  office 
of  county  clerk  of  Woodford  county.  Illinois,  proving  a  most  capable  and  trust- 
worthy official  in  that  position.  On  retiring  from  the  office  he  concentrated  his 
energies  upon  the  development  and  cultivation  of  his  land  and  while  carrying  on 
farming  he  would  purchase  com  in  the  fall  and  place  it  in  cribs,  selling  when 
the  market  reached,  as  he  believed,  its  best  point.    In  the  meantime  he  studied  con- 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 


109 


ditions  in  the  developing  northwest.  His  attention  was  first  called  to  the  Puget 
Sound  country  in  1864  and  thereafter  from  time  to  time  his  mind  returned  to  that 
district.  Knowing  that  the  waters  of  the  Sound  were  navigable  he  believed 
that  one  day  a  great  city  would  be  built  there  and  after  ten  years,  in  which  he 
pondered  the  question,  he  made  a  trip  to  the  northwest  in  1874,  looking  over  the 
different  locations.  He  was  most  favorably  impressed  with  the  site  of  Seattle 
and  before  he  returned  to  Illinois  he  purchased  what  is  known  as  the  G.  Kinnear 
addition  on  the  south  side  of  Queen  Anne  Hill.  He  then  returned  home  and  four 
years  later,  or  in  1878,  he  brought  his  family  to  the  northwest.  He  felt  that 
investment  in  property  here  would  be  of  immense  advantage  and  as  fast  as  he 
could  sell  his  Illinois  land  at  fifty  dollars  per  acre  he  converted  the  proceeds 
into  Seattle  real  estate,  much  of  which  rose  rapidly  in  value.  There  was  but 
a  tiny  town  here  at  the  time  of  his  arrival  and  from  the  beginning  of  his  resi- 
dence on  the  Sound  he  did  everything  in  his  power  to  make  known  to  the  country 
the  possibilities  and  opportunities  of  the  northwest  and  to  aid  in  the  development 
of  the  city  in  which  he  had  located.  He  favored  and  fostered  every  measure 
which  he  believed  would  prove  of  benefit  to  the  town  and  country.  In  1878-9 
he  labored  strenuously  to  secure  the  building  of  a  wagon  road  over  the  Snoqualmie 
Pass  and  as  the  organizer  of  the  board  of  immigration  he  had  several  thousand 
pamphlets  printed,  sent  advertisements  to  the  newspapers  throughout  the  country 
and  as  the  result  of  this  widespread  publicity  letters  requesting  pamphlets  arrived 
at  the  rate  of  one  hundred  or  more  per  day  and  for  several  years  after  the  printed 
supply  had  been  exhausted  the  requests  kept  coming  in.  Just  how  far  his  efforts 
and  influence  extended  in  the  upbuilding  of  the  northwest  it  is  impossible  to 
determine  but  it  is  a  recognized  fact  that  Mr.  Kinnear's  work  in  behalf  of  Seattle 
has  been  far-reaching  and  most  beneficial. 

In  1886,  at  the  time  of  the  Chinese  riots,  he  was  captain  of  the  Home  Guard 
and  in  that  connection  did  important  service.  The  anti-Chinese  feeling  in  the 
northwest  found  expression  in  action  in  the  fall  of  1885,  when  the  Chinese  were 
expelled  from  a  number  of  towns  along  the  coast  by  mobs  and  an  Anti-Chinese 
Congress  was  held  in  Seattle  which  promulgated  a  manifesto  that  all  Chinese 
must  leave  the  localities  represented  in  the  congress  on  or  prior  to  the  first  day 
of  November.  The  authorities  in  Seattle  prepared  to  resist  the  lawless  element 
and  the  ist  of  November  came  without  the  Chinese  having  been  driven  out  of 
Seattle.  On  the  3d  of  November  the  Chinese  were  expelled  from  Tacoma  and 
the  spirit  of  hatred  against  the  Mongolians  grew  in  intensity  along  the  coast. 
As  the  weeks  passed  the  leaders  of  the  anti-Chinese  forces  continued  their  activity 
and  it  became  increasingly  evident  that  there  was  serious  trouble  ahead.  One 
morning  ten  or  a  dozen  men  met  in  Seattle,  among  them  Mr.  Kinnear,  and 
he  proposed  that  a  force  of  citizens  be  organized  and  armed  for  the  purpose  of 
holding  the  mob  element  in  check.  All  present  agreed  and  subsequently  a  com- 
pany of  eighty  men  armed  with  breech-loading  guns  was  organized  and  given 
the  name  of  the  Home  Guards.  Mr.  Kinnear  was  made  captain  of  this  organi- 
zation and  arrangements  were  made  for  signals  to  be  given  to  indicate  that  the 
mob  had  actually  begun  the  attack.  As  several  inaccurate  accounts  of  the  riot 
have  appeared.  Captain  Kinnear  published  a  small  book  giving  a  correct  account 
of  the  whole  anti-Chinese  trouble  and  from  this  the  following  quotation  is 
taken : 


no  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

"On  Sunday  morning  (Feb.  7th),  about  eleven  o'clock,  the  old  University  and 
Methodist  Episcopal  Church  bells  sounded  the  signals.  At  a  meeting  the  previous 
evening  a  committee  had  been  appointed  to  take  charge  of  the  removal  of  the 
Chinese.  They  proceeded  to  the  Chinese  quarters  with  wagons,  ordered  the 
Orientals  to  pack  up,  then,  with  the  aid  of  the  rioters,  placed  them  and  their 
baggage  onto  wagons  and  drove  them  to  the  dock  at  the  foot  of  Main  Street,  the 
intention  being  to  load  them  onto  the  Steamer  Queen,  which  was  expected  from 
San  Francisco  at  any  hour.  Upon  the  arrival  of  Captain  Alexander  with  the 
Queen  at  Port  Townsend,  he  first  learned  of  the  situation  at  Seattle  and  when  he 
arrived  at  the  Ocean  Dock  he  ran  out  the  hot  water  hose,  declaring  he  would 
scald  all  persons  attempting  to  force  their  way  onto  the  ship.  They  willingly 
kept  at  a  distance.  But  the  city  was  completely  in  the  hands  of  the  mob.  The 
acting  Chief-of-Police  Murphy  and  nearly  all  of  the  poHce  force  were  aiding  in 
the  lawless  acts.  Early  in  the  day  Governor  Watson  C.  Squire,  being  in  the 
city,  issued  his  proclamation  ordering  them  to  desist  from  violence,  to  disperse 
and  return  to  their  homes.  Their  only  answer  was  yells  and  howls  of  defiance. 
He  ordered  out  two  military  companies  stationed  in  the  city  to  report  to  the 
sheriff  of  the  county  for  the  purpose  of  enforcing  the  laws.  A  squad  of  eighteen 
men  from  the  Home  Guards  escorted  C.  K.  Henry,  United  States  Department 
Marshall,  to  the  front  of  Dexter  Horton's  Bank,  where  the  governor's  proclama- 
tion was  read  to  the  howling  mob.  They  were  furious  at  the  presence  of  the 
armed  men  and  would  have  attacked  had  the  Guards  not  promptly  returned  to 
their  quarters  at  the  engine  house.  The  removal  of  the  Chinese  from  their 
homes  continued  till  there  were  about  three  hundred  and  fifty  herded  on  Ocean 
Dock  awaiting  the  transportation  by  rail  or  steamer  to  carry  them  away.  A 
strong  guard  of  rioters  was  placed  over  them.  Only  those  who  could  pay  their 
fare  were  permitted  to  board  the  ship.  The  citizens  subscribed  a  portion  of  the 
money  to  pay  the  fares  of  one  hundred,  being  all  that  could  be  carried  on  the 
boat.  In  the  meantime  a  writ  of  Habeas  Corpus  was  issued  by  Judge  Roger  S. 
Greene,  detaining  the  vessel  and  requiring  Captain  Alexander  to  produce  the 
Chinese  then  on  his  vessel  at  the  court  room  next  morning  at  eight  o'clock,  that 
each  Chinaman  might  be  informed  of  his  legal  rights  and  say  if  he  desired 
to  go  or  remain ;  that  if  he  wanted  to  remain  he  would  be  protected.  ILarly  in  the 
morning  of  the  7th,  the  Home  Guards  were  ordered  placed  where  they  could 
best  guard  the  city.  The  entire  force  was  posted  at  the  corner  of  Washington 
Street  and  Second  Avenue  and  details  sent  out  from  there  to  guard  a  portion 
of  the  city.  That  night  a  portion  of  the  Guards  and  the  Seattle  Rifle%  took  up 
their  quarters  at  the  Court  House,  Company  D  remaining  at  their  armory.  The 
authorities  were  active  during  the  entire  night  in  doing  everything  they  could 
to  enforce  the  laws.  Governor  Squire  telegraphed  the  Secretary  of  War,  also 
General  Gibbon,  commanding  the  Department  of  the  Columbia,  the  situation. 
About  midnight  an  attempt  was  made  to  move  the  Chinese  to  a  train  and  send 
a  part  of  them  out  of  the  city  that  way,  but  the  Seattle  Rifles  and  Company  D 
were  sent  to  guard  the  train  and  succeeded  in  getting  it  out  ahead  of  time.  While 
most  of  the  mob  that  had  not  yet  retired  was  down  at  the  train,  a  squad  of  the 
Home  Guards  was  detailed  to  take  possession  of  the  north  and  south  wings  of  the 
Ocean  Dock  upon  which  were  quartered  the  Chinese,  watched  over  by  McMillan, 
Kidd  and  others,  all  of  whom  were  prevented  by  the  Home  Guards  from  leaving 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  111 

the  dock.  By  daylight  the  Seattle  Rifles  and  University  Cadets  with  a  squad 
from  the  Home  Guards  were  lined  up  across  the  two  wing  approaches  to  the  main 
dock.  In  the  early  morning  the  mob  was  gathering  again  and  soon  the  adjoinino- 
wharves  and  streets  were  blocked  with  angry  men  who  saw  they  were  defeated 
in  keeping  charge  of  the  Chinese.  As  their  numbers  increased,  they  became 
bolder  and  declared  their  purpose  to  kill  or  drive  out  the  Guards.  Early  that 
morning  after  warrant  was  issued  by  George  G.  Lyon,  Justice  of  the  Peace,  the 
leading  agitators  were  arrested  and  locked  in  jail,  where  they  were  confined  at 
the  time  the  Home  Guards  escorted  the  Chinese  from  the  dock  to  the  courthouse 
pursuant  to  the  writ  of  Habeas  Corpus  issued  by  Judge  Greene.  Of  course  there 
would  have  been  a  skirmish  somewhere  between  the  dock  and  the  courthouse  if 
the  anti-Chinese  forces  had  not  been  deprived  of  their  leaders.  At  the  conclusion 
of  court  proceedings,  the  Home  Guards  escorted  all  of  the  Chinese  back  so  that 
those  who  were  to  leave  on  the  Queen  might  do  so  and  the  others  went  to  the  dock 
to  reclaim  their  personal  effects  which  they  had  carried  from  their  houses  or 
which  were  carted  there  by  the  mob.  At  this  time  the  leaders  who  had  been 
arrested  had  been  released  from  jail  on  bail,  at  least  some  of  them  had,  and  they 
acted  as  a  committee  to  disburse  money  which  had  been  raised  to  pay  the  passage 
of  those  Chinese  who  w^anted  to  go  to  San  Francisco  on  the  Queen.  The  com- 
mittee, or  some  members  of  it,  were  permitted  to  go  upon  the  dock,  but  the  mass 
of  anti-Chinese  forces  were  held  in  check  by  the  Home  Guards,  Seattle  Rifles 
and  University  Cadets,  who  maintained  a  line  across  the  docks  extending  from 
Main  Street  to  Washington  Street.  The  numbers  of  the  disorderly  element  were 
increasing  and  there  was  every  indication  of  trouble  ahead.  President  Powell 
of  the  University  had  been  mingling  among  the  crowd  and  informed  us  that  they 
were  planning  to  take  our  guns  away  from  us.  The  Guards  had  been  expecting 
this  and  were  prepared  all  the  time  for  trouble.  After  the  Queen  left,  the 
remaining  Chinese  were  ordered  moved  back  to  their  quarters  where  they  had 
been  living  and  the  Chinese  were  formed  in  column  with  baskets  and  bundles 
of  all  sizes  which  made  them  a  clumsy  lot  to  handle.  In  front  was  placed  the 
liome  Guards — the  Seattle  Rifles  and  the  University  Cadets  coming  two  hundred 
and  fifty  yards  in  the  rear.  The  march  began  up  Main  Street.  The  Home 
Guards  were  well  closed  up  as  they  had  been  cautioned  to  march  that  way. 
Crowds  of  men  were  on  the  street,  but  they  gave  way.  But  on  our  left,  on  the 
north  side  of  the  street,  they  now  lined  up  in  better  order  and  as  the  head  of 
the  column  reached  Commercial  Street  and  alongside  the  New  England  Hotel, 
at  a  signal  the  rioters  sprang  at  the  Guards  and  seized  a  number  of  their  guns, 
which  began  to  go  off.  The  rioters  instantly  let  go  the  guns  and  crowded  back. 
They  were  surprised  that  the  guns  were  loaded.  One  man  was  killed  and  four 
wounded.  This  seemed  to  have  the  desired  eff'ect  on  them.  Immediately  the 
Guards  were  formed  across  Commercial  Street  looking  north.  The  Seattle  Rifles 
and  University  Cadets  formed  on  Main  Street  facing  the  docks,  where  there 
was  a  large  crowd,  a  few  men  were  faced  to  the  south  and  east,  thus  forming 
a  square  at  Commercial  and  Main  Streets.  The  dense  mobs  were  in  the  streets 
to  the  north  and  west.  To  the  north  as  far  as  Yesler  Way  the  street  was  packed 
full  of  raving,  howling,  angry  men,  threatening  revenge  on  those  who  were  inter- 
fering with  their  lawlessness.  I  selected  Mr.  C.  H.  Hanford  and  Mr.  F.  H. 
Whit  worth  and  directed  them  to  press  the  crowd  back  so  as  to  keep  an  open 


112  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

space  between  our  line  and  the  front  of  the  mob.  Many  of  the  mob  were  seen 
with  arms.  At  the  time  of  shooting,  several  shots  were  fired  by  the  mob,  one  ball 
passing  through  the  sheriff's  coat,  but  none  of  our  men  were  hurt.  Back  a  dis- 
tance a  number  of  the  leaders  mounted  boxes  and  by  their  fierce  harangues  tried 
to  stir  the  mob  to  seek  revenge.  There  was  no  order  given  to  fire.  The  men 
understood  their  business  and  knew  when  to  shoot.  We  remained  in  this  position 
about  half  an  hour,  until  Captain  Haines,  with  Company  D,  appeared  coming 
down  the  street  from  the  north,  the  mob  cheering  with  great  delight  and  opening 
the  way  to  give  them  free  passage.  Shortly  afterwards  the  mob  called  on  John 
Keane  for  a  speech.  He  mounted  a  box  in  front  of  the  New  England  Hotel  and 
made  a  speech  in  the  following  words :  'All  of  ye's  go  to  your  homes.  There 
has  been  trouble  enough  this  day.'  Then  the  Home  Guards,  Rifles,  and  Cadets 
conducted  the  Chinese  to  their  quarters  and  then  marched  to  the  courthouse, 
which  from  that  time  on,  with  Company  D,  was  their  headquarters." 

In  the  afternoon  of  that  day  Governor  Watson  C.  Squire  proclaimed  the  city 
under  martial  law  and  the  Guards  and  militia  with  the  assistance  of  the  Volun- 
teers were  able  to  maintain  order  in  the  city.  In  the  meantime  the  president  of 
the  United  States  ordered  General  Gibbon,  who  was  stationed  at  Vancouver,  to 
send  federal  troops  to  the  aid  of  Seattle.  On  the  morning  of  the  lotli  Colonel 
de  Russy  arrived  with  the  Fourteenth  Infantry  to  relieve  the  Guards  and  militia, 
who  had  been  on  constant  duty  for  three  days  and  nights  Avithout  sleep  or  rest. 
With  the  arrival  of  the  regular  troops  the  disorderly  element  quieted  down  but 
the  leaders  of  the  Guards  and  militia  feared  that  when  the  federal  troops  were 
withdrawn  the  rioters  would  again  attempt  to  control  the  city.  Accordingly,  the 
Home  Guards,  the  Seattle  Rifles  and  Company  D  were  all  raised  to  one  hundred 
men  each  and  another  company  of  one  hundred  men  was  raised.  These  troops, 
which  represented  men  from  every  walk  of  life,  drilled  constantly  and  it  was 
well  that  they  did  so,  for  as  soon  as  the  regular  troops  had  gone,  it  became 
evident  that  the  mob  was  taking  steps  to  organize  an  armed  force.  Conditions 
were  so  unsettled  for  several  months  that  it  was  necessary  for  the  four  hundred 
men  to  continue  their  drilling  and  to  be  constantly  alert.  Eventually,  however, 
the  excitement  died  out  and  quiet  was  restored  and  business  again  went  on  as 
usual.  Too  great  praise  cannot  be  given  Mr.  Kinnear  for  the  course  which 'he 
pursued  in  connection  with  these  riots.  He  recognized  at  once  that  the  greatest 
public  enemies  are  those  who  seek  to  establish  mob  rule  and  overturn  the  forces 
of  order  and  good  government  and  he  recognized  the  necessity  of  maintaining 
the  rights  of  all.  His  insight  was  equalled  by  his  public  spirit  and  courage 
and  he  deserves  the  lasting  gratitude  of  Seattle  for  what  he  did  at  that  time 
to  maintain  her  honor  and  good  faith. 

Mr.  Kinnear  at  all  times  manifested  a  deep  interest  in  the  welfare  of  the  city 
and  in  working  for  its  improvement  kept  in  mind  the  future  as  well  as  the  present. 
In  1887  he  gave  to  the  city  fourteen  acres  of  land  which  overlooks  the  Sound  from 
the  west  side  of  Queen  Anne  Hill  and  which,  splendidly  improved,  now  consti- 
tutes beautiful  Kinnear  Park.  It  is  one  of  the  things  of  which  Seattle  is  proud 
and  as  the  city  grows  in  population  its  value  will  be  more  and  more  appreciated. 
In  many  other  ways  Mr.  Kinnear  manifested  his  foresight  and  his  concern  for 
the  public  good  and  he  was  a  potent  factor  in  the  development  of  the  city  along 
many  lines.     His  qualities  of  heart  and  mind  were  such  as  combined  to  form 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  113 

the  noblest  type  of  manhood  and  in  all  relations  of  life  he  conformed  to  the 
highest  moral  standards.  He  was  not  only  universally  conceded  to  be  a  man 
of  unusual  ability  and  one  of  the  foremost  citizens  of  Seattle,  but  he  was  personally 
popular.  In  the  spring  and  summer  of  1910  he  and  his  wife  toured  Europe  and 
at  that  time  wrote  a  number  of  extremely  interesting  articles  relative  to  the  dif- 
ferent countries  through  which  they  traveled,  and  these  articles  are  still  in  the 
possession  of  the  family.  Of  Mr.  Kinnear  it  has  been  said:  "He  was  as  upright 
as  he  was  in  stature — honest,  energetic,  clear-headed  and  generous.  He  met  his 
responsibilities  fearlessly  and  lived  his  life  worthily.  He  was  willing  to  be  per- 
suaded along  right  lines — but  he  was  not  to  be  badgered.  He  was  as  kind  hearted 
as  he  was  hearty  and  he  had  not  been  sick  since  the  war."  During  the  later  years 
of  his  life  Mr.  Kinnear  traveled  extensively  and  took  the  greatest  pleasure  in 
being  in  the  open,  near  to  nature's  heart.  On  the  21st  of  July,  1912,  he  spent  a 
day  on  Steilacoom  Plains,  returning  by  automobile  in  the  evening.  On  the  fol- 
lowing morning  he  was  seen  watering  the  flowers  on  the  front  porch  and  later 
entered  the  house,  awaiting  the  call  for  the  morning  meal,  but  when  it  came,  life 
had  passed  and  he  had  gone  on  as  he  wished,  without  a  period  of  wearisome 
illness,  but  in  the  midst  of  health  and  action  and  good  cheer.  His  going  calls  to 
mind  the  words  of  James  Whitcomb  Riley. 

"I  cannot  say,  and  I  will  not  say 
That  he  is  dead.    He  is  just  away! 
With  a   cheery   smile,   and  a   wave  of   the  hand, 
He  has  wandered  into  an  unknown  land, 
And  left  us  dreaming  how  very  fair 
It  needs  must  be,  since  he  lingers  there. 
And  you,  O  you,  who  the  wildest  yearn 
For  the  old-time  step  and  the  glad  return — 
Think  of  him  faring  on,  as  dear 
In  the  love  of  There  as  the  love  of  Here ; 
Think  of  him  still  as  the  same,  I  say ; 
He  is  not  dead — he  is  just  away!" 


GUS  LAFAYETTE  THACKER. 

Gus  Lafayette  Thacker  is  one  of  the  leading  attorneys  practicing  at  the  bar  of 
Lewis  county  with  offices  in  the  Coffman-Dobson  building  at  Chehalis.  He  was 
born  in  Springfield,  Missouri,  October  17,  1883,  and  is  the  oldest  in  a  family 
of  five  children,  his  parents  being  James  G.  and  S.  A.  (Hodge)  Thacker,  both 
natives  of  Tennessee.  Believing  in  the  advantages  of  the  far  west  the  father 
brought  his  family  to  Washington  in  1886  and  located  at  Winlock,  Lewis  county. 
He  is  now  living  on  a  farm  near  Centralia,  having  made  agricultural  pursuits  his 
life  work. 

During  his  boyhood  Gus  L.  Thacker  attended  the  country  schools  of  Lewis 
county  and  later  completed  is  education  at  the  State  University  in  Seattle.  On 
the  I  St  of  June,  1906,  he  was  admitted  to  the  bar  and  at  once  entered  upon  prac- 


114  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

tice  with  M.  A.  Langhorne,  now  of  Tacoma.  During  the  eleven  years  that  have 
since  passed  Mr.  Thacker  has  always  maintained  his  office  in  the  Coffman-Dob- 
son  building  where  he  is  now  located.  Although  a  comparatively  young  man 
he  has  already  attained  a  position  of  prominence  in  his  chosen  profession  and 
from  1906  to  1908  served  as  assistant  prosecuting  attorney  of  Lewis  county. 

Mr.  Thacker  was  married  in  Toledo,  Oregon,  in  1907,  to  Miss  Minnie  Pearsall, 
of  Chehalis,  Washington,  a  daughter  of  J.  A.  and  Emma  (Russell)  Pearsall,  both 
of  whom  are  now  deceased.  Her  maternal  grandfather  built  the  first  sawmill 
at  Chehalis.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Thacker  have  a  little  son  eight  years  of  age,  Loren, 
now  in  school. 

Since  attaining  his  majority,  Mr.  Thacker  has  always  affiliated  with  the 
republican  party  and  is  chairman  of  the  Lewis  county  republican  central  com- 
mittee. In  religious  faith  he  is  a  Presbyterian.  He  is  quite  prominent  in  fraternal 
organizations,  belonging  to  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  the  Knights 
of  Pythias,  the  Woodmen  of  the  World,  the  Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen, 
the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  the  Loyal  Order  of  Moose  and  the 
Fraternal  Order  of  Eagles,  and  he  is  also  a  member  of  the  Commercial  Club  of 
Chehalis.  Being  a  musician  of  ability,  he  organized  the  Military  Band  on  the 
4th  of  July,  1913,  and  has  since  served  as  its  director  and  manager.  It  has  become 
one  of  the  most  noted  bands  of  this  part  of  the  state,  now  having  a  membership 
of  thirty-two,  and  it  is  called  upon  to  take  part  in  all  popular  entertainments 
and  is  also  used  for  advertising  purposes  in  Chehalis.  For  over  thirty  years 
Mr.  Thacker  has  been  a  resident  of  Lewis  county  and  he  can  well  remember 
when  the  present  site  of  Chehalis  was  covered  with  brush  and  stumps.  He  has 
taken  a  great  interest  in  the  development  of  the  city,  is  delighted  with  the 
climate  of  this  region  and  has  firm  faith  in  the  future  greatness  of  western 
Washington. 


HON.  JOHN  W.  KLEEB. 

Hon.  John  W.  Kleeb,  of  South  Bend,  has  become  prominently  known  in  busi- 
ness connections  and  as  one  of  the  lawmakers  of  the  state.  In  fact  it  is  said  that 
he  has  done  more  for  Pacific  county  than  any  three  other  men.  He  is  generous, 
philanthropic  and  just  and  his  word  is  as  good  as  a  bond.  A  native  of  Fayette, 
Iowa,  he  was  born  and  reared  upon  a  farm,  and  while  acquiring  a  common  school 
education  by  attendance  during  the  winter  months,  he  devoted  the  summer  seasons 
to  farm  work.  At  the  age  of  sixteen  he  secured  employment  in  a  grocery  store, 
where  he  remained  for  a  year  and  afterward  spent  two  years  in  a  dry  goods  store, 
in  which  connection  he  worked  up  from  errand  boy  to  head  salesman  in  a  year. 
This  was  at  Dunlap,  Iowa.  Later  he  engaged  in  business  on  his  own  account  at 
Panama,  Iowa,  as  a  general  merchant  for  a  year,  at  the  end  of  which  time  he 
sold  out  there  and  became  a  resident  of  Council  Bluffs,  Iowa,  where  he  estab- 
lished a  store  and  was  engaged  in  the  grocery  trade  until  his  removal  to  the 
northwest.  He  had  been  quite  successful  as  a  merchant  in  Iowa,  having  begun 
business  in  Panama  with  a  cash  capital  of  but  four  hundred  dollars,  and  during 
the  first  year  he  cleared  seven  thousand  dollars.  While  living  in  Panama  he  also 
became  connected  with  banking  and  he  likewise  filled  the  office  of  postmaster. 


HON.  JOHN  W.  KLEEB 


THE   NEW   YOKK 

PUBLIC  UBRARY 

ASTOR,   LENOX 
..DEN  FOUNDATION 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  117 

With  his  removal  to  Tacoma  in  1888,  Mr.  Kleeb  first  secured  employment  in 
a  dry  goods  store  and  later  embarked  in  the  real  estate  business,  in  which  he 
continued  until  1892.     He  took  with  him  to  Tacoma  a  capital  of  about  fifteen 
thousand  dollars,  which  he  there  invested.     He  became  extensively  and  success- 
fully  engaged   in   real   estate   dealing  through   the  years   of   Tacoma's  greatest 
growth  and  activity.    In  1893  he  took  a  trip  to  the  east  and  was  away  most  of  the 
year,  spending  considerable  time  at  various  places  and  the  greater  part  of  the 
summer  at  the  World's  Columbian  Exposition  in  Chicago.     In  1894  he  returned 
to  Tacoma  and  engaged  in  the  wholesale  lumber  and  shingle  business,  purchasing 
in  large  quantities  from  the  mills  and  shipping  to  retailers  throughout  the  east. 
In  this  connection,  too,  his  business  prospered.    He  resided  in  Tacoma  until  1898, 
when  he  removed  to  South  Bend  and  erected  his  sawmill,  which  was  very  modern 
in  construction  and  equipment.     In  1910  it  was  completely  equipped  throughout 
with  electrically  driven  machinery  of  every  kind  necessary  to  the  business.     It 
was  the  first  sawmill  fully  equipped  in  that  manner  in  the  state  and  one  of  the 
first  in  the  entire  country.     He  received  many  letters  from  different  parts  of  the 
country,  asking  how  successful  his  plan  proved  and  if  he  would  again  equip  it 
electrically  if  he  were  building.     From  his  plant  he  furnished  all  of  the  electric 
light  for  South  Bend  up  to  the  time  his  mill  was  destroyed  by  fire.    The  product 
of  his  mill  was  shipped  all  over  the  Union,  but  on  the  15th  of  December,  1916,  a 
disastrous  fire  occurred  in  which  the  sawmill,  planing  mill  and  a  part  of  the  sheds 
were  destroyed,  causing  a  loss  of  one  hundred  and  fifty  thousand  dollars.     He 
employed  one  hundred  men,  who  turned  out  thirty  million  feet  of  lumber  in  a 
year.     He  also  maintained  two  logging  camps  in  connection  with  the  business, 
which  proved  a  very  profitable  undertaking  until  the  great  fire.    He  finished  lumber 
of  all  kinds  at  the  mills  and  he  maintained  a  lumberyard  at  Pasco,  Washington, 
where  he  has  likewise  invested  in  considerable  property,  owning  a  number  of 
houses  there.     He  has  furthermore  become  interested  in  a  stock  and  fruit  ranch 
on  the  Columbia  river,  near  Pasco,  and  he  has  an  electric  pumping  plant,  pumping 
water  for  irrigation  and  also  furnishing  light  to  his  place.     Upon  his  ranch  is  a 
canning  factory,  which  enables  him  to  handle  all  bruised  fruit  or  fruit  which  is 
too  ripe  for  shipment.     He  cans  both  fruit  and  vegetables,  nothing  being  wasted, 
and  in  addition  he  shipped  fourteen  car  loads  of  apples  and  peaches  in  191 5.    He 
is  likewise  one  of  the  owners  of  the  Nahcotta  Clam  Cannery  and  is  a  stockholder 
in  the  Tokeland  Oyster  Company,  of  which  he  was  manager  for  a  year,  during 
which  time  it  paid  forty  thousand  dollars  in  dividends.    Those  who  read  between 
the  lines  will  recognize  at  once  that  Mr.  Kleeb  is  a  man  of  notable  business  ability, 
sagacity  and  understanding.    He  has  learned  the  secret  of  success — the  attainment 
of  maximum  results  with  a  minimum  expenditure  of  time,  labor  and  material. 
He  has  always  made  it  his  purpose  to  give  full  value  received.    At  the  same  time 
there  is  no  useless  waste  in  anything  that  he  does  and  his  own  business  insight 
enables  him  to  carefully  and  wisely  direct  the  labors  of  those  who  serve  him.    He 
is  interested  in  real  estate  at  various  points  and  his  efforts  and  interests  have  at 
all  times  constituted  a  contributing  factor  to  the  development  of  the  northwest. 

On  the  1 6th  of  January,  19 12,  Mr.  Kleeb  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Henrietta  Towsley,  of  Tacoma,  and  they  have  a  daughter,  Agnes  Lincoln,  who 
was  born  November  18,  191 5.     The  baby  was  named  at  the  good  roads  conven- 


118  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

tion  held   in   Spokane,   at  the  suggestion   of   Hon.   Earles,  a  well  known   Ohio 
statesman. 

Mr.  Kleeb  has  always  taken  a  very  prominent,  active  and  helpful  part  in 
public  affairs  and  while  in  Tacoma  he  served  for  two  terms  as  a  member  of  the 
city  council,  duringWvhich  many  of  the  streets  were  paved.  He  was  made  chair- 
man of  the  judiciary  committee  of  the  city  council  and  was  instrumental  in  per- 
fecting a  charter  for  the  electric  street  railway  that  redounds  much  to  Tacoma's. 
credit  in  a  business  way.  He  was  likewise  a  member  of  the  Tacoma  Chamber 
of  Commerce  and  in  191 4  he  was  elected  to  represent  his  district  in  the  state 
senate  of  Washington,  of  which  he  is  now  a  member.  He  has  always  given  his 
political  allegiance  to  the  republican  party,  which  finds  in  him  a  stalwart  cham- 
pion. He  belongs  to  the  Commercial  Club  and  fraternally  is  connected  with  the 
Knights  of  Pythias.  He  has  been  a  generous  supporter  of  various  churches  and 
he  stands  at  all  times  for  those  activities  and  interests  which  contribute  to  public 
progress.  His  is  the  notable  and  commendable  career  of  a  self-made  man  who 
from  the  age  of  sixteen  years  has  been  dependent  upon  his  own  resources  and  in 
the  attainment  of  success  has  followed  a  course  which  will  bear  the  closest  investi- 
gation and  scrutiny.  He  has  also  ever  been  of  a  most  generous  and  helpful  dis- 
position. While  operating  his  sawmill  he  trusted  hundreds  of  people  for  lumber 
with  which  to  build  homes  and  his  gifts  in  charity  undoubtedly  amount  to  one 
hundred  thousand  dollars.  He  has  ever  been  ready  to  extend  a  helping  hand  to 
those  in  need  of  assistance  and  the  work  which  he  has  done  for  Pacific  county 
places  him  among  the  builders  of  this  great  state. 


MAJOR  CHARLES  O.  BATES. 

Major  Charles  O.  Bates  is  now  engaged  in  the  practice  of  law  in  Tacoma 
and  is  a  member  of  the  Pierce  County,  Washington  State  and  National  Bar 
Associations.  There  is  too  in  his  life  history  a  most  interesting  military  record 
covering  active  service  upon  the  frontier  in  connection  with  the  protection  of 
frontier  outposts  from  Indian  hostility.  He  comes  to  the  west  from  the  Missis- 
sippi valley,  his  birth  having  occurred  at  Almont,  Michigan,  May  31,  1855. 
The  ancestral  line  is  traced,  back  to  England  and  in  the  period  antedating  the 
Revolutionary  war  members  of  the  family  came  to  the  new  world.  The  Rev. 
Henry  Bates,  father  of  Major  Bates,  was  a  native  of  New  England  and  at  the 
time  of  the  Civil  war  was  a  resident  of  Marietta,  Ohio.  He  became  a  stanch 
supporter  of  the  abolition  movement,  active  in  promulgating  that  doctrine  and 
he  was  a  warm  personal  friend  of  Abraham  Lincoln.  In  early  manhood  he  was 
graduated  from  Oberlin  College,  at  Oberlin.  Ohio,  and  became  a  preacher  o^ 
the  Congregational  denomination,  devoting  his  entire  life  to  the  work  of  the 
ministry.  In  1867  he  became  a  resident  of  Illinois  and  in  1872  removed  to 
Nebraska,  where  he  remained  until  his  death,  which  occurred  in  1890,  when 
he  was  seventy-five  years  of  age.  For  almost  a  quarter  of  a  century  he  was 
survived  by  his  wife,  who  lived  to  the  age  of  ninety  years,  passing  away  in 
Franklin,  Nebraska,  in  1913.  She  bore  the  name  of  Keziah  Chapman  and  was 
born  in   New   England  and  came  of  English  ancestry.     The  Rev.   Henry  and 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  119 

Keziah  Bates  had  six  children.  One  of  these  is  the  Rev.  Henry  L.  Bates,  who 
is  a  member  of  the  faculty  of  the  Pacific  University  at  Forest  Grove,  Oregon. 

Major  Charles  O.  Bates  pursued  a  public  school  education  in  Michigan  and 
in  Canton,  Illinois,  completing  a  high  school  course.  After  the  removal  of  the 
family  to  Plymouth,  Nebraska,  he  secured  a  situation  in  1873,  at  Beatrice, 
Nebraska,  spending  two  years  in  a  general  mercantile  establishment  there.  He 
was  afterward  with  the  firm  of  Colby  &  Hazlett,  attorneys  at  law  of  Beatrice, 
with  whom  he  pursued  his  studies  until  admitted  to  the  bar  in  that  state  on 
the  31st  of  October,  1878.  He  was  admitted  to  practice  before  the  supreme  court 
in  1880  and  remained  in  successful  practice  at  Beatrice  until  1891.  During  his 
residence  there  he  was  county  attorney  of  Gage  county  and  served  for  one 
term.  He  also  spent  two  terms  as  city  attorney,  making  a  most  creditable  record 
in  the  otifice. 

Attracted  by  the  growing  opportunities  of  the  northwest  Mr.  Bates  came 
to  Washington  in  1892,  arriving  in  Tacoma  on  the  ist  of  June.  He  immediately 
entered  upon  active  practice  here  and  has  since  been  continuously  connected 
with  his  profession,  during  which  period  he  served  for  one  term  as  prosecuting 
attorney  of  Tacoma.  He  is  an  able  lawyer,  well  versed  in  the  principles  of 
jurisprudence  and  seldom,  if  ever,  at  fault  in  the  application  of  a  legal  principle. 
His  colleagues  recognize  his  ability  and  he  is  numbered  among  the  valued  rep- 
resentatives of  the  Pierce  County,  Washington  State  and  National  Bar  Asso- 
ciations. During  the  past  few  years  he  has  specialized  largely  in  corporation 
law  and  he  is  now  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Bates,  Peer  &  Peterson. 

In  December,  1876,  in  Lincoln,  Nebraska,  Mr.  Bates  was  married  to  Miss 
Mary  Kathleen  Gillette,  a  native  of  that  state  and  a  daughter  of  Capt.  Lee  P. 
Gillette,  a  Civil  war  veteran  and  a  representative  of  an  old  and  prominent  family 
of  Nebraska  City.  He  served  as  captain  in  the  First  Nebraska  Regiment  during 
the  period  of  hostilities  between  the  north  and  the  south  and  both  he  and  his 
wife  have  now  passed  away.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bates  have  become  parents  of  two 
children.  Etta  Chapman  and  Russell  Gillette.  The  former  is  the  wife  of 
Eugene  D.  Roberts,  the  vice  president  of  the  Puget  Sound  Iron  &  Steel  Works 
of  Tacoma.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bates  reside  at  Bonneville  Hotel.  While  he  has 
made  the  practice  of  law  his  real  life  work  he  has  also  become  interested  in 
other  business  projects  and  is  now  an  attorney  of  the  Sunset  Telephone  &  Tele- 
graph Company  and  other  corporations.  He  was  one  of  the  prime  factors  in 
the  erection  of  the  new  Elks  building  in  Tacoma  and  is  very  prominent  in  the 
Elks  lodge,  of  which  he  is  past  exalted  ruler.  He  is  also  well  known  as  a  Mason, 
belonging  to  Lebanon  Lodge,  F.  &  A.  M.  of  Tacoma,  and  to  the  Royal  Arch 
chapter. 

His  military  service  is  most  interesting  and  covers  service  as  adjutant  of 
the  First  Regiment  of  the  Nebraska  National  Guard,  which  he  joined  as  a 
private  in  1880.  He  was  afterward  promoted  to  the  rank  of  first  lieutenant  of 
Company  C  and  was  made  adjutant  of  the  first  regiment  on  its  formation, 
November  20,  1886.  On  the  formation  of  the  brigade  he  was  promoted  to 
assistant  adjutant  general  with  the  rank  of  major  and  thus  continued  until  he 
came  to  the  northwest.  He  was  engaged  in  active  duty  during  the  winter  of 
1890-91,  following  the  outbreak  of  the  Sioux  Indian  war  at  Pine  Ridge  agency 
in    South   Dakota,   at    which    time    General    Miles   commanded    the    troops.      In 


120  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

politics  yir.  Bates  is  an  earnest  and  active  supporter  of  the  republican  party. 
His  local  connections  are  with  the  Commercial  Club  and  he  is  also  a  member 
of  the  Union  and  the  Lockburn  Golf  Clubs.  His  life  has  been  one  of  intense 
activity,  intelligently  directed  into  those  channels  through  which  flow  the  great- 
est good  to  the  greatest  number  and  his  efforts  have  brought  him  a  measure  of 
success  which  is  most  desirable  and  have  also  proven  of  benefit  to  his  fellow- 
men  in  many  fields. 


WILLIAM  H.  PINCKNEY. 

William  H.  Pinckney,  police  jtidge  of  Blaine,  arrived  in  this  city  in  1873  accom- 
panied by  his  bride,  for  it  was  their  wedding  trip.  They  journeyed  westward  from 
Iowa  by  way  of  the  Union  Pacific  to  Seattle  and  on  the  old  Prince  Albert  went 
to  Victoria.  Mr.  Pinckney  purchased  forty  acres  of  land  adjacent  to  the  town 
site  of  Semiahmoo,  now  Blaine,  and  lived  upon  it  until  winter,  when  he  returned 
to  Iowa.  In  1877  he  came  again  to  Washington  and  after  living  for  about  a  year 
in  Whatcom  county  removed  to  Seattle,  where  he  remained  from  1878  until  about 
1896.  His  early  arrival  here  places  him  as  one  of  the  pioneer  settlers  of  the 
northwest. 

Mr.  Pinckney  was  born  in  Michigan  in  1843  ^"^  i"  1^56  started  for  Iowa. 
Father,  mother  and  six  children  drove  across  the  country  with  two  yoke  of  oxen 
and  settled  on  the  Big  Sioux  river  in  1857.  The  father.  Joshua  B.  Pinckney,  was 
not  only  a  pioneer  of  Iowa  but  also  of  western  Washington,  where  he  arrived  in 
the  year  1873.  The  pioneer  spirit  seems  an  inherent  quality  in  the  family,  for 
the  ancestry  is  traced  back  to  one  who  came  from  Yorkshire,  England,  in  1649 
and  aided  in  the  early  colonization  of  the  new  world.  At  the  time  of  the  Black 
Hawk  war  in  1832,  Joshua  B.  Pinckney  served  in  defense  of  the  interests  of  the 
white  settlers,  commanding  the  Second  ^Militia  Regiment  as  colonel.  He  married 
Hannah  Mills,  a  native  of  New  Hampshire,  who  also  belonged  to  one  of  the  early 
American  families  of  Scotch  lineage.  Both  the  Pinckney  and  the  Mills  families 
were  represented  in  the  Revolutionary  war  by  those  who  actively  participated  in 
winning  American  independence.  As  the  tide  of  emigration  steadily  drifted  west- 
ward, members  of  the  Pinckney  family  lived  upon  the  frontier,  Joshua  B.  Pinck- 
ney becoming  a  frontier  settler  of  Michigan,  afterward  of  Iowa  and  eventually 
of  Washington.  In  the  family  were  two  sons  who  did  not  come  to  the  west, 
Charles  remaining  in  Iowa,  while  John  AI.  retained  his  residence  in  Sioux  City, 
that  state.  He  served  with  his  brother  William  at  his  first  enlistment  against 
the  Indians. 

William  H.  Pinckney  had  become  familiar  with  various  phases  of  pioneer  life 
ere  his  removal  to  Washington — a  life  that  calls  forth  the  latent  resources  and 
capabilities  of  the  individual.  While  in  Seattle  he  opened  a  real  estate  office  which 
he  conducted  for  a  time  and  then  sold  to  the  firm  of  West  &  Wheeler,  this  being 
now  one  of  the  oldest  of  the  long  established  real  estate  business  interests  of  that 
city.  Before  entering  that  field  Mr.  Pinckney  had  been  employed  at  any  work 
which  would  yield  him  an  honest  living,  but  in  1888  he  began  dealing  in  real  es- 
tate in  the  old  Union  block,  where  he  remained  until  his  office  was  destroyed  in 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  121 

the  great  conflagration  of  1889.  He  afterward  did  business  in  a  tent  on  Spring 
street  until  business  blocks  were  rebuilt.  He  continued  to  operate  in  real  estate 
in  Seattle  until  1896,  when  he  came  to  Blaine.  He  was  on  the  police  force  of 
Seattle  for  four  years  and  was  night  captain  there  for  a  time.  He  also  built  four 
residence  properties  in  Seattle  and  took  an  active  part  in  promoting  and  develop- 
ing the  city.  He  handled  what  was  known  as  the  Pleasant  Valley  addition  and 
built  a  road  at  a  personal  cost  of  four  hundred  and  seventy-five  dollars.  He  dis- 
posed of  much  property  while  there  and  became  a  well  known  factor  in  real  estate 
circles  but  eventually  left  the  city  to  take  up  his  abode  on  a  ranch  at  Semiahmoo 
which  he  owned.  He  remained  thereon  for  several  years,  devoting  his  attention 
to  general  farming,  after  which  he  came  to  Blaine  and  opened  a  real  estate  and 
fire  insurance  business.  His  operations  along  those  lines  brought  success  and  he 
still  handles  property  interests  here.  He  has  been  chosen  police  judge  on  two  dif- 
ferent occasions  and  is  now  filling  that  office.  He  was  also  justice  of  the  peace 
for  a  number  of  years  and  in  his  court  rendered  decisions  which  were  strictly  fair 
and  impartial.  In  politics  he  is  an  independent  republican,  considering  only  the 
capability  of  the  candidate  at  local  elections  where  no  political  issue  is  involved. 

Judge  Pinckney  has  an  interesting  military  chapter  in  his  life  history.  While 
at  Sioux  City,  Iowa,  he  enlisted  as  a  member  of  Company  E  of  the  Northern 
Border  Brigade  in  August,  1862,  following  the  Indian  massacres  there.  He  after- 
ward joined  Company  L  of  the  Seventh  Iowa  Volunteer  Cavalry  under  Captain 
S.  P.  Hughes,  serving  in  all  for  two  and  one-half  years  in  upper  Missouri.  Fra- 
ternally he  is  connected  with  Reynolds  Post,  No.  32,  G.  A.  R.,  which  he  joined  in 
191 3,  having  previously  been  a  member  of  Stevens  Post.  No.  i,  of  Seattle.  The 
ranks  of  old  soldiers  are  fast  being  decimated  but  the  post  at  Blaine  still  numbers 
sixteen  members.  Judge  Pinckney  is  also  connected  with  the  Independent  Order 
of  Odd  Fellows. 

In  1873  Judge  Pinckney  was  united  in  marriage  at  Elk  Point,  South  Dakota, 
to  Miss  Anna  Jackson,  whose  grandfather  was  an  own  cousin  of  General  Andrew 
Jackson.  They  have  one  son,  John  J.,  who  was  educated  in  Seattle,  where  he 
read  law,  working  his  own  way  there.  One  of  the  strongly  marked  characteristics 
of  the  family  has  been  their  readiness  to  enlist  and  fight  for  justice,  right  and 
freedom.  The  ancestors  of  Judge  Pinckney  have  ever  acquitted  themselves  with 
honor  and  credit  on  the  battlefield,  while  his  own  record  is  in  harmony  therewith. 


E.  EDSON. 


No  other  drug  store  in  Whatcom  county  has  been  conducted  so  long  imder 
the  same  management  as  that  of  E.  Edson  at  Lynden,  who  twenty-six  years 
ago  purchased  the  store  of  which  he  has  since  been  the  proprietor.  He  has  con- 
centrated his  efforts  upon  the  development  of  the  trade  and  has  become  widely 
known  in  this  connection.  At  native  son  of  Iowa,  he  was  born  in  i860,  his  par- 
ents being  G.  M.  and  M.  E.  Edson.  His  father  was  a  physician  and  died  in  the 
east.  The  mother  and  a  sister  of  E.  Edson  came  to  Washington  in  1883,  in 
which  year  he  also  c-ame  to  this  state,  and  the  mother  is  still  living  at  Belling- 
ham,  which  was  called  Whatcom  when  the  family  home  was  established  there. 


122  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

E.  Edson  remained  a  resident  of  Bellingham  until  1891.  He  had  removed  from 
Kansas  to  this  state  and  in  the  year  mentioned  he  took  up  his  abode  at  Lynden, 
where  he  bought  out  the  Long  drug  store.  Through  all  the  intervening  years 
he  has  conducted  a  substantial  business,  his  trade  constantly  increasing  with  the 
growth  of  the  city.  In  1909  he  erected  a  substantial  business  building  which  he 
has  since  occupied.  His  store  is  tasteful  in  its  arrangement  and  he  carries  a 
complete  line  of  drugs  and  druggists'  sundries. 

In  1891  Mr.  Edson  was  married  in  Bellingham  and  he  has  two  children: 
Agnes,  the  wife  of  O.  H.  Hadley,  of  California ;  and  Gale,  who  is  now  a  mem- 
ber of  the  University  of  Washington  Ambulance  Corps  of  the  United  States 
Army 

In  community  affairs  j\Ir.  Edson  has  always  taken  a  very  active  and  helpful 
interest  and  his  fellow  townsmen,  appreciative  of  his  worth  and  ability,  have 
called  him  to  various  local  offices.  He  has  served  as  city  clerk,  as  a  member  of 
the  city  council  and  as  mayor.  He  has  ever  been  deeply  interested  in  the  What- 
com County  Fair  Association,  of  which  he  has  served  as  vice  president  and  as 
president.  This  association  was  incorporated  in  1910  with  Mr.  Waples  as  pres- 
ident, Mr.  Edson  as  vice  president,  Mr.  Serrurier  as  treasurer  and  Air.  Stuart 
as  secretary.  The  fair  is  held  each  year  on  grounds  covering  twenty  acres  and 
well  equipped  with  buildings  for  the  purpose.  The  half  mile  race  track  is  the 
best  north  of  Seattle  and  there  are  four  days  of  racing  during  the  annual  fair, 
which  opens  on  Tuesday  and  closes  on  Saturday  night.  There  are  two  main 
buildings  fifty  by  one  hundred  feet  and  three  educational  buildings  twenty-four 
by  sixty  feet.  There  is  a  poultry  building,  a  four  hundred  foot  cattle  stable 
and  a  one  hundred  foot  horse  stable,  besides  stables  and  paddock  for  racing 
stock.  The  grandstand  has  a  capacity  of  between  six  and  seven  hundred.  The 
directors  are  W.  H.  Waples,  Nels  Jacobson,  A.  H.  Frasier,  G.  Vander  Griend, 
W.  H.  Jackman  and  N.  E.  Sorensen.  These  gentlemen  are  wisely  directing  the 
interests  of  the  association  and  making  the  fair  of  value  as  a  stimulus  to  local 
enterprise  and  progress. 


N.  J.  BLAGEN. 


A  native  of  Denmark,  N.  J.  Blagen  was  born  July  18,  1850,  and  after  spend- 
ing the  first  twenty  years  of  his  life  in  his  native  country  came  to  the  United 
States  in  1871,  desirous  of  enjoying  some  of  the  business  opportunities  which  he 
heard  were  to  be  secured  on  this  side  the  /Vtlantic.  He  was  empty  handed  at  the 
time  of  his  arrival,  but  he  possessed  industry  and  determination — qualities  which 
constitute  a  splendid  basis  for  the  attainment  of  success.  Making  his  way  to 
Minnesota,  he  worked  on  a  farm  there  for  six  months  at  sixteen  dollars  per  month, 
during  which  time  he  saved  ninety-six  dollars  or  every  cent  that  he  had  earned. 
He  had  learned  the  carpenter's  trade  in  his  native  country  and  after  a  short 
stay  in  Minnesota  went  to  Chicago,  where  he  held  good  positions  in  the  line  of 
his  trade  for  four  years,  after  which  he  began  contracting  on  his  own  account.  In 
1876  he  removed  from  Chicago  to  California  and  in  1877  became  a  resident  of 
Portland,  Oregon,  where  he  remained  until  1906,  during  which  period  he  engaged 


N.  J.  BLAGEN 


THE  NEW  YORK 
PUBLIC  LIBRARY 

ASTOR,    LENOX 
Tli-DEN  FOUNDATION 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  125 

in  the  contracting  and  milling  business  in  Oregon  and  in  Washington  and  also  in 
the  eastern  states.  He  took  his  first  contract  in  Washington  in  1883  and  so  con- 
tinued in  business  until  1901.  In  1896,  1897  ^^^  1898  he  was  occupied  with  build- 
ing a  part  of  the  metropolitan  water  system  of  Boston,  Massachusetts,  and  also 
a  steel  pipe  line  eight  miles  long  and  four  feet  in  diameter  for  the  city  of  New 
Bedford.  It  required  five  miles  of  railway  in  order  to  carry  on  the  work  of  con- 
struction. In  1883  he  built  the  plant  of  the  Portland  Flour  Milling  Company  at 
Portland,  Oregon,  and  in  1889  he  built  the  flour  mill  plant  of  the  Puget  Sound 
Flour  Mill  Company  in  Tacoma  and  its  wharf  and  dock.  In  1888  he  built  the 
Jewish  synagogue  in  Portland  and  in  1893  erected  the  First  Baptist  church  of 
Portland,  known  as  the  White  Temple,  supplying  everything  for  it  except  the 
carpet.  It  remains  today  the  finest  church  edifice  in  Portland — a  commodious, 
beautiful  and  stately  structure. 

Another  most  important  work  which  has  claimed  the  attention  of  Mr.  Blagen 
was  his  connection  with  the  building  of  the  Northern  Pacific  Railway  from  Ellens- 
burg  west  to  a  point  about  four  miles  east  of  Green  River  Hot  Springs,  including 
the  mountain  grade,  the  switchback  over  the  summit  and  the  tunnels,  with  the 
exception  of  the  main  Cascade  tunnel,  which  was  built  by  Nelson  Bennett.  Mr. 
Blagen,  however,  supplied  most  of  the  timber  for  the  tunnel,  all  being  cut  in  his 
mill.  The  contract  was  taken  in  the  spring  in  1886  and  the  work  was  to  be  com- 
pleted in  two  years.  Afterward,  because  of  congress  trying  to  pass  a  bill  causing 
the  Northern  Pacific  to  forfeit  its  land  grant,  the  railway  company  forced  Mr. 
Blagen's  firm  to  complete  the  work  in  a  little  over  a  year,  the  connection  of  the 
track  being  made  on  the  14th  of  June,  1887,  taking  place  practically  on  the  summit 
of  the  mountain  at  trestle  No.  14  of  the  switchback.  It  was  and  still  is  considered 
one  of  the  most  wonderful  undertakings  that  has  ever  been  accomplished  in  rail- 
road building  to  complete  such  a  heavy  piece  of  mountain  work  with  twelve  feet 
of  snow  upon  the  mountains  while  the  work  was  being  done.  For  two  months  one 
thousand  Chinamen  and  also  white  men  were  employed  at  shoveling  snow,  which 
would  blow  back  over  the  grade  during  the  night.  Mr.  Blagen  invented  overhead 
cables  used  in  this  work  and  which  were  afterward  patented  by  the  Lockwood 
Company,  the  engines  to  handle  the  cables,  while  the  work  was  conducted  accord- 
ing to  new  plans  devised  by  Mr.  Blagen.  The  No.  14  trestle  was  built  in  fourteen 
days,  the  structure  being  three  stories  in  height  or  eighty  feet  and  utilizing  three 
quarters  of  a  million  feet  of  timber.  Mr.  Blagen  was  manager,  with  J.  J.  Donovan 
as  engineer,  and  the  work  was  prosecuted  through  the  deepest  snow  that  had  fallen 
in  the  Cascades  until  191 6.  Mr.  Blagen  also  owned  and  operated  the  mill  that  cut 
the  timber  and  lumber  for  the  switchback  and  in  fact  he  was  one  of  three  who  prac- 
tically financed  the  entire  contract.  This  is  regarded  as  one  of  the  most  notable 
pieces  of  work  that  has  been  accomplished  in  the  development  of  the  northwest. 

He  became  identified  with  the  Grays  Harbor  Lumber  Company  in  1905, 
when  he  organized  the  business,  of  which  he  became  president  and  general  man- 
ager, with  C.  G.  Blagen,  his  son,  as  secretary  and  assistant  manager.  In  the  begin- 
ning he  hired  but  sixty-five  men  and  today  employs  five  hundred  and  fifty,  of 
whom  four  hundred  are  in  the  mills  and  one  hundred  and  fifty  in  the  logging 
camps.  At  the  beginning  his  output  was  eighty  thousand  feet  of  lumber  per  day 
and  at  the  present  the  output  is  seven  hundred  and  forty  thousand — the  largest 

output  of  lumber  on  the  Pacific  coast  controlled  by  one  firm.    His  mills  have  been 
Vol.  n— 7 


126  WASHINGTON,  WKST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

operated  day  and  night  steadily  for  eleven  years.  His  plant  is  considered  the  best 
equipped  and  the  business  the  best  organized  mill  on  the  coast.  His  employes 
remain  with  him  for  years  due  to  the  fact  that  he  pays  a  good  living  wage  and 
treats  his  men  with  fairness,  justice  and  consideration.  When  he  established  the 
business  he  had  thirty-six  acres  of  land,  which  tract  is  today  covered  by  the  yard, 
plant  and  shipping  facilities.  In  1913  he  added  thirty-live  acres,  most  of  which 
is  now  in  use.  In  March,  19 16,  the  output  was  nineteen  million  feet  of  lumber  and 
the  business  for  the  year  1916  approximated  two  million  dollars.  A  well 
organized  force  prevents  loss  of  time  and  the  best  possible  equipment  facili- 
tates the  labors  of  the  men.  He  has  installed  a  new  refuse  burner  sixty-five  feet  in 
diameter  and  one  hundred  and  five  feet  in  height.  It  is  four  times  the  size  of  the 
ordinary  burner  and  was  built  after  ideas  and  plans  furnished  by  Mr.  Blagen  and 
his  son  Frank.  He  is  also  interested  in  two  boats  used  continuously  in  handling 
lumber,  one  million  feet  of  lumber  being  loaded  on  a  boat  in  a  single  day.  At  one 
time  Mr.  Blagen  operated  the  Bucoda  Lumber  Company  but  sold  out.  It  is  said 
by  many  that  he  is  considered  the  shrewdest,  most  farsighted  and  best  business 
man  on  Grays  Harbor.  Thoroughly  just  to  all  employes,  he  makes  them  feel 
their  responsibility  and  that  upon  the  efforts  of  each  individual  the  success  of  the 
whole  partly  depends.  He  pays  the  largest  salaries  on  the  west  coast  and  it  is 
said  that  men  fight  to  work  for  him.  Not  only  does  he  give  to  his  men  excellent 
wages  but  he  encourages  them  to  build  homes  and  become  good  citizens. 

On  the  7th  of  November,  1876,  Mr.  Blagen  was  married  at  San  Francisco  to 
Miss  Hannah  Erickson,  a  native  of  Norway,  and  they  have  become  parents  of 
seven  children:  Emma,  the  wife  of  Lieutenant  John  Haile  Blackburn,  U.  S.  N., 
of  Portland ;  Walter,  who  died  in  infancy ;  Clarence  G.,  who  is  married  and  makes 
his  home  in  Hoquiam,  being  secretary  and  manager  of  the  Grays  Harbor  Lumber 
Company;  Mrs.  Florence  Staiger,  living  in  Portland;  Henry  W.,  who  is  married 
and  is  sales  manager  of  the  Grays  Harbor  Lumber  Company;  Frank  N.,  who  is 
married  and  who  is  a  mechanical  engineer  and  draftsman  and  is  in  charge  of  the 
pay  roll  of  the  Grays  Harbor  Lumber  Company;  and  Miss  Celeste,  who  is  attend- 
ing high  school.  The  sons  are  practically  in  charge  of  the  plant  and  the  father 
has  every  reason  to  be  proud  of  their  ability,  for  they  are  manifesting  the  same 
sterling  qualities  which  have  dominated  his  life  and  given  him  preeminence  as  a 
business  man  of  the  northwest. 

Mr.  Blagen  and  his  family  hold  membership  in  the  First  Baptist  church,  in 
which  he  is  trustee.  His  political  support  is  given  the  republican  party  and  in  1905 
he  was  appointed  a  member  of  the  examining  board  for  the  police  commissioners 
of  Portland  under  Senator  Lane,  who  was  then  mayor  of  the  city.  He  has  never 
been  ambitious  to  hold  public  ofifice,  however,  but  there  is  no  question  concerning 
the  welfare  and  progress  of  city,  state  or  nation  that  does  not  awaken  his  interest 
and  whatever  his  judgment  sanctions  receives  his  strong  endorsemxcnt.  One  who 
knows  him  well  said:  "Not  too  much  can  be  said  of  N.  J.  Blagen's  good  qualities 
and  his  business  methods."  He  is  a  big  man — ^big  in  the  fullest  sense  of  the  term 
— in  his  way  of  looking  at  public  questions,  in  his  relation  to  his  employes — and 
he  is  a  success  in  every  sense  of  the  word.  Inspired  by  the  stories  which  he  heard 
concerning  America  and  her  opportunities,  he  came  to  the  new  world.  He  felt 
that  the  wage  of  sixteen  dollars  per  month  which  he  received  for  farm  labor  in 
Minnesota  was  too  much,  so  much  did  it  exceed  the  wage  which  farm  hands  earned 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  127 

in  Denmark.  Industry,  energy  and  laudable  ambition  have  carried  him  forward 
and  in  his  own  progress  he  has  continually  held  out  a  helping  hand  to  others,  assist- 
ing them  to  march  forward  toward  the  goal  of  success. 


CAPTAIN  JAY  L.  OUACKENBUSH. 

Captain  Jay  L.  Ouackenbush  was  the  builder  of  the  first  building  on  Holly 
street,  Bellingham,  and  from  that  time  never  lost  faith  in  the  city  and  its  future 
greatness,  as  was  shown  by  his  earnest  efforts  to  promote  its  progress  and  his 
advocacy  of  the  building  of  the  fine  city  hall  which  is  today  one  of  the  adorn- 
ments of  the  city.  In  all  things  he  manifested  the  same  spirit  of  loyalty  and 
patriotism  which  he  displayed  when  his  service  on  southern  battlefields  during 
the  Civil  war  won  him  the  rank  of  captain. 

A  native  of  Montgomery  county.  New  York,  Captain  Quackenbush  was 
born  December  29,  1827,  and  at  an  early  age  went  to  New  York  city,  where 
he  secured  a  position  in  a  large  clothing  house,  which  he  held  until  he  reached 
the  age  of  twenty.  He  then  removed  to  Owosso,  Michigan,  and  in  that  state 
took  up  the  study  of  law,  being  admitted  to  the  bar  when  thirty  years  of  age. 
Opening  an  office  he  engaged  in  practice  in  Owosso  until  the  outbreak  of  the 
Civil  war  when  he  responded  to  the  country's  call  for  troops,  raised  a  company, 
of  which  he  was  chosen  captain  and  which  was  mustered  in  as  a  part  of  the 
Eighth  Michigan  X^olunteer  Infantry.  He  was  an  ardent  believer  in  the  preserva- 
tion of  the  Union  and  deeply  regretted  that  the  condition  of  his  health  obliged  him 
to  resign  ere  the  close  of  the  war.  Throughout  his  entire  life  he  manifested  the 
same  spirit  of  loyalty  to  his  country  that  he  displayed  when  he  went  to  the  front 
in  defense  of  the  stars  and  stripes. 

After  receiving  an  honorable  discharge  Captain  Quackenbush  resumed  the 
practice  of  law  in  Owosso,  Michigan,  where  he  remained  until  1868.  when  he 
sailed  for  California  around  Cape  Horn.  After  visiting  San  Diego  he  decided 
to  locate  there  and  returned  to  Michigan  to  complete  his  arrangements  for 
establishing  his  home  on  the  coast.  He  continued  his  residence  in  San  Diego 
until  1874,  when  he  went  to  Portland,  Oregon,  where  he  engaged  in  business 
until  1885,  when  he  removed  to  the  new  city  of  Vancouver,  British  Columbia, 
where  he  conducted  important  and  profitable  business  undertakings  until  the  big 
fire  which  completely  destroyed  the  city  in  1887.  Losing  all  his  property  in  that 
conflagration  he  then  removed  to  Whatcom,  now  Bellingham,  and  through  stren- 
uous effort  managed  to  secure  a  lot  and  thereon  erected  the  first  building  on 
Holly  street,  at  the  corner  of  Dock,  calling  the  structure  the  Holly  block.  There 
were  logs  and  stumps  all  around  and  in  fact  the  building  was  practically  in  the 
woods,  so  that  he  became  the  pioneer  in  developing  what  is  today  one  of  the 
finest  thoroughfares  of  the  city.  He  was  also  connected  with  public  interests 
in  other  ways,  for  several  times  he  served  as  a  member  of  the  city  council  of 
Sehome  and  New  Whatcom  and  at  the  time  of  the  erection  of  the  present  city 
hall  he  was  one  of  the  first  to  advocate  the  plan,  putting  forth  every  possible 
effort  to  secure  a  building  worthy  of  what  he  believed  the  city  would  be.     There 


128  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

was  no  feature  of  city  improvement  at  all  practical  that  he  did  not  support  and 
his  labors  were  far-reaching  and  beneficial. 

Captain  Quackenbush  was  married  in  1859  ^  Miss  Sarah  J.  Waite  and  they 
became  the  parents  of  a  son  Louis  B.,  and  a  daughter,  Mrs.  G.  M.  Harris. 
About  five  years  prior  to  his  demise,  which  occurred  May  26,  1906,  Captain 
Quackenbush  contracted  grip  from  which  he  never  fully  recovered  and  there- 
after he  spent  the  winter  months  in  California.  He  was  for  a  half  century  an 
exemplary  member  of  the  Masonic  fraternity,  exemplifying  in  his  life  the 
beneficent  spirit  of  the  craft  and  he  was  also  a  member  of  Washington  Com- 
mandery  of  the  Loyal  Legion.  He  was  a  man  in  whom  the  call  of  opportunity 
or  of  duty  found  ready  response  and  no  civic  need  sought  his  aid  in  vain. 


COLONEL  CHAUNCEY  WRIGHT  GRIGGS. 

What  a  man  does  and  what  he  attains  depend  largely  upon  his  opportunities 
but  the  man  well  balanced  mentally  and  physically  is  possessed  of  sufficient 
courage  to  venture  where  favoring  opportunity  is  presented  and  his  judgment 
and  even  paced  energy  generally  carry  him  forward  to  the  goal  of  success. 
This  was  illustrated  in  the  career  of  Colonel  Chauncey  Wright  Griggs,  who 
never  hesitated  to  take  a  forward  step  when  the  way  was  open  and  reached  the 
heights  not  only  of  success  but  of  almost  boundless  opportunity.  Not  seeking 
honor  but  simply  endeavoring  to  do  his  duty,  honors  were  multiplied  to  him 
and  prosperity  followed  all  his  undertakings.  Colonel  Griggs  was  born  in  Tol- 
land, Connecticut,  December  31,  1832,  and  was  a  representative  of  that  brainy, 
thrifty  New  England  stock  which  has  sent  its  representatives  to  all  parts  of  the 
country,  contributing  to  material,  intellectual  and  moral  progress  wherever  they 
have  gone.  His  father.  Captain  Chauncey  Griggs,  a  man  of  more  than  ordi- 
nary ability,  served  as  an  officer  in  the  War  of  1812  and  was  a  member  of  the 
state  legislature  of  Connecticut  for  a  number  of  years,  leaving  the  impress  of 
his  individuality  upon  the  laws  enacted  during  that  period.  Through  his  mother, 
who  bore  the  maiden  name  of  Heartie  Dimock,  Colonel  Griggs  is  connected 
with  the  Dymokes  or  Dimmocks  of  England.  The  Dimocks  of  New  England 
through  Elder  Thomas  Dimock,  an  early  settler  of  Barnstable,  Massachusetts, 
trace  their  descent  from  the  Dimocks,  who  from  the  time  of  Henry  II  to  the 
reign  of  Queen  Victoria  held  and  exercised  the  office  of  hereditary  champion  of 
the  kings  of  England  and  for  their  services  were  knighted  and  baroneted.  In 
this  country  the  Dimocks  have  always  been  worthy  and  influential  citizens  and 
were  especially  prominent  in  connection  with  the  Revolutionary  war,  a  number 
of  them  becoming  officers  in  the  Continental  army. 

Colonel  Griggs,  whose  name  introduced  this  review,  attended  the  public 
schools  of  his  native  town  to  the  age  of  seventeen  years,  when  he  went  to  Ohio, 
where  for  a  short  time  he  engaged  in  clerking  in  a  country  store,  thus  making 
his  initial  step  in  a  business  career  which  was  to  bring  him  prominence  and  suc- 
cess. He  afterward  returned  home  and  completed  his  education  in  Monson 
Academy  of  Massachusetts.  Following  his  graduation  he  took  up  the  profes- 
sion of  school  teaching  and  in  1851  returned  to  the  middle  west,  going  to  Detroit, 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  129 

Michigan,  where  he  was  employed  in  a  bank.  He  afterward  again  went  to 
Ohio,  where  he  was  connected  for  a  time  with  a  mercantile  firm.  Later  he  went 
once  more  to  Detroit,  Michigan,  where  he  entered  the  furniture  business  in 
connection  with  one  of  his  brothers.  The  year  1856  witnessed  his  removal  to 
St.  Paul,  where  he  became  a  prominent  factor  in  business  circles  as  a  general 
merchant,  as  a  contractor  and  as  a  real  estate  dealer,  his  business  interests  being 
extensive  and  important. 

At  the  outbreak  of  the  Civil  war  Colonel  Griggs  organized  a  company  for 
the  Third  Minnesota  Infantry  and  in  recognition  of  his  honorable  and  brave 
service  was  promoted  through  the  various  grades  to  that  of  colonel  and  un- 
doubtedly w^ould  have  been  breveted  general  had  he  not  been  obliged  to  resign 
in  1863  on  account  of  illness.  He  then  went  to  Chaska,  Minnesota,  where  he 
became  an  active  figure  in  business  circles  as  a  general  merchant,  as  a  brick 
manufacturer  and  as  a  dealer  in  wood.  He  also  did  contract  work  for  the 
government  and  for  railroads  and  while  thus  controlling  various  important 
business  interests  he  also  represented  his  district  in  the  state  legislature  for 
several  years,  giving  thoughtful  and  earnest  consideration  to  all  the  vital  ques- 
tions which  came  up  for  settlement.  In  1869  he  again  located  in  St.  Paul,  where 
he  engaged  in  the  coal  and  wood  trade  in  connection  with  James  J.  Hill,  the 
late  railroad  magnate  and  president  of  the  Great  Northern  Railroad.  Mr. 
Griggs  was  afterward  associated  with  General  R.  W.  Johnson  and  later  with 
A.  G.  Foster.  He  organized  the  Lehigh  Coal  &  Iron  Company,  of  which  he  was 
for  some  time  president,  but  in  1887  he  disposed  of  his  entire  interest  in  the 
fuel  business.  While  he  was  best  known  in  connection  with  the  coal  and  wood 
trade,  his  relations  along  that  line  becoming  very  extensive,  he  was  also  largely 
interested  in  many  other  business  ventures.  In  1883  he  formed  a  partnership 
under  the  name  of  Glidden,  Griggs  &  Company,  which  later  became  Griggs, 
Cooper  &  Company,  one  of  the  largest  grocery  houses  of  Minnesota.  Colonel 
Griggs  was  also  prominent  as  an  investor  in  lands,  having  handled  much  prop- 
erty in  St.  Paul  and  Minneapolis  as  well  as  throughout  Minnesota,  Dakota  and 
Montana.  In  the  future  he  will  be  best  known  as  one  of  the  millionaire  lumber- 
men on  the  Pacific  coast.  With  Henry  Hewitt,  Jr.,  he  carried  through  the  largest 
lumber  purchase  ever  made.  In  May,  1888,  these  two  men  obtained  contracts 
from  the  Northern  Pacific  Railroad  for  the  sale  of  eighty  thousand  acres  of 
land  and  timber  lying  near  Tacoma.  They  became  associated  with  other  promi- 
nent men  of  the  East  and  of  the  West  under  the  name  of  the  St.  Paul  &  Tacoma 
Lumber  Company,  of  which  Colonel  Griggs  remained  president  until  1908  and 
chairman  of  the  board  of  trustees  until  his  death  on  the  29th  of  October,  1910. 
This  company  became  one  of  the  foremost  that  has  ever  operated  in  connection 
with  the  lumber  industry  on  the  Pacific  coast.  Their  interests  were  conducted 
on  a  mammoth  scale  and  their  extensive  operations  connected  them  in  trade 
relations  with  many  sections  of  the  country.  As  a  prominent  railroad  con- 
tractor Colonel  Griggs  also  had  charge  of  and  completed  several  extensive 
branches  of  the  Northern  Pacific  Railroad,  during  which  time  he  employed 
from  fifteen  hundred  to  eighteen  hundred  men  daily. 

Notwithstanding  his  large  private  interests  Colonel  Griggs  found  time  to 
serve  the  public  officially  in  many  important  capacities.  In  politics  he  was  always 
a  strong  conservative  democrat  but  never  supported  a  corrupt  candidate  or  a 


130  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

questionable  party  measure.  He  was  a  member  of  the  house  of  representatives 
of  Minnesota  for  two  terms,  was  state  senator  for  three  terms,  was  alderman 
for  seven  terms  while  a  resident  of  St.  Paul  and  held  various  positions  of  honor 
and  trust  on  important  city  committees  and  boards.  In  1889  ^'""^  again  in  1893 
he  received  the  full  vote  of  the  democratic  members  of  the  Washington  legis- 
lature for  the  United  States  senate.  In  1892  he  was  chairman  of  the  Washing- 
ton delegation  to  the  democratic  national  convention  which  nominated  Grover 
Cleveland.  His  opinions  concerning  politics  were  those  of  the  statesman,  the 
man  of  broad  business  interests,  astute  insight,  keen  perception  and  notable 
sagacity.  His  public  spirit  was  one  of  his  most  marked  characteristics.  Unlike 
many  men  who  handle  big  business  propositions,  he  did  not  regard  politics  as 
too  trivial  for  his  attention.  In  fact  he  regarded  it  the  duty  as  well  as  the 
privilege  of  every  American  citizen  to  uphold  his  honest  convictions  by  his 
ballot  and  by  his  support  of  every  measure  which  he  deemed  beneficial  to  the 
commonwealth  and  by  opposing  with  all  his  strength  every  measure  which  he 
deemed  prejudicial. 

Colonel  Griggs  was  married  in  Ledyard,  Connecticut,  to  Miss  Martha  Ann 
Gallup,  on  the  14th  of  April,  1859,  and  they  became  the  parents  of  six  children: 
Chauncey  Milton,  a  resident  of  St.  Paul.  Minnesota ;  Herbert  S.,  who  is  now 
a  practicing  lawyer  of  Tacoma;  Heartie  Dimock,  the  wife  of  Dr.  G.  C.  Wag- 
ner of  Tacoma ;  Everett  Gallup,  a  well  known  business  man  of  Tacoma ;  Theo- 
dore Wright,  living  in  St.  Paul;  and  Anna  Billings,  the  wife  of  Dr.  T.  B.  Filton, 
of  New  York  city. 

Colonel  Griggs  had  many  traits  admirable  and  worthy  of  praise  and  among 
his  many  excellent  traits  was  his  capacity  for  friendships.  The  universality  of 
his  friendships  interprets  for  us  his  intellectual  hospitality  and  the  breadth  of' 
his  sympathy,  for  nothing  was  foreign  to  him  that  concerned  his  fellowmen  and 
in  his  life  the  broader  spirit  of  the  twentieth  century  found  expression. 


A.   P.   STOCKWELL. 


Prominent  among  those  who  have  been  actively  connected  with  lumber  and 
logging  interests  in  the  northwest  is  A.  P.  Stockwell,  of  Aberdeen,  whose  ac- 
tivities have  been  a  potent  force  in  the  business  development  and  substantia! 
upbuilding  of  his  section  of  the  state.  He  came  from  another  state  which  has 
long  figured  as  a  center  of  the  lumber  industry  of  the  country,  being  a  native 
of  Michigan,  where  his  birth  occurred  in  1864.  His  father,  Levi  L.  Stockwell, 
devoted  his  life  to  farming,  and  upon  the  old  homestead  farm  A.  P.  Stockwell  was 
reared,  with  the  usual  experiences  that  fall  to  the  farm  breed  boy,  but  in 
young  manhood  he  turned  his  attention  to  the  lumber  business,  which  he 
followed  in  Michigan  until  he  came  to  Washington  in  1890.  settling  in  Aber- 
deen. Through  all  the  intervening  period  his  interests  have  been  constantly 
growing  in  volume  and  importance  and  each  forward  step  which  he  has  made 
has  brought  him  a  broader  outlook  and  wider  opportunities.  In  1897  he  joined 
C.  E.  Burrows  in  organizing  and  incorporating  the  C.  E.  Burrows  Company, 
of  which  Mr.  Burrows  continued  as  president  until  his  death,  with  Mr.  Stock- 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  131 

well  as  manager  of  the  business.  The  latter  succeeded  to  the  presidency  upon 
the  death  of  Mr.  Burrows  in  1907  and  has  so  continued  to  the  present  time. 
The  company  established  logging  camps  and  lumber  mills  in  the  Grays  Harbor 
country.  This  company  succeeded  to  the  business  of  the  Bryden  &  Leitch  Lum- 
ber Company  and  in  1907  took  over  its  sawmills  and  other  equipment.  Of  that 
company  Mr.  Stockwell  was  president  from  the  time  of  Mr.  Burrows'  de?th 
until  1910,  when  the  mill  was  sold  to  the  Donovan  Lumber  Company. 

Many  other  important  business  concerns  have  felt  the  stimulus  and  profited 
by  rhe  cooperation  of  Mr.  Stockwell.  who  is  now  secretary  of  the  Finch  Invest- 
ment Company,  in  which  connection  he  is  active  in  the  control  of  a  most  ex- 
tensive business.  He  became  identified  with  the  Aberdeen  Timber  Company, 
which  was  incorporated  in  1902  with  C.  E.  Burrows  as  the  first  president.  He 
was  succeeded  by  William  T.  Cameron,  who  is  now  president,  with  Mr.  Stock- 
well  as  secretary  and  treasurer.  They  carried  on  a  logging  business  in  township 
21,  range  9,  Chehalis,  now  Grays  Harbor,  county.  In  1897  ^^^-  Burrows  and 
Mr.  Stockwell  purchased  the  Grays  Harbor  Boom  Company,  which  was  incor- 
porated in  1893,  with  William  Balsh  as  president,  W.  L.  Stiles,  vice  president, 
and  John  Anderson,  secretary.  Mr.  Stockwell  afterward  became  president  of 
the  company.  The  business  was  sold  in  1910  to  the  Warren  Company,  which  in 
1914  sold  out  to  H.  P.  Brown.  Mr.  Stockwell  is  managing  the  operation  of 
the  booms  on  the  Humptulips  river.  In  1900  the  Humptulips  Driving  Com- 
pany was  organized  with  Mr.  Stockwell  as  secretary  and  treasurer,  the  company 
being  formed  for  the  purpose  of  driving,  sorting  and  delivering  logs  on  the 
Humptulips  river.  In  1910  the  Humptulips  Towing  Company  was  incorporated 
by  the  Warren  Company  but  the  business  was  sold  to  H.  B.  Brown  in  1914. 
Mr.  Stockwell  acts  as  manager  of  the  business.  In  August,  1914,  the  Hump- 
tulips Logging  Company  was  incorporated  with  H.  B.  Brown,  of  San  Fran- 
cisco, as  president ;  W.  B.  Mack,  vice  president,  and  C.  A.  Pitchford,  secretary 
and  treasurer,  with  Mr.  Stockwell  as  manager  of  the  ofifices  in  Aberdeen  and  of 
the  logging  outfit  in  township  21,  range  9.  Chehalis,  now  Grays  Harbor  county. 
It  will  thus  be  seen  that  Mr.  Stockwell's  interests  are  most  important  and  exten- 
sive, bringing  him  into  close  connection  with  a  number  of  the  largest  logging 
and  lumber  interests  of  the  northwest.  He  possesses  marked  ability  as  an 
organizer  and  notable  executive  force  and  these  qualities  liave  been  salient  fea- 
tures in  his  growing  prosperity  and  have  as  well  been  important  elements  in 
the  growth  and  development  of  the  district. 

In  1896,  in  Aberdeen,  Mr.  Stockwell  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Carrie 
A.  Jones,  her  father  being  F.  E.  Jones,  who  was  a  native  of  Michigan  and  was 
there  engaged  in  the  lumber  business,  to  which  he  also  devoted  his  attention  after 
coming  to  Washington  in  1890.  His  demise  occurred  in  191 5,  when  he  had  at- 
tained the  age  of  sixty  years.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Stockwell  have  two  children,  Rich- 
ard and  Malcolm,  who  are  thirteen  and  eleven  years  of  age  respectively. 

Fraternally  Mr.  Stockwell  is  connected  with  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd 
Fellows  and  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  His  political  allegiance 
is  given  to  the  republican  party  and  in  1899  he  was  elected  to  the  legislature  from 
his  district.  He  prefers,  however,  that  his  public  duties  shall  be  performed  as  a 
private  citizen  rather  than  as  an  official  but  is  ever  ready  to  aid  in  projects  and 
movements  for  the  general  good  and  stands  loyally  at  all  times  for  those  activ- 


132  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

ities  and  interests  which  are  a  matter  of  civic  virtue  and  civic  pride.  He  has 
never  regretted  his  determination  to  become  a  resident  of  the  northwest,  for  the 
natural  resources  of  the  country  have  constituted  a  splendid  stage  for  his  activities 
and  in  the  wise  utilization  of  his  opportunities  he  has  come  to  the  front  in  connec- 
tion with  the  lumber  industry,  which  is  one  of  the  chief  sources  of  Washington's 
Avealth. 


ALEXANDER  POLSON. 

The  term  ''captains  of  industry"  came  into  existence  through  contemplation 
of  the  life  record  of  such  men  as  Alexander  Poison,  president  of  the  Poison  • 
Logging  Company  of  Hoquiam,  a  man  forceful  and  resourceful  in  planning  and 
conducting  important  business  affairs,  his  interests  being  carefully  systematized 
so  that  there  is  no  useless  expenditure  of  time,  labor  or  material,  the  results 
achieved  being  therefore  highly  satisfactory.  Mr.  Poison  was  born  in  Nova 
Scotia  in  1853,  a  son  of  Peter  and  Catherine  (McLean)  Poison,  who  were  of 
.Scotch  descent  and  birth.  They  removed  from  Scotland  to  Nova  Scotia  in 
childhood. 

It  was  in  the  schools  of  his  native  country  that  Alexander  Poison  pursued  his 
education,  and  in  1876,  when  a  young  man  of  twenty-three  years,  he  became 
imbued  with  an  unconquerable  desire  to  try  his  fortune  in  the  west,  Deadwood, 
Dakota,  becoming  his  destination.  After  three  months  there  passed,  however, 
he  made  his  way  to  Carson  City,  Nevada,  where  he  engaged  in  mining  and 
lumbering  for  three  years.  In  1879  he  made  a  trip  to  Tucson,  Arizona,  but 
after  a  few  months  started  on  horseback  for  Goldendale,  Washington,  situated 
not  far  from  the  Columbia  river.  The  entire  journey  was  accomplished  on  horse- 
back and  after  reaching  his  destination  he  secured  employment  in  the  lumber 
woods,  working  on  the  first  drive  of  logs  that  was  taken  out  for  the  construction 
of  the  Northern  Pacific  Railroad  from  the  Columbia  river  to  Montana,  its  logs 
being  floated  down  the  Yakima  into  the  Columbia  river.  In  the  winter  of  1880 
he  went  to  Olympia,  where  for  a  year  and  a  half  he  was  employed  in  logging  by 
Ames  Brown,  who  was  the  first  lumberman  of  the  territory  and  became  a  man 
of  wealth  and  prominence,  later  establishing  his  home  in  Seattle.  Mr.  Poison, 
too,  was  one  of  the  pioneer  lumbermen  of  the  state  and  it  was  he  who  brought 
the  first  steel  felling  saw  and  steel  wedges  into  Washington. 

On  leaving  Olympia  he  went  to  Shoalwater  Bay,  now  Willapa  Harbor,  and 
there  built  the  first  dam  used  in  log  driving  in  Pacific  county.  In  1882  he  became 
a  permanent  resident  of  Hoquiam  and  built  the  first  splash  dam  in  the  Hoquiam 
river  in  Chehalis.  now  Grays  Harbor,  county.  In  1884,  in  association  with  his 
brother  Robert,  he  began  logging  in  Grays  Harbor  in  a  small  way,  using  bull 
teams  to  skid  logs.  Thus  was  established  the  Poison  Brothers  Logging  Company, 
which  became  the  foremost  of  the  kind  in  the  northwest.  They  added  machinery 
and  equipment  from  time  to  time  until  they  now  operate  the  most  extensive  and 
best  equipped  logging  plant  in  the  world.  The  number  of  logs  which  are  annually 
cut  in  the  forests  and  brought  to  the  mills  is  enormous  and  the  business  has 
assumed  proportions  that  even  to  themselves  would  have  seemed  incredible  of 


ALEXANDER  POLSON 


;he  new  yoRFT^ 

PUBLIC  UBRARY 

ASTOR,    LENOX 
aLDEN  FOUND ATIOW  f 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  135 

accomplishment  at  the  beginning  of  the  undertaking.  Their  equipment  at  the 
present  time  still  includes  a  locomotive  which  is  called  Betsy  and  which  was 
brought  over  the  mountains  in  1870  by  Aines worth  &  Simpson,  who  used  it  in 
their  Spokane  yards  in  hauling  lumber.  It  was  sold  to  the  Poison  Company  in 
1894  and  is  still  in  active  service  at  the  Poison  camps,  the  engine  yet  containing 
the  original  boiler.  It  was  Alexander  Poison  who  built  the  first  successful  log 
driving  splash  dam  in  Chehalis  county.  The  brothers  still  remain  in  active  con- 
nection in  business,  with  Alexander  Poison  as  president  of  the  company  and 
Robert  Poison  as  manager.  Their  policy  has  been  a  liberal  one  toward  employes. 
They  have  always  furnished  the  best  camp  quarters  for  their  workmen.  No  use 
of  intoxicants  is  allowed,  the  men  being  encouraged  to  save  their  money  and 
build  homes.  Mr.  Poison  maintains  the  most  friendly  relations  with  all  his 
employes  and  they  know  that  they  can  count  upon  his  aid  in  an  emergency. 

Aside  from  his  connection  with  the  Poison  Logging  Company  he  is  vice 
president  of  the  Eureka  Lumber  &  Shingle  Company,  vice  president  of  the 
Bay  City  Lumber  Company,  and  vice  president  of  the  Hoquiam  Timber  Company. 
His  operations  thus  place  him  in  a  position  of  leadership  as  a  representative  of 
the  lumber  industry,  which  has  been  the  chief  source  of  Washington's  wealth, 
and  thus  he  ranks  with  the  prominent  business  men  of  the  state.  He  is  also 
interested  in  a  number  of  other  industries  in  western  Washington,  all  of  which  are 
elements  in  promoting  public  progress  and  prosperity  as  well  as  individual  success. 

He  stands  for  clean  and  honest  business  methods,  for  clfean  and  honorable 
living,  and  no  man  has  been  a  more  active  or  effective  worker  in  cleansing  the 
city  of  Hoquiam  of  its  gambling  joints  and  other  devices  that  lower  the  standard 
of  public  morals.  He  is  now  active  in  the  work  of  promoting  state-wide  prohibi- 
tion, prior  to  which  time  he  carried  on  a  movement  to  have  all  the  saloons  of 
Hoquiam  segregated  on  one  street.  He  has  served  as  a  member  of  the  city  council 
and  for  one  term  as  state  senator,  not  because  he  was  ambitious  to  hold  political 
office  but  because  he  wished  to  exercise  his  official  prerogatives  in  support  of 
measures  which  he  deemed  of  the  greatest  worth  and  value  to  the  community. 
During  the  Hay  administration  it  was  so  evident  that  corruption  existed  in  many 
of  the  departments  of  government  that  Mr.  Poison  called  for  an  investigation 
of  the  insurance  department,  the  legislature  itself  and  also  the  supreme  court, 
one  member  of  which  was  so  patently  responsible  for  irregularities  that  he 
resigned  because  of  the  proposed  investigation.  Mr.  Poison  spent  twenty  thou- 
sand dollars  of  his  own  money  to  force  the  investigation,  which  cleaned  up  and 
settled  the  question.  It  was  he  who  was  instrumental  in  securing  the  plans  for  a 
new  group  of  government  buildings,  including  the  state  capitol.  He  insisted  on 
three  architects  and  no  one  knew  whose  plans  were  accepted  until  the  decision 
was  announced,  which  eliminated  all  dickering  and  unfairness.  He  was  instru- 
mental in  compelling  the  withdrawal  of  twenty  sections  of  school  timber  land 
from  sale,  thereby  eliminating  graft  and  also  ensuring  to  the  state  school  fund 
a  handsome  sum  of  from  one  million  to  two  million  dollars.  He  was  named  on 
the  board  of  capitol  commissioners  by  Governor  Hay.  He  is  desirous  for 
Washington  to  follow  Minnesota's  plans  in  regard  to  school  lands,  which  will 
thus  take  care  of  the  taxes.  Since  1904  he  has  each  presidential  year  been  urged 
to  accept  the  position  of  delegate  to  the  republican  national  convention,  but  has 
given  way  to  other  men.     In  1916,  however,  he  was  made  a  delegate  notwith- 


136  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

standing  his  express  wish  that  another  should  accept  the  office.  From  1884  until 
1886  Mr.  Poison  served  as  the  first  assessor  of  Hoquiam. 

On  the  i8th  of  February,  1891,  Mr.  Poison  was  married  to  Miss  Ella  Arnold, 
a  native  of  Iowa  and  a  graduate  of  Iowa  College  of  Des  Moines.  Her  parents 
live  with  them  in  their  beautiful  and  spacious  home,  which  was  the  second 
residence  erected  in  Hoquiam,  built  in  1884,  the  lumber  for  the  building  being 
cut  and  sawed  in  Montesano.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Poison  have  three  children.  Frank- 
lyn  Arnold  is  a  graduate  of  the  Culver  Military  Academy  of  Indiana  and  is  now 
associated  with  the  Grays  Harbor  Door  Company  of  Hoquiam.  Charles  Stewart 
attended  Culver  Academy  and  is  now  a  senior,  class  of  1917,  in  the  University 
of  Washington  at  Seattle.  Both  he  and  his  brother  are  making  an  especial  study 
of  Spanish,  in  preparation  for  business  conditions  which  may  arise  in  South 
America.  Kathryn  Dorothy  was  graduated  from  Huntington  Hall  in  Pasadena, 
California,  and  is  now  in  school  at  Boston,  Massachusetts. 

Fraternally  Mr.  Poison  is  a  prominent  Mason,  having  taken  the  degrees  of 
the  York  and  Scottish  Rites,  while  with  the  Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine  he  has 
crossed  the  sands  of  the  desert.  He  has  passed  through  all  the  chairs  in  the  Odd 
Fellows  lodge  and  he  belongs  to  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  the  Benevolent 
Protective  Order  of  Elks.  His  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican 
party  and  he  is  of  that  bigness  of  mind  which  places  the  public  welfare  before 
partisanship  and  the  general  good  before  personal  aggrandizement.  He  believes 
that  every  individual  should  have  his  opportunity.  No  man  has  been  quicker  to 
recognize  the  rights  of  others  or  more  alert  in  assuming  the  duties  and  responsi- 
bilities which  rest  upon  him.  It  is  this  which  has  made  him  counselor,  advisor 
and  friend  to  his  workmen,  exemplifying  in  his  career  the  principle  of  justice, 
and  the  confidence  and  goodwill  entertained  for  him  are  the  spontaneous  offerings 
of  people  who  recognize  that  he  judges  everything  from  a  broad  standard  and 
looks  at  every  question  with  a  wide  vision,  keeping  his  mind  at  all  times  receptive 
toward  those  influences  which  will  work  for  justice  and  right. 


DAVID  THOMAS  DENNY. 

David  Thomas  Denny  was  the  first  of  the  name  to  set  foot  on  Puget  Sound, 
landing  at  Duwamish  Head  on  the  25th  of  September,  185 1.  As  one  of  the  early 
residents  of  Seattle  he  exercised  a  determining  influence  on  the  development  of 
the  city  and  the  northwest  along  many  diverse  lines  of  endeavor.  He  was  a 
conspicuous  figure  not  only  in  commercial,  financial  and  political  circles  but  also 
in  the  work  of  the  church  and  in  movements  seeking  the  promotion  of  the  artistic 
and  cultured  interests  of  the  city.  He  was  a  member  of  a  family  of  which  repre- 
sentatives for  generations  had  been  influential  and  respected  in  their  communities 
and  he  manifested  those  intellectual  and  moral  qualities  which  combine  to  form 
the  highest  type  of  manhood. 

Mr.  Denny  was  born  on  the  17th  of  March,  1832,  in  Putnam  county,  Indiana, 
a  son  of  John  and  Sally  (Wilson)  Denny.  The  ancestry  has  been  traced  back  to 
representatives  of  the  name  who  emigrated  from  England  to  Scotland  and  thence 
to  Ireland,  whence  David  and  Margaret  Denny,  the  American  progenitors  of  the 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  137 

family,  crossed  the  Atlantic  early  in  the  eighteenth  century  and  settled  in  Berks 
county,  Pennsylvania.  Their  son,  Robert,  who  was  born  in  1753,  married  Miss 
Rachel  Thomas,  and  they  were  the  parents  of  John,  the  father  of  our  subject, 
who  was  born  May  4,  1793,  near  Lexington,  Kentucky.  He  fought  in  the  War 
of  1812  and  was  a  pioneer  of  Indiana,  Illinois  and  Oregon.  He  served  in  the 
Illinois  state  legislature  and  was  personally  acquainted  with  Lincoln,  Yates  and 
Trumbull.  He  was  an  orator  of  unusual  power  and  was  active  in  a  number  of 
reform  movements  which  in  that  day  were  unpopular,  working  in  behalf  of  the 
abolition  of  slavery,  the  prohibition  cause  and  woman's  suffrage.  In  1851  he 
served  as  captain  of  a  company  of  emigrants  which  crossed  the  plains  to  Oregon. 
The  mother  of  our  subject  passed  away  'in  1841,  when  he  was  but  nine  years 
of  age,  and  throughout  his  life  he  carried  with  him  the  memory  of  her  affection 
and  Christian  character.  His  father  married  again,  choosing  Sarah  (Latimer) 
Boren,  the  widow  of  Richard  Freeman  Boren,  a  Baptist  preacher,  for  his  second 
wife.  She  was  a  woman  of  many  noble  qualities  and  performed  the  many  duties 
that  fell  to  the  lot  of  the  pioneer  wives  and  mothers.  Through  a  long  widow- 
hood she  had  reared  and  educated  her  children,  living  on  her  own  land  in  Illinois 
and  with  her  own  hands  spun  and  wove  excellent  linen  and  woolen  cloth  which 
was  used  in  making  clothing  for  the  family.  Very  full  genealogical  tables  of  the 
Denny  family  may  be  found  in  "Genealogica  et  Fleraldica"  and  in  "The  Denny 
Family  in  England  and  America." 

David  T.  Denny  received  only  the  usual  educational  advantages  of  the  boy 
reared  on  the  western  frontier  but  throughout  life  he  never  ceased  to  study  men 
and  affairs  and  as  he  had  a  keen  and  vigorous  mind  he  became  not  only  pos- 
sessed of  great  stores  of  knowledge  which  he  had  attained  at  first  hand,  but  also 
of  much  practical  wisdom  and  of  deep  understanding  of  the  motives  of  human 
conduct.  He  found  excellent  training  in  solving  the  diverse  and  exacting  problems 
that  arose  in  the  development  of  civilization  in  the  northwest,  a  development 
to  which  he  contributed  much.  When  a  youth  of  seventeen  years  he  clerked 
in  a  village  store  in  Knoxville,  Illinois,  and  when  nineteen  years  of  age  he  joined 
his  father's  company,  driving  a  four-horse  team  across  the  plains  to  Oregon.  He 
found  his  first  remunerative  employment  on  Puget  Sound  in  cutting  timber  for 
export  and  later  took  up  diversified  farming  and  cattle  raising  on  a  donation  claim. 
He  also  cultivated  a  rich  valley  farm,  known  as  the  Collins'  farm,  on  the  Duma- 
wish  river,  in  the  '60s  and  '70s.  During  the  latter  decade  he  began  to  acquire 
wild  lands,  realizing  something  of  the  marvelous  future  of  the  northwest.  As  the 
years  passed  his  interests  multiplied  and  grew  in  importance  until  he  was  recog- 
nized as  one  of  the  foremost  men  in  the  city.  He  platted  seven  additions  to 
Seattle ;  was  interested  in  an  important  sawmill ;  built  and  equipped  the  electric 
road  to  Ravenna  Park;  was  heavily  interested  in  electric  and  cable  street  rail- 
ways and  was  president  of  the  consolidated  system ;  was  a  large  stockholder  in 
a  number  of  banks;  was  president  of  the  water  company  and  was  also  chief 
executive  of  several  large  mining  companies  and  of  other  corporations. 

He  was  also  a  leader  in  public  affairs  and  in  the  early  '60s  served  as  county 
treasurer,  while  he  also  held  the  offices  of  probate  judge  and  of  county  com- 
missioner. He  served  on  the  city  council,  was  trustee  of  the  town  of  Seattle  in 
1872,  was  for  twelve  years  school  director  of  district  No.  i  of  Seattle,  and 
was  a  regent  of  the  Territorial  University.     During  his  early  manhood  he  sup- 


138  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

ported  the  republican  party  but  as  he  became  more  and  more  impressed  with  the 
fact  that  many  great  evils  can  be  traced  to  the  liquor  traffic  as  an  underlying  cause 
he  became  correspondingly  more  interested  in  the  work  of  the  prohibition  party 
and  during  the  later  years  of  his  life  supported  it  at  the  polls.  In  1867  he  became 
a  charter  member  of  the  first  lodge  of  the  Independent  Order  of  Good  Templars 
organized  in  Seattle  and  in  the  same  year  he  was  elected  its  chaplain.  He  was 
a  pioneer  advocate  of  woman's  suffrage,  having  used  his  influence  to  secure  the 
granting  of  equal  political  rights  from  the  year  1881  until  his  demise.  During 
the  Civil  war  he  was  ardent  in  his  support  of  the  Union  cause  and  was  a  member 
of  the  famous  Union  League. 

The  principles  which  guided  his  conduct  in  his  relations  with  his  fellowmen 
were  those  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church,  and  his  religious  faith  w'as  the 
source  of  the  moral  power  which  made  his  life  such  a  marked  force  for  good 
in  his  city.  From  i860  to  1886  he  was  a  member  of  the  First  Methodist  Episcopal 
church  and  subsequently  held  membership  in  the  Batterv'  Methodist  Episcopal 
church  and  the  Trinity  Methodist  Episcopal  church  of  Seattle.  He  contributed 
generously  to  the  various  lines  of  church  work  and  also  gave  freely  of  his  time 
when,  as  was  often  the  case,  his  advice  was  sought  on  some  important  question 
concerning  church  affairs.  He  was  not  only  a  tower  of  strength  to  the  church 
to  which  he  belonged  but  was  influential  in  the  state  and  national  organizations 
and  served  as  a  delegate  to  the  general  conference  in  1888  and  also  in  1892. 

During  the  early  years  of  his  residence  in  the  northwest  there  were  not  only 
the  hardships  and  privations  of  pioneer  life  to  be  endured  but  its  dangers  were 
also  encountered.  In  1855  and  1856  there  w'as  serious  Indian  trouble  and  Mr. 
Denny  performed  his  share  of  the  task  of  protecting  the  white  settlements  from 
the  attacks  of  the  red  men.  He  was  a  member  of  Company  C  of  the  volunteer 
army  raised  for  defense  and  was  stationed  with  his  command  about  a  mile  from 
Seattle  when  Lieutenant  Slaughter  and  several  of  his  men  were  killed  by  the 
Indians.  Later,  on  the  26th  of  Januar}%  1856,  when  the  red  men  attacked  the 
town,  he  stood  guard  at  the  door  of  Fort  Decatur  and  throughout  the  whole  of 
that  troublous  time  he  proved  himself  a  man  of  intrepid  courage.  During 
that  period  in  the  northwest  each  family  had  to  largely  depend  upon  its  own 
resources  and  his  skill  as  a  marksman  proved  of  great  practical  value  as  it  meant 
that  the  family  would  be  supplied  with  plenty  of  food,  as  game  of  all  kinds,  includ- 
ing bear,  deer  and  grouse,  was  plentiful.  Throughout  his  life  he  retained  his  love 
for  the  outdoor  world  and  found  much  needed  recreation  in  hunting,  fishing  and 
exploring.  It  was  he  who  killed  the  last  antlered  elk  shot  in  the  vicinity  of 
Seattle. 

Mr.  Denny  was  married  on  the  23d  of  January,  1853,  in  the  cabin  of  A.  A. 
Denny,  on  Elliott  bay,  to  Miss  Louisa  Boren,  a  daughter  of  Richard  Freeman 
and  Sarah  Boren.  She  was  born  in  White  county,  Illinois,  on  the  ist  of  June, 
1827,  and  in  1851  crossed  the  plains  to  Oregon  territor}-,  reaching  Alki  Point  on 
the  13th  of  November,  that  year.  She  was  well  educated  and  before  her  marriage 
followed  the  profession  of  teaching.  She  proved  a  true  helpmate,  working  side 
by  side  with  her  husband  with  hand,  heart  and  brain  and  assisting  him  mate- 
rially by  her  energy  and  thrift  in  building  up  a  considerable  fortune.  As  a 
mother  she  was  most  devoted  and  gave  of  herself  unsparingly  in  the  rearing  and 
educating  of  her  children.     Although  her  first  interest  was  always  in  her  home 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  139 

she  found  time  to  do  much  toward  bringing  about  many  needed  reforms  in  her 
community  and  was  a  stanch  and  effective  advocate  of  the  prohibition  cause  and 
the  cause  of  woman's  suffrage.  In  her  church  she  was  an  active  worker  and  all 
who  came  in  contact  with  her  testified  to  the  sincerity  of  her  Christianity,  which 
found  constant  expression  in  her  daily  life.  She  possessed  the  energy  that  made 
her  thoughts  deeds  and  gave  her  ideals  expression  in  action. 

To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Denny  were  born  eight  children,  as  follows:  Emily  Inez; 
Madge  Decatur,  who  was  born  in  Fort  Decatur  on  the  i6th  of  March,  1856; 
Abbie  L.,  the  wife  of  Edward  L.  Lindsey;  John  B.,  who  married  Carrie  V. 
Palmer  and  following  her  demise  was  united  in  marriage  to  C.  Zeo  Crysler; 
Anna  L. ;  D.  Thomas,  who  married  Nellie  E.  Graham ;  Jonathan,  twin  to  D. 
Thomas,  who  died  on  the  day  of  his  birth;  and  Victor  W.  S.,  who  married  Lillie 
J.  Frankland. 

Although  intensely  practical  and  a  leader  in  commercial,  industrial  and  financial 
circles,  Mr.  Denny  appreciated  and  thoroughly  enjoyed  art,  poetry,  music  and 
oratory  and  did  all  in  his  power  to  further  the  development  of  the  city  along  those 
lines.  He  recognized  that  the  law  of  life  is  change  and  progress  and  as  the 
frontier  settlement  gradually  became  a  metropolitan  city  he  adapted  his  plans 
to  the  new  conditions  and  retained  his  position  of  leadership.  As  the  years 
passed  he  grew  in  the  power  of  insight,  of  prompt  and  wise  decision  and  of 
achievement.  Although  he  took  justifiable  pride  in  his  material  success  and 
in  the  honor  which  was  accorded  him  because  of  his  acknowledged  ability  he 
perhaps  prized  even  more  highly  his  reputation  for  the  strictest  honesty  and 
integrity.  His  sobriquet  was  "Honest  Dave,"  which  indicates  much  of  the  con- 
fidence and  the  warm  regard  in  which  he  was  held  by  those  who  were  associated 
with  him.  Although  his  work  is  done  his  influence  is  still  potent  and  his  place  in 
the  history  of  Seattle  is  assured. 

David  Thomas  Denny  was  born  March  17,  1832,  in  Illinois;  died  November 
25,  1903,  in  Seattle. 

Louisa  Boren  was  born  June  i,  1827.  They  were  married  in  Seattle, 
January  23,   1853. 

The  following  is  a  list  of  their  children,  all  born  in  Seattle: 

Emily  Inez,  December  23,  1853;  Madge  D.,  born  March  16,  1856;  died 
January  17,  1889;  Abbie  L.,  born  August  28,  1858;  John  B.,  born  January  30, 
1862;  died  June  25,  1913;  Anna  L.,  born  November  26,  1864;  died  May  5, 
1888;  D.  Thomas  and  Jonathan,  May  6,  1867;  Jonathan  died  May  6,  1867; 
Victor  W.  S.  Denny,  August  9,  1869. 

Abbie  L.  Denny  and  Edward  L.  Lindsley  were  married  in  Seattle,  May  3, 
1877.     Their  children  were  all  born  in  Seattle: 

Lawrence  D.  Lindsley,  Mabel  M.  Lindsley,  Winola  Lindsley,  Irene  Lindsley, 
Norman  David  Lindsley. 

John  B.  Denny  and  Carrie  V.  Palmer  were  married  in  Seattle,  January  13, 
1887.     Their  children  were  all  born  in  Seattle. 

E.  Harold,  September  11,  1887;  Anne  L.,  born  July  13,  1890. 

John  B.  Denny  and  C.  M.  Crysler  were  also  married. 

Helen  T.,  born  December  9,  1894,  was  the  only  child  of  this  marriage. 

D.  Thomas  Denny  and  Nellie  E.  Graham  were  married  in  1893.  Their 
children  were  all  born  in  Seattle: 


140  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

Louisa  I.,  November  19,  1894;  \^^  Claude,  August  6,  1897;  D.  Thomas,  Jr., 
March  5,  1898. 

Victor  Winfield  Scott  Denny  and  Lilhe  J.  Frankland  were  married  in 
Seattle  in  August,  1894.     Their  children  were  all  bom  in  Seattle: 

Madge  Decatur,  October  18,  1895;  Elizabeth  Crocker,  December  25,  1896; 
Victor  W.  S.,  Jr.,  February  5,  1903. 


JACOB  HUNSAKER. 


For  about  half  a  century  Jacob  Hunsaker  of  Everett  has  engaged  in  the  real 
estate  business  and  has  devoted  his  attention  exclusively  to  the  general  real  estate 
and  loan  business  for  twenty-five  years.  He  comes  of  a  family  of  Swiss  origin, 
its  founder  in  America  being  Jacob  Hunsaker.  His  grandfather,  also  named 
Jacob,  was  a  representative  of  the  first  generation  born  in  the  new  world  and  his 
birth  occurred  in  Pennsylvania,  but  he  removed  to  Illinois  prior  to  the  birth  of 
his  son,  Jacob  T.  Hunsaker,  who  on  arriving  at  years  of  maturity,  married  Emily 
Collins,  a  native  of  Kentucky. 

The  birth  of  Jacob  Hunsaker,  whose  name  introduces  this  review,  occurred 
in  Adams  county,  Illinois,  January  22.  1845,  and  it  was  during  the  season  of 
1846  that  his  parents  crossed  the  plains,  arriving  in  Oregon  City  in  the  fall  of 
that  year,  so  that  he  has  passed  the  seventieth  anniversary  of  the  beginning  of 
his  connection  with  the  northwest.  Early  in  1847  the  family  became  residents 
of  Clarke  county,  then  Oregon  territory,  now  Washington  state,  and  during 
his  youthful  days  Jacob  Hunsaker,  now  of  Everett,  became  familiar  with  all  of 
the  conditions,  experiences  and  hardships  of  pioneer  life.  One  of  the  strongest 
recollections  of  his  boyhood  concerned  the  hanging  in  1850  of  the  five  Cayuse  In- 
dians who  had  been  convicted  of  participating  in  the  W^hitman  massacre  of  No- 
vember 29,  1847.  His  father  was  on  the  jury  that  convicted  the  Indians  and 
in  some  way  the  son  was  permitted  to  see  the  execution,  which  occurred  near 
Dr.  McLoughlin's  old  flour  mill  at  the  falls  of  the  Willamette.  It  was  an  awful 
scene  for  a  child  of  five  to  look  upon  and  for  more  than  three  score  years 
it  has  remained  burned  in  his  memory.  There  are  many  other  incidents  of  pioneer 
life  that  are  equally  vivid  in  his  mind  and  his  reminiscences  of  the  early  days 
are  most  interesting. 

In  early  manhood  Mr.  Hunsaker  took  up  the  occupation  of  farmnig  but 
long  ago  began  dealing  in  real  estate  and  for  fifty  years  has  handled  property  to  a 
greater  or  less  extent.  Finding  in  this  a  profitable  field,  he  concentrated  his  ener- 
gies thereon  and  for  a  quarter  of  a  century  has  given  his  attention  exclusively 
to  the  general  real  estate  and  loan  business. 

It  was  at  Chambers  Prairie,  Washington,  on  the  ist  of  May,  1873,  that  Mr. 
Hunsaker  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Elizabeth  Chambers,  a  daughter  of  An- 
drew J.  and  Margaret  (White)  Chambers,  the  former  a  native  of  Kentucky  and 
the  latter  of  Indiana.  The  marriage  was  celebrated  in  her  father's  old  home, 
which  is  still  standing,  as  are  the  stables  which  served  as  a  stockade  during  the 
Indian  troubles,  housing  from  seventy-five  to  one  hundred  persons.  To  Mr.  and 
Mrs.   Hunsaker  have  been  born   four  children:   Lloyd,   now   living  in   Everett; 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  141 

Hallie,  a  resident  of  Everett;  Mrs.  Cassie  Chloe  Chambers,  of  Cashmere,  now- 
deceased;  and  Margaret,  living  in  Everett.  Mrs.  Hunsaker  is  a  Hfelong  resi- 
dent of  Washington,  her  birth  having  occurred  on  Chambers  Prairie,  November 
20,  1854.  She  was  therefore  only  about  a  year  old  at  the  time  of  the  Indian 
war  of  1855-6.  The  scattered  settlers  in  various  localities  built  blockhouses  and 
stockades  in  central  locations  for  the  protection  of  their  families  against  the 
Indians,  and  two  such  blockhouses  and  a  stockade  were  built  on  her  father's 
place.  James  McAllister  was  killed  by  the  Indians  and  within  twenty  hours  thirty 
families  had  gathered  in  the  stockade  that  was  built  of  fir  logs  ten  to  twelve 
inches  in  diameter  and  sixteen  feet  in  height.  The  inclosed  area,  about  one  hun- 
dred feet  square,  included  the  barn,  whose  leaning  sheds  were  turned  into  kitch- 
ens. In  all,  thirty-two  families  and  twenty-four  single  men  found  refuge  in  that 
stockade.  The  blockhouses  and  stockades  remained  standing  for  many  years. 
Mrs.  Hunsaker  says :  "In  one  of  them  that  stood  where  an  immense  locust 
tree  now  stands,  near  the  old  farm  house,  myself  and  young  sisters  gathered 
and  played.  The  old  barn  and  farm  house  are  still  standing,  but  the  last  vestige 
of  the  stockade  and  blockhouses  disappeared  many  years  ago." 

Mr.  Hunsaker  has  participated  largely  in  the  public  life  of  the  territory  and 
state.  Skamania  county  elected  him  to  the  office  of  assessor  but  he  refused  to 
qualify.  However,  he  served  on  the  board  of  commissioners  of  Klickitat  county 
for  four  years  and  he  represented  his  district,  comprising  Klickitat  and  Skam- 
ania counties,  in  the  first  state  senate  and  also  was  sent  as  representative  to  the 
lower  house  of  the  state  legislature  from  Klickitat  county.  He  dates  his  resi- 
dence in  Everett  from  1892  and  in  the  year  1895  was  elected  mayor  of  the  city 
and  in  1905  while  on  a  business  trip  he  was  again  nominated  and  elected  mayor 
of  Everett.  For  five  terms  he  has  been  city  treasurer.  His  political  allegiance 
has  always  been  given  to  the  republican  party,  which  has  found  in  him  a  stalwart 
advocate.  He  cooperates  in  efforts  for  the  benefit  of  his  city  through  member- 
ship in  the  Everett  Commercial  Club  and  in  1901  he  was  made  a  Mason  in  the 
blue  lodge  of  Everett,  since  which  time  he  has  been  a  loyal  adherent  of  the 
craft,  faithfully  observing  its  teachings  and  exemplifying  in  his  life  its  beneficent 
spirit.  No  history  of  the  state  and  its  pioneer  development  would  be  com- 
plete without  mention  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hunsaker,  who  for  so  many  years  have 
been  most  honored  and  respected  residents  of  the  state. 


LLEWELLYN   T.    SEAVEY.   M.   D. 


Dr.  Llewellyn  T.  Seavey,  a  representative  of  the  United  States  public  health 
service  and  actively  engaged  in  the  practice  of  medicine  and  surgery  at  Port 
Townsend,  was  born  in  San  Francisco  county,  California,  November  27,  1856,  a 
son  of  James  and  Julia  A.  (Carle)  Seavey.  The  parents  were  natives  of  Maine 
but  in  1856  became  residents  of  California.  After  a  short  period  there  passed 
they  removed  to  Port  Ludlow,  Washington,  in  1856  and  the  father  there  became 
bookkeeper  for  the  Ludlow  Sawmill  Company,  with  which  he  was  connected  for 
four  years.  He  next  removed  to  Port  Townsend,  where  he  engaged  in  mer- 
chandising in  connection  with  L.  B.  Hastings  and  for  four  or  five  years  was  in 


142  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

business  at  that  point.  Since  then  he  has  been  county  auditor  for  eighteen  or 
twenty  years,  has  been  postmaster  and  clerk  of  the  third  judicial  district  court 
of  the  territory  of  Washington  all  at  one  time.  He  made  a  most  excellent 
record  in  office  by  the  fidelity  and  capability  with  which  he  discharged  his  duties 
and  after  his  retirement  he  entered  the  abstract  business,  in  which  he  remained 
for  five  years.  Since  then  he  has  lived  retired  and  has  now  reached  the 
notable  old  age  of  ninety-one  years.  His  wife  died  in  Port  Townsend,  May  31, 
1902,  at  the  age  of  seventy-five  years.  In  their  family  were  three  children :  Wil- 
liam S. ;  Mrs.  Lela  R.  Bartlett ;  and  Dr.  Seavey,  who  was  the  second.  All  are 
residents  of  Port  Townsend. 

In  his  boyhood  days  Dr.  Seavey  attended  school  in  Port  Townsend  and  in 
San  Francisco  and  was  also  a  student  in  Bishop  Scott's  grammar  school  at  Port- 
land, Oregon.  He  afterward  studied  medicine  with  Dr.  G.  V.  Calhoun,  of  Seat- 
tle, for  a  year  and  later  entered  the  medical  department  of  the  University  of 
California,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  1878.  He  began  practice  in  San 
Francisco,  where  he  remained  for  four  months  in  the  capacity  of  police  sur- 
geon, and  for  one  year  he  was  surgeon  with  the  Pacific  Mail  Steamship  Com- 
pany. He  afterward  returned  to  Port  Townsend,  where  he  has  since  been  in 
active  practice.  For  the  past  sixteen  years  he  has  been  connected  with  the  United 
States  public  health  service  in  the  quarantine  department.  He  is  one  of  Wash- 
ington's best  known  physicians  and  surgeons  and  has  a  wide  practice  in  his 
part  of  the  state,  his  pronounced  ability  and  conscientious  performance  of  his 
duty  winning  for  him  a  liberal  and  constantly  growing  patronage. 

On  the  24th  of  November,  1894,  in  Port  Townsend,  Dr.  Seavey  was  married 
to  Miss  Marguritte  Nolan  and  they  have  become  parents  of  four  children : 
Morris  C,  the  eldest,  born  in  Port  Townsend  in  1895,  spent  one  year  in  the 
University  of  Washington  and  is  now  with  the  state  militia  at  Calexico,  Califor- 
nia;  Esther  M.,  born  in  Port  Townsend  in  1896,  is  a  graduate  of  the  preparatory 
department  of  the  Washington  State  College;  Grace  C,  born  in  1898,  is  attend- 
ing the  Port  Townsend  high  school,  and  Ruth  M..  born  in  1904,  is  also  in 
school. 

Dr.  Seavey  votes  with  the  republican  party,  which  he  has  always  endorsed 
since  age  conferred  upon  him  the  right  of  franchise.  He  is  a  past  master  of  the 
Masonic  lodge  of  Port  Townsend  and  a  worthy  exemplar  of  the  craft.  His  has 
been  a  well  spent  life  fraught  with  usefulness  and  good  work,  and  along  pro- 
fessional and  other  lines  his  hand  has  been  continually  outreaching  to  aid  his  fel- 
lowmen. 


ALEX  McCASKILL. 


Every  section  of  the  world  has  contributed  to  the  citizenship  of  Washington, 
but  Canada  in  particular  has  furnished  a  large  quota  of  substantial  and  repre- 
sentative business  men  who  have  contributed  much  to  the  development  and  up- 
building of  this  section  of  the  country.  Among  the  number  is  Alex  McCaskill, 
who  was  born  in  Glengarry  county,  Ontario,  May  2,  1859,  ^  son  of  Malcolm  and 
Mary    (Urquhart)    McCaskill.     The   McCaskill   family  came  to   America   from 


ALEX  McCASKILL 


THE   NEW  YORK 
PUBLIC  LIBRARY 


ASTOR,    LENOX 
TIi,DE^^   FOUNDATION 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  145 

Scotland  at  an  early  day  before  the  Revolutionary  war  and  made  their  home  in 
Virginia,  whence  a  removal  was  made  to  Canada  by  the  branch  of  the  family  to 
which  Alex  McCaskill  belongs.  As  a  lad  he  worked  in  the  timber  and  learned 
logging,  and  when  a  young  man  he  made  trips  as  scout  for  a  party  who  wished 
to  prospect  the  northwest  country.  They  started  from  Lake  Superior  northward 
on  foot  to  Hudson  Bay,  and  from  York  on  Hudson  Bay  they  proceeded  north- 
west and  eventually  made  their  way  to  the  Peace  River  country,  at  times  making 
side  excursions  into  different  sections  in  order  to  gain  a  knowledge  of  the  country 
and  its  resources.  Next  they  went  south  to  Fort  Edmonton  and  afterward  to 
Brandon,  and  in  that  year  Mr.  McCaskill  walked  nearly  eight  thousand  miles. 

It  was  in  1877  that  he  came  to  the  United  States,  settling  near  Tawas,  Mich- 
igan, and  some  time  afterward  he  removed  to  Wisconsin  and  later  to  Minnesota. 
For  several  years  he  remained  in  Minnesota  and  in  North  Dakota  and  met  pioneer 
experiences  in  all  the  district  from  the  Red  River  west.  In  1886  he  crossed  the 
northern  tier  of  states  to  Seattle,  where  he  was  engaged  in  the  timber  business 
until  1889,  when  he  removed  to  Whatcom,  now  Bellingham.  He  there  graded 
country  roads  and  also  many  of  Bellingham's  principal  thoroughfares,  including 
Dock  and  Commercial  streets.  He  worked  on  roads,  streets  and  buildings  and 
he  also  assisted  in  building  the  Northern  Pacific  Railroad  over  the  mountains, 
occupying  the  position  of  foreman  with  a  force  of  workmen.  He  was  also  a  sub- 
contractor in  connection  with  the  construction  of  the  railroad.  In  1898  he  left 
Bellingham  for  Alaska,  where  he  spent  four  years  as  superintendent  of  bridges 
and  buildings  for  the  White  Pass  &  Yukon  Railroad.  He  then  returned  to 
Washington  and  engaged  in  shingle  making  in  Skagit  county,  building  two  shingle 
mills  and  a  small  sawmill,  in  which  business  he  continued  until  March,  191 1.  At 
that  date  he  arrived  in  South  Bend  and  began  logging  on  his  own  account  in  the 
Nema  country  of  Washington,  his  work  proving  very  profitable.  He  took  a 
contract  to  clear  away  the  forest  and  build  and  grade  the  road  from  South 
Bend  to  Nema,  a  distance  of  about  twenty  miles,  at  a  cost  of  one  hundred  and 
twenty  thousand  dollars,  agreeing  to  finish  the  work  in  a  year.  He  completed 
the  task  in  a  little  less  time,  his  being  one  of  only  a  few  contracts  with  the  county 
which  were  completed  within  the  specified  time.  This  road  became  the  main 
thoroughare  and  is  now  a  part  of  the  National  Park  Highway.  While  engaged  in 
the  construction  of  that  road  Mr.  McCaskill  sold  his  logging  interests.  He  after- 
ward formed  the  Nema  Improvement  Company,  which  purchased  lands  and  stock 
and  also  bought  the  McGee  shingle  mill,  of  which  he  became  president  and 
manager,  with  E.  T.  Nobles  as  secretary  and  treasurer.  The  mill  had  a  capacity 
of  seventy-five  thousand  shingles,  which  the  new  company  increased  to  one  hun- 
dred and  forty  thousand.  They  put  in  dry  kilns  and  employed  twenty  men,  theirs 
being  one  of  the  important  industries  of  that  character  in  the  Willapa  Harbor 
district.  In  deciding  on  a  name  for  the  company,  Mr.  McCaskill  called  attention 
to  the  fact  that  he  had  been  the  organizer  of  numerous  companies  but  that  this 
was  to  be  absolutely  his  last  one,  so  he  named  it  Nema,  which  is  Amen  spelled 
backward.  In  19 16  Mr.  McCaskill  withdrew  from  the  Nema  Company  and  in 
the  settlement  of  his  aflfairs  he  secured  from  the  company  two  hundred  acres 
of  land,  the  cattle,  horses  and  implements  and  also  obtained  as  individual  property 
the   shingle   mill   which   he   is   now   operating.      Mr.   McCaskill   has   had  broad 

experience  in  connection  with  shingle  manufacturing  and  carefully  and  wisely 
Vol.  n— 8 


146  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

directs  his  interests  so  that  substantial  results  accrue.  He  also  developed  a  stock 
farm  on  the  harbor  of  several  hundred  acres,  which  he  has  greatly  improved, 
adding  all  modern  accessories  and  equipments.  In  a  word,  he  is  a  forceful  and 
resourceful  business  man,  alert  to  his  opportunities  and  at  all  times  enterprising 
and  progressive.  After  selling  his  logging  interests  he  bought  a  large  tract  of 
one  thousand  acres  of  agricultural  land  eighteen  miles  down  the  bay  from  South 
Bend,  which  he  has  greatly  improved  and  still  retains.  He  built  a  dike  three  miles 
long,  improved  the  place  with  commodious  buildings  and  uses  it  extensively  for 
raising  hay  and  cattle. 

In  1889  Mr.  McCaskill  was  married  in  Bellingham  to  ]\Iiss  Lauretta  Whittaker, 
a  representative  of  one  of  the  first  families  of  Whatcom.  Her  parents,  Abraham 
and  Emma  (Lamb)  Whittaker,  were  both  natives  of  Manchester,  England,  and 
soon  after  their  marriage  crossed  the  Atlantic  to  Pennsylvania.  They  afterward 
removed  to  Missouri  and  later  to  Evanston,  Wyoming,  whence  they  drove  over 
the  old  Oregon  trail  to  Olympia,  Washington,  arriving  in  the  early  '70s.  They 
later  removed  to  Bellingham,  where  both  died  in  February,  191 7.  They  were 
the  parents  of  six  daughters  and  a  son,  all  of  whom  are  living.  Mrs.  McCaskill 
was  educated  in  Olympia  and  is  a  woman  of  marked  intelligence,  being  a  close 
student  of  the  Bible  and  of  general  literature.  She  possesses  much  natural  artistic 
skill  and  does  fine  work  in  crayons.  She  also  possesses  marked  talent  for  music 
and  is  a  leader  in  those  movements  in  which  women  are  most  interested  in 
South  Bend.  Both  Mr.  and  Mrs.  McCaskill  are  widely  known  through  western 
Washington,  where  they  have  an  extensive  circle  of  friends.  Their  only  child 
died  in  infancy.  Mr.  McCaskill  has  long  been  a  member  of  the  Knights  of 
Pythias  and  in  Masonry  he  has  attained  the  thirty-second  degree  of  the  Scottish 
Rite.  He  stands  six  feet  two  inches  in  height,  is  of  robust  physique  and  has  never 
been  ill  a  day  from  any  disease.  He  inherited  great  strength  and  vitality,  which 
he  has  never  lessened  through  the  use  of  intoxicants.  He  is  a  man  of  strong 
character,  of  firm  purpose  and  of  high  ideals.  Both  as  a  man  and  citizen  he 
occupies  an  enviable  position  in  public  regard  and  his  life  work  has  been  crowned 
with  successful  achievement,  making  him  today  one  of  the  prosperous  residents 
of  his  section  of  the  state. 


WILLIAM  B.  RITCHIE. 

For  almost  three  decades  William  B.  Ritchie  has  been  a  resident  of  Port 
Angeles  and  the  active  part  which  he  has  taken  in  the  professional,  political, 
fraternal  and  social  interests  of  the  community  ranks  him  with  its  leading  and 
prominent  citizens,  while  the  course  he  has  ever  followed  has  won  him  the  honor 
and  high  regard  of  all  with  whom  he  has  been  brought  in  contact.  In  the  midst 
of  an  active  professional  career  as  a  member  of  the  Port  Angeles  bar  he  has 
ever  found  time  to  cooperate  in  those  movements  which  have  sought  to  make 
this  a  larger  and  a  better  city,  in  all  those  things  which  constitute  civic  virtue 
and  civic  pride.  He  was  born  in  Ayrshire,  Scotland,  January  8,  i860,  a  son  of 
Alexander  and  Margaret  (Nelson)  Ritchie,  the  mother  also  a  native  of  that 
country.     The  father  was  born  on  shipboard  three  days  after  his  parents  sailed 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  147 

from  New  York  for  Scotland,  the  grandfather,  Alexander  Ritchie,  having  been 
a  citizen  of  New  York  state  for  twenty-six  years.  The  grandmother,  Mrs. 
Annie  (Stewart)  Ritchie,  died  when  her  son  Alexander  was  but  a  few  days  old. 
He  became  a  well  kno'wn  engineer  and  also  operated  an  iron  foundry  and  en- 
gaged in  the  coal  business  on  his  own  account  in  Glasgow,  Scotland,  where  he 
passed  away  in  1886  at  the  age  of  sixty-seven  years.  His  wife  also  died  in 
Glasgow,  in  March,  1906,  when  eighty-three  years  of  age,  and  of  their  family  of 
ten  children  William  B.  was  the  sixth. 

In  his  boyhood  days  William  B.  Ritchie  was  a  pupil  in  the  public  schools  of 
Glasgow  but  in  young  manhood,  attracted  by  the  opportunities  of  the  new  world, 
he  came  to  the  United  States  in  1888,  making  his  way  direct  to  Port  Angeles. 
From  1890  until  1892  he  filled  the  officee  of  deputy  sheriff  in  Clallam  county 
and,  taking  up  the  study  of  law,  was  admitted  to  the  bar  in  1896.  Through  the 
intervening  period  he  has  advanced  steadily  until  he  has  long  since  left  the  ranks 
of  the  many  and  stands  among  the  successful  few,  being  recognized  as  one  of 
the  leading  attorneys  of  Port  Angeles  and  the  northern  peninsula.  He  was  elected 
prosecuting  attorney  of  Clallam  county  in  1908  and  was  re-elected  in  1910,  filling 
the  ofifice  most  acceptably,  strictest  integrity  actuating  his  every  move.  En- 
dowed with  a  strong  judicial  mind,  ripened  and  broadened  by  deep  and  constant 
study,  it  is  a  natural  consecjuence  that  he  has  attained  more  than  ordinary  suc- 
cess in  his  chosen  field. 

In  June,  1884,  in  Glasgow,  Scotland,  Mr.  Ritchie  was  married  to  Miss  Annie 
Waddington,  a  daughter  of  John  and  Anna  (Clarke)  Waddington,  the  former  a 
native  of  Lancashire,  England,  and  the  latter  of  Scotland.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Ritchie 
have  become  the  parents  of  five  children:  Mrs.  Elliot  D.  Sower,  who  was  born 
in  Glasgow  and  is  now  living  in  Seattle ;  Alexander,  who  was  born  in  Glasgow  and 
is  a  resident  of  Port  Angeles;  William  E.,  who  was  born  in  Port  Angeles  in 
October,  1888,  and  married  Miss  Ruth  Dover,  by  whom  he  has  two  children; 
Margaret,  the  wife  of  Herbert  Godfrey,  a  merchant  of  Sequim.  Clallam  county, 
by  whom  she  has  one  child,  George  Ritchie  Godfrey ;  and  Angeline  M.,  who  is  a 
graduate  of  the  Emerson  College  of  Oratory  at  Boston,  Massachusetts,  and  now 
resides  with  her  parents.  The  children  are  all  graduates  of  the  Port  Angeles 
schools. 

Fraternally  Mr.  Ritchie  is  connected  with  the  Elks,  the  Knights  of  Pythias, 
the  Fraternal  Order  of  Eagles  at  Seattle  and  the  Loyal  Order  of  Moose.  His 
political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican  party  and  he  has  served  as  council- 
man at  large  in  Port  Angeles,  while  in  1908  he  was  elected  mayor  of  the  city. 
He  belongs  to  the  Clallam  County  and  Washington  State  Bar  Associations  and 
to  the  International  Society  of  Criminology,  which  indicates  his  deep  interest 
in  everything  pertaining  to  his  profession  and  his  profound  study  into  the  causes 
of  crime.  A  contemporary  writer  spoke  of  Mr.  Ritchie  as  "one  of  the  foremost 
lawyers  of  the  Pacific  northwest,  with  a  personality  that  would  attract  more  than 
passing  attention  anywhere.  Coming  here  in  1888.  he  immediately  took  up  the 
white  man's  burden  of  making  this  a  real  city  and  lending  his  best  endeavors 
toward  the  further  development  of  the  rich  resources  of  Clallam  county.  He  was 
especially  active  in  securing  a  lease  for  the  city  from  the  government  for  Ediz 
Spit,  making  a  trip  to  Washington  and  also  visiting  Portland,  Oregon,  several 
times  before  the  deal  was  finally  consummated  by  act  of  congress.    It  is  generally 


148  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

conceded  that  it  was  largely  due  to  the  efforts  of  Mr.  Ritchie  that  Port  Angeles 
has  this  valuable  asset.  He  has  been  identified  with  all  commercial  organizations  c 
for  the  upbuilding  of  his  city,  his  county  and  the  Olympic  peninsula,  serving  as 
officer  and  director  and  giving  freely  of  his  time  and  money  for  this  purpose." 
So  valuable  has  been  his  work  in  those  connections  that  he  is  accorded  rank 
with  the  most  honored  and  valued  residents  of  his  community,  recognized  as  a- 
man  whose  admirable  purpose  and  strong  character  have  largely  dominated  the 
progressive  interests  of  his  section  of  the  state.  ' 


JOHN  R.  KINNEAR. 


From  the  time  of  his  arrival  in  Seattle  in  1883  until  his  death  on  the  31st  of 
March,  19 12,  John  R.  Kinnear  was  closely  associated  with  events  that  shaped  the 
history  of  city  and  state.  He  aided  in  framing  the  organic  law  of  Washington 
and  in  shaping  its  legislation  both  during  the  territorial  period  and  after  state- 
hood was  secured.  His  name  is  thus  inseparably  interwoven  with  the  annals 
of  the  northwest  and  the  record  of  no  man  in  public  service  has  been  more 
faultless  in  honor,  fearless  in  conduct  or  stainless  in  reputation. 

A  native  of  Indiana,  John  R.  Kinnear  was  a  lad  of  seven  summers  when  his 
parents  removed  to  Walnut  Grove,  Woodford  county,  Illinois,  where  they  located 
upon  a  farm.  The  routine  of  farm  life  for  John  R.  Kinnear  was  uninterrupted 
until  after  he  had  completed  the  district-school  course,  when  he  had  the  oppor- 
tunity of  becoming  a  student  in  the  Washington  (111.)  high  school.  Still  later 
he  attended  Eureka  College  and  when  he  had  completed  his  work  there  he 
entered  upon  a  four  years'  classical  course  in  Knox  College  at  Galesburg,  Illinois. 
He  was  a  student  in  that  institution  at  the  time  of  the  outbreak  of  the  Civil  war, 
when  with  patriotic  spirit  he  responded  to  the  country's  call  for  troops,  enlisting 
for  three  years  as  a  private  soldier.  He  participated  in  about  twenty  of  the  great 
battles  of  the  war  and  some  years  afterward,  at  the  request  of  his  comrades, 
wrote  and  published  a  history  of  the  regiment  and  brigade,  the  volume  containing 
one  hundred  and  forty  pages.  Mr.  Kinnear  proved  a  most  brave  and  loyal 
soldier,  never  faltering  in  the  performance  of  duty  whether  stationed  upon  the 
firing  line  or  the  lonely  picket  line. 

When  the  war  was  over  and  the  country  no  longer  needed  his  aid  Mr.  Kinnear 
pursued  a  course  in  the  Chicago  Law  School  and  following  his  admission  to  the 
bar  located  for  practice  at  Paxton,  Illinois,  where  he  remained  in  the  active  work 
of  his  profession  for  fifteen  years.  While  there  he  was  prosecuting  attorney  for 
three  years  and  was  also  master  in  chancery  for  four  years.  In  1883  he  arrived 
in  Seattle  and  almost  immediately  became  an  active  factor  in  molding  public 
thought  and  action.  In  1884  he  was  elected  to  the  territorial  legislature  from 
King  county  upon  the  republican  ticket,  and  in  November,  1888,  he  was  again 
called  upon  for  public  service,  being  elected  a  member  of  the  council  or  the  upper 
house  of  the  territorial  legislature.  He  did  not  take  his  seat  in  that  body,  how- 
ever, on  account  of  the  passage  of  the  enabling  act  for  the  admission  of  the 
state.  However,  he  was  elected  to  the  state  constitutional  convention  from  the 
twentieth  district  and  took  a  most  helpful  part  in  framing  the  constitution.     He 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  149 

was  made  chairman  of  the  committee  on  corporations  and  he  left  the  impress  of  his 
individuality  in  many  ways  upon  the  organic  law  of  Washington.  Mr.  Kinnear 
also  made  a  close  race  for  the  office  of  first  governor  of  the  state,  for  which  he 
was  supported^'by  the  entire  twenty-five  delegates  from  King  county  and  received' 
one  hundred  and  thirty  votes  in  the  republican  state  convention.  He  was  a  mem- 
ber of  the  state  senate  in  its  first  and  second  sessions  and  during  both  served 
as  chairman  of  the  judiciary  committee.  It  would  be  impossible  to  estimate  the 
value  of  his  public  service  but  all  who  know  aught  of  the  history  of  Washington 

^recognize  its  worth  and  feel  that  he  was  among  those  who  laid  broad  and  deep 
the  foundation  upon  which  has  been  builded  the  superstructure  of  a  great  com- 
monwealth.    He  was  married  at  Bloomington,   Illinois,  June  2,   1868,  to  Miss 

^Rebecea  Means,  of  Bloomington,  and  they  became  parents  of  two  children,  Ritchey 
M.v&nd  Leta,  both  of  Seattle.     The  mother  died  May  10,  1913. 

Ritchey  M.  Kifmear,  a  resident  of  Seattle,  was  born  at  Paxton,  Ford  county, 
Illinois,  January  18,  1870.  He  attended  the  public  schools  to  the  age  of  thirteen 
and  then  came  to  Seattle  with  his  parents,  where  he  became  a  student  in  the 
Territorial  University,  now  the  University  of  Washington.  In  1890  he  matricu- 
lated in  the  Northwestern  University  at  Evanston,  Illinois,  where  he  studied  for 
two  years  and  then  returned  to  Seattle.  Here  he  engaged  in  the  real-estate 
business  with  his  brother-in-law,  A.  L.  Brown,  under  the  style  of  the  Kinnear  & 
Brown  Company,  and  when  a  change  in  the  personnel  of  the  firm  occurred  the 
name  was  changed  to  the  Kinnear  &  Paul  Company.  They  are  well  known  real- 
estate  dealers,  conducting  an  extensive  business  and  having  a  gratifying  clientage. 
Mr.  Kinnear,  like  his  father,  has  figured  prominently  in  public  connections,  having 
represented  his  district, in  the  state  senate  from  1902  until  1904.  He  was  married 
in  1893  to  Miss  Brownie  Brown,  a  daughter  of  Amos  Brown,  a  sketch  of  whom 
appears  elsewhere  in  this  work.     Mr.  and  Mrs.  Kinnear  have  a  son,  John  Amos. 


EVERETT  B.  DEMING. 

No  particularly  advantageous  circumstances  attended  the  initial  step  of 
Everett  B.  Deming  in  his  business  career.  In  fact,  his  start  was  a  most  humble 
one  and  his  salary  a  mere  pittance.  He  was  at  that  time  a  lad  of  fourteen.  The 
intervening  years,  however,  have  chronicled  his  steady  advancement  and  each 
initial  step  has  brought  him  a  broader  outlook  and  wider  opportunities  until,  at 
the  head  of  the  Pacific  American  Fisheries  Company,  he  conducts  not  only  one 
of  the  most  important  productive  interests  of  Bellingham  but  also  one  of  the 
largest  enterprises  of  the  kind  on  the  Pacific  coast. 

Mr.  Deming  was  born  in  St.  Touis,  Missouri,  in  September,  i860,  a  son  of 
Charles  Deming,  and  after  attending  the  public  and  high  schools  to  the  age  of 
fourteen  years  he  began  work  on  a  bench  in  a  horse  collar  factory,  where  he 
remained  for  three  years,  at  the  end  of  which  time  he  was  receiving  ten  dollars 
per  week.  Fle  afterward  accepted  the  position  of  bill  clerk  in  a  wholesale  gro- 
cery house,  where  he  spent  three  years,  and  then  turned  his  attention  to  the 
merchandise  brokerage  business  in  connection  with  the  Deming  &  Gould  Com- 
pany, of  which  his  brother,  F.  L.  Deming,  was  the  president.     He  afterward 


150  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

became  vice  president  of  that  company,  which  in  1893  removed  its  headquar- 
ters to  Chicago  but  still  retained  a  house  in  St.  Louis.  F.  L.  Deming  passed 
away  in  191 5  and  was  succeeded  in  the  presidency  by  Everett  B.  Deming,  who 
left  the  middle  west,  however,  in  1899  and  came  to  the  coast,  settling  at  Fair- 
haven,  now  Bellingham,  where  he  took  over  the  management  of  the  Pacific 
American  Fisheries  Company,  which  was  owned  by  a  Chicago  syndicate  in 
which  the  firm  of  Deming  &  Gould  was  interested.  In  1901  the  Pacific  Amer- 
ican Fisheries  Company  sold  out  to  the  Pacific  Packing  &  Navigation  Company, 
a  New  York  syndicate,  but  Everett  B.  Deming  continued  to  visit  Bellingham  in 
the  interests  of  the  Deming  &  Gould  Company  for  the  purpose  of  purchasing 
canned  salmon  for  their  brokerage  business  in  Chicago.  In  1903  the  Pacific 
Packing  &  Navigation  Company  went  into  the  hands  of  a  receiver,  who  con- 
tinued the  business  until  1904,  when  a  number  of  Chicago  men  took  over  the 
business,  including  Everett  B.  Deming,  S.  C.  Scotten,  H.  B.  Steel,  John  F. 
Harris,  George  B.  Harris  and  John  Cudahy.  Of  the  newly  organized  company 
John  F.  Harris  became  president  and  Everett  B.  Deming  vice  president  and 
general  manager.  In  January,  1907,  the  latter  was  elected  president  and  man- 
ager and  he  also  retained  the  presidency  of  the  Deming  &  Gould  Company,  of 
Chicago,  which  handled  the  entire  output  of  the  Pacific  American  Fisheries 
Company  and  also  the  output  of  several  other  large  salmon  canneries.  The 
Deming  &  Gould  Company  also  has  interests  in  several  large  fruit  canneries  in 
California  and  the  largest  pineapple  csLunery  in  Honolulu. 

The  Pacific  American  Fisheries  Company  has  its  largest  plant  in  Belling- 
ham, this  having  a  capacity  for  canning  a  half  million  cans  of  salmon  per  day. 
They  also  own  a  salmon  cannery  at  Ahacortes,  Washington,  which  has  a  capac- 
ity of  two  hundred  and  fifty  thousand  cans  per  day.  In  1905  they  added  a  can 
manufacturing  plant  in  connection  with  their  Bellingham  cannery  which  turns 
out  ninety  million  cans  in  one  year,  and  they  have  also  added  a  box  making 
plant  which  turns  out  two  million  boxes  in  a  season.  Since  1905  they  have 
erected  six  salmon  canneries  in  Alaska  and  are  building  another  at  the  present 
writing.  They  have  also  acquired  steamships,  tugs  and  floating  equipment  which 
represents  an  investment  of  two  million  dollars.  During  their  season  they  em- 
ploy two  thousand  people.  This  company  owns  Eliza  island,  which  is  located 
on  Puget  Sound  and  in  Whatcom  county  and  comprises  one  hundred  and  sixty 
acres  of  land.  This  island  is  utilized  for  their  shipyards  and  net  fields.  They 
build  their  own  tugs  and  manufacture  their  own  steam  engines  in  their  large 
machine  shops.  They  have  recently  completed  arrangements  whereby  they  will 
build  during  1916  two  steamers  at  a  cost  of  approximately  two  hundred  thou- 
sand dollars  each.  They  will  be  wooden  vessels  two  hundred  and  twenty-five 
feet  long  with  a  beam  of  forty-two  feet  and  of  two  thotisand  tons  register  each 
and  will  have  capacity  of  fifty  thousand  cases  of  canned  salmon.  They  will  also 
have  passenger  accommodations  for  seventy-five  first  class  passengers  and  a 
large  number  of  steerage  passengers  and  each  ship  will  be  manned  by  about 
forty  men  and  officers.  They  will  be  oil  driven  and  their  twin  screws  will  be 
propelled  by  one  thousand  horse  power  steam  engines.  The  keels  will  be  laid 
down  together  and  it  is  expected  that  more  than  one  hundred  and  fifty  men  will 
be  utilized  in  their  building.  Both  will  be  placed  in  the  northern  service  and 
next  to  the  steamer  Windber  will  be  the  largest  in  the  Pacific  American  Fish- 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  151 

eries'  fleet  and  with  few  exceptions  will  be  the  largest  vessels  with  Bellingham 
as  a  home  port.  During  the  last  few  years  the  company  has  added  greatly  to 
its  fleet  and  has  today  one  of  the  largest  on  the  Sound  and  the  largest  of  any 
independent  canning  company  in  the  world.  There  are  thirty-five  vessels  ranging 
in  size  from  the  baby  five  horse  power  gas  tenders  to  the  steamer  Windber  of 
thirty-two  hundred  tons.  They  have  recently  purchased  another  steamer,  the 
Norwood,  of  eleven  hundred  tons  net.  Thus  is  indicated  something  of  the  vol- 
ume of  the  business  which  has  been  built  up  by  the  Pacific  American  Fisheries 
Company  largely  under  the  management  of  Everett  B.  Deming,  who,  studying 
conditions  and  recognizing  opportunities,  has  utilized  the  chances  which  have 
been  his  and  thereby  has  developed  an  industry  which  is  not  only  a  source  of 
wealth  to  the  stockholders  but  also  one  of  the  elements  of  commercial  growth  in 
Bellingham. 

In  Galena,  Illinois,  "Sir.  Deming  was  married  to  Miss  Caroline  Spratt  in 
November,  1884,  and  they  have  one  child,  Stewart  A.,  twenty-six  years  of  age, 
who  is  representing  the  Deming  &  Gould  Company  of  Chicago  in  Bellingham. 

Fraternally  Mr.  Deming  is  a  IMason  and  he  is  well  known  in  club  circles  in 
various  sections  of  the  country,  being  a  member  of  the  Bellingham  Country 
Club,  the  Chicago  Athletic  Club,  the  Rainier  Club  of  Seattle,  the  Seattle  Coun- 
try and  Gold  Club,  the  Los  Angeles  Country  Club  and  the  Los  Angeles  Athletic 
Club.  His  political  endorsement  is  given  to  the  republican  party.  His  life  has 
been  characterized  by  an  orderly  progression  that  has  resulted  from  untiring 
efifort,  indefatigable  energy  and  close  application.  In  all  of  his  business  afifairs 
he  seems  to  readily  discriminate  between  the  essential  and  the  nonessential  and, 
discarding  the  latter,  so  utilizes  the  former  that  he  seems  to  accomplish  at  any 
point  of  his  career  the  utmost  possibilities  for  successful  accomplishment  at  that 
point. 


FRANK  H.  LAMB. 


Frank  H.  Lamb,  promoter  and  organizer  of  the  Lamb  Machine  Company  and 
president  of  the  Wynoochee  Timber  Company,  is  classed  with  those  energetic, 
farsighted  business  men  who  are  developing  the  Grays  Harbor  district  and  making 
it  a  great  commercial  center  with  ramifying  business  interests  reaching  out  over 
a  broad  territory.  The  width  of  the  continent  separates  him  from  his  birthplace 
and  to  the  opportunities  of  the  west  he  brought  the  spirit  of  eastern  enterprise 
and  training.  He  was  born  near  Trenton,  New  Jersey,  in  1875  ^"^  "PO"  coming 
to  the  Pacific  coast  attended  the  Leland  Stanford  University  at  Palo  Alto,  Cali- 
fornia. He  came  to  Hoquiam  in  1898  and  first  engaged  in  the  timber  business, 
becoming  one  of  the  organizers,  in  1900,  of  the  Frank  H.  Lamb  Timber  Company, 
which  operated  a  logging  business  on  the  Wynoochee  river  until  February  ir. 
1916,  when  it  was  absorbed  by  the  Wynoochee  Timber  Company,  of  which 
Mr.  Lamb  is  the  president,  with  Gus  Carlson  as  the  vice  president  and  A.  W. 
Callow,  secretary.  This  company  is  now  building  a  railroad  and  equipping  a 
modern  lumber  camp  and  they  employ  between  three  and  four  hundred  men. 
After  successfully  operating  for  some  time  in  the  timber  business  Mr.  Lamb 
organized  the  Lamb  Machine  Company,  which  was  formed  in  August,  1912,  and 


152  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

of  which  he  was  chosen  president,  wdiile  M.  H.  McLean  was  elected  secretary  and 
W.  R.  Marvin,  manager.  They  built  a  shop  which  is  completely  equipped  and 
they  carry  a  full  line  of  logging  supplies,  machinery  and  parts  and  also  do  repair 
work  of  all  kinds.  The  company  has  built  up  an  extensive  business  in  this  line, 
owing  largely  to  the  unfaltering  enterprises  and  indefatigable  energy  of  the 
president,  who,  bending  his  efforts  to  administrative  direction  and  executive 
control,  has  brought  a  substantial  measure  of  success  to  the  undertaking. 

Business,  however,  constitutes  but  one  phase  of  Mr.  Lamb's  activity.  He  is 
one  of  the  public-spirited  men  of  Hoquiam  and  since  January,  191 5,  has  been 
president  of  the  Hoquiam  Commercial  Club,  in  which  connection  he  has  instituted 
many  plans  and  projects  for  the  upbuilding  and  improvement  of  the  city,  plans 
which  are  already  productive  of  practical  and  substantial  results.  Moreover, 
he  is  a  leading  representative  of  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks  at 
Hoquiam  and  was  the  first  exalted  ruler  of  the  local  lodge  and  the  prime  mover 
in  the  building  of  the  Elks'  Home,  serving  at  the  time  as  chairman  of  the  building 
committee.  His  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican  party  and  his 
position  upon  any  vital  question  is  never  an  equivocal  one,  bvit  he  does  not  seek 
the  honors  and  emoluments  of  office. 

Mr.  Lamb  was  married  in  California,  in  1900,  to  Miss  Alice  E.  Emerson,  a 
daughter  of  George  H.  Emerson,  mentioned  elsewhere  in  this  work,  and  they 
have  four  children,  George,  Clara,  Florence  and  Alice.  The  family  occupy  an 
attractive  home,  which  was  built  in  1910,  and  ]\Ir.  and  ]\Irs.  Lamb  hold  an 
enviable  position  in  the  social  circles  of  Hoquiam.  His  activity  has  been  a 
resultant  force  along  commercial,  industrial,  fraternal  and  civic  lines  and  those 
who  know  aught  of  his  history  feel  that  Hoquiam  owes  much  to  his  intelligently 
directed  efforts. 


H.  N.  ANDERSON. 


On  the  list  of  honored  dead  of  Aberdeen  appears  the  name  of  H.  N.  Ander- 
son, who  was  closely  associated  with  the  development  and  upbuilding  of  the 
city  for  many  years,  his  efforts  being  of  far-reaching  effect  and  importance. 
He  was  born  in  Altoona,  Pennsylvania,  in  1838  and  there  spent  the  days  of  his 
boyhood  and  youth,  pursuing  his  education  in  the  public  schools.  In  early 
manhood  he  was  married  there  to  Miss  Sarah  W.  Counsman,  of  Altoona,  who 
passed  away  prior  to  the  death  of  her  husband.  In  1878  they  left  the  Keystone 
state  and  removed  to  Michigan,  w'here  Mr.  Anderson  engaged  in  the  lumber 
business  until  1898,  when  he  removed  from  Greenville,  Michigan,  to  Aberdeen. 
Broad  practical  experience  had  made  him  thoroughly  acquainted  with  every 
phase  of  the  lumber  trade  and  upon  his  arrival  in  the  northwest  he  purchased 
the  T-  M.  Weatherwax  lumber  mill  and  organized  the  Anderson  &  Middleton 
Lumber  Company,  of  which  he  continued  the  president  until  his  death  in  No- 
vember, 1906,  with  A.  W.  Middleton  as  the  vice  president  and  S.  M.  Anderson 
secretary  and  treasurer.  They  made  improvements  in  the  mill,  installing  mod- 
em machinery  and  increasing  its  capacity.     They  manufacture  lumber  and  lath 


H.  N.  ANDERSON 


THE   NEW   YORK 
PUBLIC  UBRARY 


ASTOR,    LENOX 
TILDEN   FOUNDATION 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  155 

from  fir  and  spruce  timber  and  the  mill  is  still  in  operation,  giving  employment 
to  one  hundred  and  fifty  people,  while  its  capacity  is  one  hundred  and  seventy- 
five  thousand  feet.  The.  equipment  is  now  thoroughly  modern  and  includes  fine 
concrete  dry  kilns.  The  company  also  operates  its  own  logging  camps  near 
Oakville,  Washington,  and  is  now  opening  a  new  camp  on  the  railroad  of  the 
Oregon  Railway  &  Navigation  Company  near  North  river.  The  company  does 
its  own  rafting  and  employs  about  one  hundred  and  fifty  fnen  in  the  lumber 
camps.  Since  the  death  of  Mr.  Anderson  the  business  has  been  continued  under 
the  same  name,  with  A.  W.  Middleton  as  president,  S.  M.  Anderson  vice  pres- 
ident, H.  N.  Anderson,  Jr.,  treasurer,  and  G.  E.  Anderson  secretary  and  assistant 
manager.  Aside  from  his  interests  here  Mr.  Anderson  was  president  of  the 
Southern  Humboldt  Lumber  Company  at  Andersonia,  California,  where  they 
built  a  mill  thoroughly  equipped  according  to  most  modern  methods  and  engaged 
in  the  manufacture  of  redwood  timber.  Mr.  Anderson  was  also  president  of 
the  Washington  Portland  Cement  Company  at  Concrete,  Washington,  of  which 
he  was  one  of  the  organizers. 

In  his  political  views  Air.  Anderson  was  a  republican  and  always  gave  loyal 
support  to  the  principles  in  which  he  believed  but  he  had  no  desire  nor  ambition 
to  hold  office,  preferring  to  concentrate  his  energies  upon  his  business  affairs, 
which  he  gradually  developed  to  large  and  satisfying  proportions.  He  found 
keen  delight  in  mastering  business  problems  and  working  out  the  solution  for 
any  intricate  question  which  arose  in  connection  with  the  lumber  industry. 
Many  evidences  of  his  public  spirit  might  be  cited  and  Aberdeen  numbers  him 
with  those  who  have  been  foremost  in  the  upbuilding  of  the  city. 

To  Air.  and  Airs.  Anderson  were  born  three  sons  and  six  daughters,  the 
latter  being  as  follows:  Ida  B.,  the  wife  of  Lemuel  Elway;  Carrie  M.,  who 
gave  her  hand  in  marriage  to  Dr.  A.  S.  Austin ;  Martha  C,  the  wife  of  A.  W. 
Middleton;  Alanola  S..  who  is  Mrs.  E.  C.  Aliller;  Daisy  M.,  who  is  the  wife 
of  A.  J.  Kingsley,  of  Portland ;  and  Lula  G.  Samuel  AI.,  the  oldest  son  of  Air. 
and  Airs.  Anderson,  is  vice  president  of  the  Anderson-Middleton  Company  and 
also  president  of  the  Bay  City  Lumber  Company  of  Aberdeen.  He  wedded 
Miss  Louise  Bancroft  and  has  three  sons :  Harold  B.,  Samuel  M.,  Jr.,  and 
Reginald.  H.  N.  Anderson,  Jr.,  the  second  son,  is  treasurer  of  the  Anderson- 
Aliddleton  Company  and  also  manager  of  the  Anderson-Middleton  Timber 
Company,  which  is  the  logging  part  of  the  business.  He  married  Miss  Ida  B. 
Middleton,  by  whom  he  had  three  children,  namely :  Middleton  and  Jack,  who 
are  deceased ;  and  Priscilla,  who  is  with  her  parents  in  Seattle. 

G.  E.  Anderson,  secretary  and  assistant  manager  of  the  Anderson  &  Mid- 
dleton Lumber  Company,  was  born  in  Pennsylvania  in  1874  and  following  the 
removal  of  the  family  to  Alichigan  in  his  boyhood  days  he  obtained  his  education 
in  the  common  schools.  He  is  a  son  of  H.  N.  and  Sarah  W.  (Counsman)  An- 
derson and  in  his  youthful  days  he  acquainted  himself  with  the  lumber  trade 
under  the  direction  of  his  father,  long  a  prominent  lumberman  of  Alichigan 
and  of  Washington.  The  occupation  to  which  he  was  reared  he  has  continued  to 
follow  as  a  life  work  and  with  the  reorganization  of  the  business,  following  the 
death  of  his  father,  he  became  secretary  and  assistant  manager,  in  which  con- 
nection he  still  continues.  This  is  a  close  corporation,  the  stock  being  all  owned 
by   members   of   the   family.     The   company   not    only  manufactures  lumber  at 


156  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

Aberdeen  but  also  has  its  own  logging  camp  and  the  number  of  its  employes 
totals  three  hundred  and  twenty-five  or  more. 

In  1896  Mr.  Anderson  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Nellie  A.  Green,  of 
Michigan,  by  whom  he  has  five  children,  namely:  Henry 'N.,  George  Edgar, 
Emmett  D.,  Donald  C.  and  Martha  Jeannette.  Mr.  Anderson  is  prominent  in 
Masonic  circles,  having  attained  the  thirty-second  degree  of  the  Scottish  Rite, 
and  he  is  also  identified  with  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  He  has 
followed  in  his  father's  political  as  well  as  business  footsteps,  becoming  a  stal- 
wart republican,  for  his  mature  judgment  sanctions  the  course  of  the  party  and 
its  purposes  and  policy.  No  public  movement  for  the  benefit  of  his  city,  county 
or  state  seeks  his  aid  in  vain ;  on  the  contrary,  he  is  quick  to  respond  to  any 
call  and  manifests  the  progressive  spirit  which  has  been  the  dominant  factor  in 
the  substantial  and  rapid  upbuilding  of  this  section  of  the  country. 


HON.  W.  H.  PAULHAMUS. 

The  Hon.  W.  H.  Paulhamus  is  the  proprietor  of  Maplelawn  Farm,  one  of 
the  valuable  farm  properties  that  has  demonstrated  the  fertility  and  productive- 
ness of  the  Puyallup  valley.  His  work  is  an  expression  of  the  most  scientific 
methods  of  raising  fruits  and  he  is  also  most  successfully  engaged  in  dairy- 
ing. His  business,  however,  constitutes  but  one  phase  of  his  activity  for  he 
has  been  prominently  connected  with  the  history  of  the  state  in  shaping  its  leg- 
islative course  and  his  value  as  a  citizen  is  widely  acknowledged. 

Mr.  Paulhamus  came  to  Washington  from  the  east,  his  birth  having  occurred 
at  Altoona,  Pennsylvania,  in    1865.     In  childhood  he  accompanied  his  parents 
on  their  removal  to  Sharon,  Pennsylvania,  and  was  a  lad  of  twelve  years  when 
the  family  was  established  in  Youngstown,  Ohio.     He  is  indebted  to  the  public 
school  system  for  the  educational  opportunities  which  prepared  him   for  life's 
practical  and  responsible  work.     He  was  a  young  man  of  eighteen  when  he  left 
home  and  started  out  to  try  his  fortune  in  the  west.     He  first  located  in  Aber- 
deen, South  Dakota,  where  he  secured  a  clerical  position  in  the  banking  house 
of  Hagerty  &  Marple  with  which  he  was  connected  for  six  years,  his  ability, 
honesty  and  fidelity  winning  him  promotion  from  time  to  time.     Leaving  South 
Dakota  he  came  to  Washington  in  1890,  then  a  young  man  of  twenty-four  years, 
and  has  since  been  closely  associated  with  the  business  interests  and  develop- 
ment of  the  Puyallup  valley.     He  was  employed  as  cashier  of  the  Sumner  Bank 
but  after  three  years  resigned  to  enter  the  sheriff's  ofifice.     In   1896  he  estab- 
lished a  real  estate  and  loan  business  in  Tacoma  and  during  the  following  year 
was  connected  with  the  legal  department  of  the  Northern  Pacific  Railroad  Com- 
pany.    In  1898  he  became  the  owner  of  Maplelawn  Farm  and  took  up  the  work 
of  mastering  not  only  the  practical  but  also  the  scientific  phase  of  farming.    His 
success   is  visibly  expressed  in  his  commodious  and  attractive  home,  which  is 
surrounded  by  a  well  kept  lawn ;  in  his  large  and  sanitary  barn  and  outbuild- 
ings ;  and  in  his  well  kept  orchards  and  fields.     He  is  extensively  engaged  in 
raising  berries  and  his  business  experience  was  such  that  he  realized  no  per- 
manent success  could  be  obtained  in  growing  and  marketing  them  without  thor- 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  157 

ough  organization  among  those  so  engaged  and  in  1902,  therefore,  he  was  active 
in  organizing  the  Fruit  Growers'  Association  at  Sumner,  of  which  he  was 
chosen  first  vice  president.  Largely  through  his  instrumentality  this  organiza- 
tion was  consolidated  with  a  similar  one  at  Puyallup  in  the  same  year  under  the 
name  of  the  Puyallup  &  Sumner  Fruit  Growers'  Association  of  which  Mr. 
Paulhamus  has  been  the  president  for  a  number  of  years.  While  the  organiza- 
tion met  with  difficulties  and  passed  through  a  period  of  early  struggle  its  growth 
and  success  in  later  years  have  been  remarkable. 

As  previously  stated,  when  Mr.  Paulhamus  became  owner  of  Maplelawn 
Farm  he  determined  to  know  everything  that  is  to  be  known  about  farming  and 
the  reason  why.  In  other  words  he  resolved  to  master  the  business  in  all  of  its 
scientific  phases  and  to  bring  his  place  of  sixty-five  acres  to  the  highest  state 
of  cultivation  possible.  He  studied  the  use  of  fertilizers  and  today  uses  every 
kind  which  he  has  proven  will  increase  the  productiveness  of  his  land.  Some- 
thing of  the  result  that  came  is  shown  in  the  fact  that  in  1910  on  a  trifle  less 
than  an  acre  and  a  quarter  of  land  there  were  more  than  eleven  hundred  and 
eighty-four  crates  of  raspberries,  amounting  to  twenty-one  thousand  eight  hun- 
dred and  sixty-four  pounds  and  a  net  income  of  nine  hundred  dollars.  He  has 
today  five  acres  in  rhubarb ;  five  acres  in  asparagus ;  ten  acres  in  orchards  and 
the  remainder  of  his  land  has  been  divided  into  building  sites.  Maplelawn  is 
the  largest  producer  of  blackberries  and  raspberries  of  any  farm  in  the  Puyal- 
lup valley  and  the  yield  per  acre  is  equal  to  the  maximum. 

Horticulture,  however,  is  but  one  branch  of  his  farming  for  he  is  also  exten- 
sively and  successfully  engaged  in  the  dairy  business,  having  one  of  the  finest 
herds  of  pure  blooded  Jerseys — fifty  in  number — to  be  found  in  western  Wash- 
ington. The  milk  is  bottled  on  the  farm  and  is  sold  as  certified  milk  in  Seattle 
and  Tacoma  at  fifteen  cents  per  quart.  His  dairy  plant  also  handles  about  five 
hundred  gallons  of  milk  purchased  from  other  dairymen  of  the  valley  and  which 
is  also  bottled  and  shipped  under  ice  to  the  two  cities  where  it  is  sold  with  a 
guarantee  of  purity.  He  makes  an  annual  test  for  tuberculosis  with  every  cow 
whose  milk  is  used  in  his  dairy.  He  raises  pigs,  chickens,  turkeys  and  guineas. 
Throughout  the  entire  year  Mr.  Paulhamus  employs  ten  men  on  his  farm  and 
through  the  berry  season  one  hundred  additional  persons  are  required  to  handle 
the  crop.  Comfortable  houses  are  furnished  the  berry  pickers  so  that  a  man 
may  have  his  family  near  him  during  that  period.  The  buildings  on  the  farm 
are  modern  and  splendidly  equipped.  Water  is  piped  and  the  most  sanitary 
conditions  are  found  in  the  stables  and  barns,  in  fact,  there  is  no  equipment  of 
the  modern  farm  that  is  not  found  on  his  place.  •  One  of  the  strongest  elements 
is  the  close  study  that  he  has  given  to  every  phase  of  his  work.  After  organ- 
izing the  fruit  growers  of  the  district  he  was  active  in  taking  the  next  forward 
step  towards  making  the  berry  industry  a  profitable  one.  He  realized  thai 
railroad  rates  must  be  lowered  and  better  shipping  facilities  secured.  At  that 
time  but  one  railroad  entered  the  Puyallup  valley  and  the  railroad  officials  were 
hard  to  reason  with  so  that  the  proposition  was  made  at  length  a  political  one 
and  in  1903  the  public  demanded  the  creation  of  a  railroad  commission,  the  duty 
of  which  would  be  to  investigate  the  complaints  of  the  shippers  and  to  compel 
the  various  railroads  within  the  state  to  be  public  service  institutions  in  deed  as 
well  as  in  name.     The  paramount  issue  of  the  campaign  of   1904  was  the  rail- 


158  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

road  commission  and  a  railway  commission  law  was  placed  upon  the  statute 
books  of  the  state  in  1905.  So  active  was  Mr.  Paulhamus  in  the  movement  that 
his  fellow  citizens  felt  that  he  should  represent  them  in  legislative  matters  and 
in  1906  he  was  elected  to  the  state  senate.  Then  began  active  work  for  the 
accomplishment  of  the  purpose  for  which  the  railway  commission  was  created. 
He  felt  that  this  purpose  was  not  being  accomplished  and  his  first  act  after 
becoming  senator  was  to  demand  the  resignation  of  John  S.  McMillan,  the 
chairman  of  the  railway  commission,  who,  he  claimed,  was  not  in  sympathy 
with  the  fundamental  objects  of  the  commission  and  was  not  giving  the  duties 
of  his  office  sincere  thought  or  attention.  His  attitude  resulted  in  Mr.  ]\IcMil- 
lan's  resignation  and  largely  upon  the  recommendation  of  Senator  Paulhamus, 
Governor  Mead  appointed  Jesse  Jones  to  the  position,  with  the  result  that  the 
railway  commission  began  doing  the  work  for  w^hich  it  was  created,  its  growth 
making  it  an  institution  of  great  value  to  the  district.  Senator  Paulhamus  was 
also  connected  with  much  other  important  work  accomplished  during  that  ses- 
sion. He  became  the  recognized  leader  and  helped  in  the  organization  of  the 
famous  'Tnsurgent"  group,  whose  purpose  was  to  wrest  the  control  of  the 
senate  from  the  corporations.  A  direct  primary'  law  was  also  passed  during 
that  session  and  various  other  laws  of  a  popular  and  constructive  character.  A 
contemporary  writer,  speaking  of  his  further  activities  says :  "Two  years  later, 
in  the  session  of  1907,  Senator  Paulhamus  was  again  on  the  firing  line.  It  w-as 
he  who  formulated  the  charges  of  impeachment  against  Secretary  of  State  Sam 
H.  Nichols  and  State  Insurance  Commissioner  J.  H.  Schively,  and  who  led  the 
fight  and  made  the  celebrated  speech  that  revealed  to  the  state  at  large  the 
manifold  malfeasances  and  delinquencies  of  those  two  public  officials.  Nichols 
resigned  at  once,  and  the  vote  for  the  impeachment  of  Schively  stood  twenty- 
seven  ayes  and  thirteen  noes,  twenty-eight  votes  or  two-thirds  of  the  senate — 
being  necessary  to  "carry  the  resolution.  This  also  w-as  the  session  in  which  the 
fight  came  up  for  local  option  and  for  a  law  abolishing  racehorse  gambling 
— both  of  which  carried  and  on  both  of  which  questions  Senator  Paulhamus 
was  aligned  with  the  moral  forces."  Never  for  a  moment  has  Senator  Paul- 
hamus ceased  his  activity  on  behalf  of  the  public  interest.  He  was  largely  in- 
strumental in  organizing  the  \^alley  Fair  and  has  been  a  prime  mover  in  advo- 
cating its  growth  and  making  it  an  institution  of  great  value  and  worth  to  the 
district.  That  he  has  been  actuated  by  a  most  sincere  motive  of  public  service 
in  this  connection  is  indicated  in  the  fact  that  although  he  has  been  each  year 
a  high  official  of  the  Fair  Association  and  for  years  has  been  its  president,  he 
has  never  received  one  dollar  of  salary,  but  on  the  contrary  has  expended  many 
hundreds  of  dollars  of  his  own  for  the  benefit  of  the  association. 

In  1890  Senator  Paulhamus  was  married  in  Detroit.  jMichigan,  to  Miss 
Alice  Noyes  Johnson  who,  like  her  husband,  is  most  popular  among  their  many 
friends  for  she  possesses  a  most  admirable  character,  winning  the  love  and 
esteem  of  all.  In  the  Paulhamus  family  are  two  sons  and  two  daughters. 
Alice,  who  attended  the  State  College  of  Science  at  Pullman,  Washington,  and 
also  the  State  University  at  Seattle  is  now  the  wife  of  a  Mr.  Tebb  of  Hoquiam, 
AVashington.  Clay  is  a  graduate  of  the  high  school  at  Sumner  and  is  manager 
of  the  home  farm.     Carolyn  and  Dwight  are  at  home. 

As  one  would  naturally   expect   the   Paulhamus    home  is  one  of    the   most 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  159 

warm-hearted  and  hospitable.  An  excellent  characterization  of  the  Senator  is 
contained  in  the  following:  "Senator  Paulhamus  is  a  man  of  vigorous  intel- 
lect and  strong  personality.  That  he  is  a  man  also  of  remarkable  energy  and 
force  of  character  is  fully  attested  by  the  foregoing  recital  of  the  various  posi- 
tions he  has  filled  with  distinguished  credit  to  himself  and  with  satisfaction  to 
the  public.  Keen  and  active  of  mind,  he  observes  with  unusual  sagacity,  plans 
with  careful  forethought  and  executes  with  vigor  and  with  regard  to  every 
detail.  These  qualities  are  characteristic  of  him.  both  in  business  and  in  the 
arena  of  politics.  A  man  of  less  pertinacity  and  continuity  of  purpose  could  not 
have  achieved  the  many  successes  that  have  accompanied  his  career.  His  most 
uncharitable  critic  will  not  contend  that  Senator  Paulhamus  has  ever  lost  an 
advantage  by  failure  to  fight  for  it.  Moreover,  his  convictions  are  as  strong  as 
his  tenacity  is  boundless ;  coupled  with  wdiich  is  a  resourcefulness  which  enables 
him  to  bear  a  leading  part  in  any  movement  or  discussion.  He  has  become  of 
late  years  a  very  facile  speaker,  particularly  on  subjects  pertaining  to  agriculture, 
horticulture,  dairying  and  fruit  marketing.  He  meets  requests'  for  addresses 
from  every  part  of  the  state.  Nor  does  he  ever  fail  to  illumine  the  subject  on 
which  he  talks.  His  incisive,  lucid  arguments  and  his  forceful  manner  of 
expression  always  enchain  the  attention  of  his  auditors." 


HARRY  B.  PAIGE. 


Harry  B.  Paige,  who  on  the  ist  of  March,  1912,  became  one  of  the  large 
stockholders  and  the  president  of  the  Northwestern  National  Bank  at  Belling- 
ham,  was  born  at  Hardwick,  Massachusetts,  April  6,  1876,  a  son  of  Timothy 
and  Ellen  Paige.  The  father  was  also  a  native  of  Hardwick,  born  July  16,  185 1, 
and  for  twenty  years  he  acceptably  filled  the  position  of  town  clerk  there,  was 
also  county  assessor  for  twenty-one  years  and  library  trustee  for  fifteen  years. 
He  has  also  held  other  than  local  offices,  for  he  was  chosen  to  represent  his  dis- 
trict in  the  state  legislature  in  1900-1.  He  is  financially  interested  in  the  North- 
western National  Bank  of  Bellingham,  of  which  he  is  the  vice  president,  but  has 
retired  from  active  business  management  and  is  now  enjoying  well  earned  rest 
in  his  native  town. 

At  the  usual  age  Harry  B.  Paige  entered  the  public  schools  of  Hardwick, 
passing  through  consecutive  grades  until  graduated  from  the  high  school  when 
eighteen  years  of  age.  He  afterward  entered  the  Worcester  Polytechnic  Insti- 
tute, where  he  completed  a  course  in  civil  engineering  as  a  member  of  the  class 
of  1898.  Going  to  Proctor,  Vermont,  he  there  engaged  as  general  utility  man 
with  the  \'ermont  Marble  Company  until  February,  1899,  when  he  became  sur- 
veyor for  the  Rutland  Railroad  on  its  line  across  Lake  Champlain.  He  resigned 
that  position  in  May,  1899,  to  become  a  member  of  the  United  States  geological 
survey,  covering  the  states  of  New  York,  Pennsylvania  and  Ohio,  acting  in 
that  capacity  until  November,  1901.  when  he  became  connected  with  a  Mr. 
Moore,  a  capitalist,  in  laying  out  the  streets  and  tracts  on  Capitol  Hill,  Seattle, 
which  work  occupied  his  attention  until  February,  1902.  He  then  removed  to 
Bellingham  and  entered  upon   survey  work  for  the  Bellingham   Bay  &  British 


160  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

Columbia  Railroad,  so  continuing  until  November,  1902,  when  he  entered  the 
head  office  in  Bellingham  as  assistant  to  J.  J.  Donovan,  general  superintendent. 
Upon  Mr.  Donovan's  resignation  in  April,  1906,  Mr.  Paige  became  his  successor 
and  so  continued  until  June  i,  1910.  Since  May,  191 1,  he  has  been  connected 
with  the  banking  business,  for  at  that  date  he  became  assistant  cashier  of  the 
Northwestern  National  Bank,  of  which  he  had  previously  been  a  stockholder. 
On  the  2d  of  March,  191 2.  he  was  elected  president.  The  bank  had  been  organ- 
ized in  March,  1908,  by  L  J.  Adair,  C.  X.  Larabee,  E.  B.  Demming,  Cyrus  Gates, 
H.  B.  Paige,  Olaf  Unness,  J.  L.  Easton,  F.  P.  Ofiferman  and  C.  K.  McMillin. 
1.  J.  Adair  became  the  president,  with  C.  X.  Larabee  as  vice  president  and  C. 
K.  Mc]\Iillin  cashier.  That  organization  continued  until  March  i,  1912,  when 
Timothy  Paige  and  his  son,  H.  B.  Paige,  bought  out  the  bank,  the  latter  becom- 
ing the  president  and  the  former  first  vice  president,  with  C.  K.  McMillin  as 
second  vice  president  and  cashier.  In  addition  to  the  officers  the  board  of 
directors  is  as  follows,  F.  P.  Ofiferman,  Dr.  S.  H.  Johnson  and  Edwin  Lopas. 
The  capital  stock  of  the  bank  is  one  hundred  thousand  dollars,  the  surplus  and 
undivided  profits  twenty-three  thousand  dollars  and  the  deposits  one  million 
sixty  thousand  dollars.  Under  the  present  management  the  bank  has  enjoyed 
a  period  of  profitable  existence  and  the  business  is  steadily  growing. 

On  the  6th  of  October,  1910,  Mr.  Paige  was  married  in  Seattle  to  Mrs. 
Maybelle  (Waldrip)  Kallock,  the  widow  of  H.  Kallock.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Paige 
have  two  children:  Calvin,  born  July  18,  191 1;  and  Sarah  Cynthia,  born 
November  25,    191 5. 

The  religious  faith  of  the  family  is  that  of  the  Unitarian  church  and  in  his 
political  belief  Mr.  Paige  is  a  republican.  Fraternally  he  is  identified  with  the 
Masons  and  he  belongs  to  the  Bellingham  Country  Club.  He  is  a  man  of 
scholarly  attainments,  with  keen  insight  into  business  situations,  and  his  well 
defined  plans  and  purposes  combined  with  his  thorough  understanding  of  the 
specific  business  in  which  he  is  engaged  have  been  the  salient  factors  in  bring- 
ing him  to  a  place  in  the  foremost  ranks  of  Bellingham's  successful  business 
men  and  financiers. 


JAMES  GLANCEY. 


James  Glancey,  president  of  the  firm  of  Strubel  &  Glancey,  dealers  in  groceries, 
meats,  hardware,  hay  and  feed,  was  born  June  30,  1863,  in  Ontario,  Canada,  and 
after  attending  the  common  schools  there  to  the  age  of  twenty-four  years  became 
a  resident  of  North  Dakota  in  1887.  In  the  latter  state  he  turned  his  attention 
to  farming  but  in  1888  removed  to  the  territory  of  Washington,  settling  in  Mason 
county.  He  spent  five  years  logging  in  the  woods,  after  which  he  removed  to 
Elma  and  purchased  a  third  interest  in  the  Strubel  Brothers  grocery  and  meat 
store,  which  was  then  a  small  concern.  In  1895  he  and  J.  W.  Strubel  bought 
out  the  interest  of  the  third  partner  and  incorporated  the  business  with  Mr. 
Glancey  as  president,  Mr.  Strubel  as  secretary-treasurer  and  H.  R.  Grayson  as 
vice  president.  The  last  named  is  also  manager  of  a  branch  store  owned  by  the 
company  at  McCleary,  Washington.    The  firm  also  owns  a  large  stock  ranch  which 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  161 

furnishes  their  meat  supply.  The  business  has  grown  from  a  small  beginning  to 
an  enterprise  of  extensive  proportions,  the  annual  sales  amounting  to  two  hundred 
thousand  dollars.  They  still  occupy  their  original  location  but  the  building  has 
been  increased  to  accommodate  their  extensive  stock.  While  a  most  potent  force 
in  the  development  and  upbuilding  of  this  undertaking,  Mr.  Glancey  has  also 
extended  his  efforts  into  other  fields,  being  vice  president  of  the  Farmers'  & 
Lumbermen's  Bank  of  Elma.  He  is  also  the  president  of  the  Grays  Harbor 
County  Fair  and  was  one  of  its  first  stockholders  upon  its  organization  in  1910. 
He  was  chosen  president  at  a  time  when  the  association  was  badly  in  debt  and 
it  seemed  that  the  fair  would  have  to  be  discontinued.  He  assumed  control,  intro- 
duced the  careful  business  methods  which  have  ever  guided  his  individual  interests 
and  has  made  the  undertaking  one  of  the  most  successful  in  the  state,  the  Grays 
Harbor  County  Fair  enjoying  a  wide  recognition  for  the  excellence  of  its  displays 
and  its  success. 

In  1894  Mr.  Glancey  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Ella  Murray,  a  native 
of  New  York,  who  in  her  early  girlhood  accompanied  her  parents  to  Elma.  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Glancey  have  three  daughters ;  Frances,  a  teacher  in  the  schools  of 
Elma;  Marie  and  Anna,  who  are  attending  an  academy  in  Seattle.  The  closest 
companionship  exists  between  father  and  daughters,  who  maintains  the  position 
not  only  of  parent  but  of  friend  and  confidant,  being  a  most  home-loving  man 
whose  interest  centers  in  his  family.  The  daughters  all  possess  musical  talent 
which  has  been  highly  cultivated.  The  family  are  adherents  of  the  Catholic  faith 
and  Mr.  Glancey  holds  membership  with  the  Knights  of  Columbus  and  the  Wood- 
men of  the  World.  He  has  also  been  president  of  the  Commercial  Club  of  Elma 
and  is  regarded  as  one  of  the  town's  most  substantial  citizens.  His  political  sup- 
port is  given  to  the  democratic  party  and  for  ten  years  he  has  been  a  member 
of  the  city  council,  in  which  connection  he  has  exercised  his  official  prerogatives 
in  support  of  many  valuable  plans  and  measures  resulting  in  the  public  good. 


JAMES  P.  CAITHNESS. 

James  P.  Caithness,  long  identified  with  the  lumber  industry  of  the  northwest, 
has  for  many  years  engaged  in  timber  cruising  and  dealing  in  timber  lands  and  in 
this  field  of  business  has  been  very  successful,  winning  a  place  among  Everett's 
most  substantial  citizens.  He  was  born  in  Kirkwell,  Scotland,  on  the  23d  of  June. 
1848,  a  son  of  Robert  and  Jane  (Pease)  Caithness,  who  were  also  natives  of 
Scotland.  On  removing  to  Canada  they  settled  at  Belleville  in  1856  and  for  over 
thirty  years  the  father  was  captain  of  vessels,  following  a  seafaring  life  for  more 
than  four  decades.  He  began  sailing  when  a  boy  and  during  his  long  experience 
visited  almost  every  port  of  the  world.  His  school  privileges  were  limited  but  he 
became  a  highly  educated  man  through  broad  reading,  study  and  experience, 
possessing  an  observing  eye  and  retentive  memory.  After  residing  in  Canada 
for  about  ten  years  he  removed  with  his  family  to  Michigan  and  there  conducted 
a  fruit  farm,  living  in  comparative  ease  and  comfort  to  the  time  of  his  death,  which 
occurred  in  1870,  while  his  wife  passed  away  two  years  later. 

James  P.  Caithness,  who  was  the  sixth  in  a  family  of  seven  children,  five 


162  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

daughters  and  two  sons,  was  educated  in  the  pubHc  schools  of  Canada  and  spent 
his  early  life  to  the  age  of  seventeen  years  upon  the  home  farm.  After  leaving 
the  farm  he  entered  the  lumber  woods  of  Michigan,  it  being  his  purpose  to 
thoroughly  acquaint  himself  with  the  business  in  every  detail.  He  began  cutting 
logs  by  contract,  learned  the  business  of  scaling  and  tallying  and  constantly 
worked  his  way  upward,  serving  in  all  branches  of  the  business  until  he  had 
attained  the  responsible  position  of  superintendent  with  the  A.  A.  Bigelow  Com- 
pany of  Chicago,  in  which  capacity  he  continued  for  nine  years.  .In  March,  1892, 
he  came  to  Washington,  settling  at  Everett,  where  he  built  and  operated  the  first 
shingle  mill.  In  recent  years  he  has  followed  cruising  and  dealing  in  timber 
lands  and  in  this  has  been  quite  successful.  He  has  had  wide  experience  as  a 
cruiser  and  is  said  to  be  one  of  the  most  proficient  in  the  business.  His  holdings 
in  timber  lands  are  now  extensive  and  he  is  also  the  owner  of  much  real  estate 
in  Everett. 

In  1882,  at  Saugatuck,  Michigan,  Mr.  Caithness  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Miss  May  Falconer,  a  native  of  Ontario,  Canada,  a  daughter  of  Thomas  and  Jane 
(Spears)  Falconer  and  a  sister  of  Congressman  J.  A.  Falconer  of  this  state. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Caithness  have  a  daughter  and  a  son.  Jennie  F.,  born  in  Saugatuck, 
Michigan,  is  a  graduate  of  the  University  of  Washington  and  of  the  Chicago 
Musical  College  and  now  teaches  Spanish  in  the  high  school.  Chester  J.,  a  grad- 
uate of  the  University  of  Washington  at  Seattle,  is  now  engaged  in  the  insurance 
business  in  Washington,  D.  C. 

The  family  attend  the  Congregational  church,  in  which  Mr.  Caithness  holds 
membership.  His  political  allegiance  was  given  the  republican  party  until  the 
progressive  party  was  organized,  when  he  joined  its  ranks.  He  has  always  been 
interested  in  vital  political  problems,  recognizing  the  duties  and  obligations  as 
well  as  the  privileges  of  citizenship,  and  he  has  ever  stood  for  that  which  is 
most  worth  while  in  the  welfare  of  the  community.  Those  who  know  him  esteem 
him  highly  and  his  worth  as  a  business  man  and  citizen  is  widely  acknowledged. 
He  well  deserves  the  proud  American  title  of  self-made  man,  for. the  success  which 
he  enjoys  is  attributable  entirely  to  his  own  efiforts  and  perseverance. 


PAUL  SMITS,  M.  D. 


A  feeling  of  widespread  amazement  and  bereavement  swept  over  i\berdeen  at 
the  news  of  the  sudden  demise  of  Dr.  Paul  Smits  on  the  24th  of  August,  191 5. 
He  was  endeared  to  his  fellow  citizens  as  a  man  of  high  personal  worth  as  well 
as  a  physician  of  marked  ability  and  he  gave  his  life  a  sacrifice  to  the  strenuous 
demands  of  his  profession  just  as  surely  as  the  soldier  becomes  a  victim  on  the 
field  of  battle.  He  realized,  as  did  his  professional  colleagues,  that  he  was  stead- 
ily drawing  upon  his  strength  and  yet  there  seemed  no  time  when  he  could  lay 
down  the  burden  because  of  his  great  humanitarian  spirit,  which  prompted  him 
at  all  times  to  reach  out  a  helping  hand  to  his  fellowmen,  and  thus  death  claimed 
its  victim  when  he  was  but  forty-five  years  of  age. 

There  is  much  that  is  beautiful  and  much  that  is  inspiring  in  the  life  record  of 
Dr.  Smits.    He  was  a  native  of  Dubuque,  Iowa,  and  removed  to  the  northwest  in 


DR.  PAUL  SMITS 


THE   NEW   roRK 
^^^UC  LIBRARY, 

ASTOR,    LENOX 
J^DEN  FOUNDATION 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  165 

his  boyhood  days.  He  worked  at  anything  he  could  get  to  do  to  make  a  Uving, 
attended  the  public  schools  and  finally  he  completed  a  high  school  course  at 
Seattle  by  graduation.  He  then  entered  upon  the  study  of  medicine  and  surgery 
in  the  University  of  Michigan  at  Ann  Arbor  and  Aberdeen  became  the  first  field  of 
his  active  professional  labor.  He  removed  to  this  city  and  here  he  not  only 
engaged  in  the  general  practice  of  medicine  bvit  also  founded  the  Aberdeen  General 
Hospital  in  December,  1900.  This  institution  proved  of  great  value  to  the  com- 
munity as  it  was  maintained  according  to  the  highest  professional  standards.  His 
ability  and  energy  won  him  a  place  in  the  front  rank  of  the  medical  practitioners 
and  he  was  constantly  broadening  his  efficiency  by  further  study,  research  and 
investigation.  He  was  induced  to  come  to  Aberdeen  by  his  devoted  friend,  Dr 
J.  H.  Dumon,  of  Centralia,  who  was  a  member  of  the  state  board  of  medical  exami- 
ners for  seven  years  and  who  said  that  Dr.  Smits  received  the  highest  percentage 
mark  of  any  physician  having  taken  the  examination  up  to  that  time,  passing  one 
hundred  per  cent  in  all  but  one  subject  and  being  almost  perfect  in  that  one.  He 
was  therefore  recognized  by  all  the  members  of  the  board  as  one  of  the  most 
promising  men  in  the  profession.  From  the  beginning  of  his  residence  in  Aberdeen 
he  carried  in  mind  the  thought  of  building  a  hospital  and  a  few  years  later  saw 
the  beginning  of  the  fulfillment  of  his  plans,  for  his  practice  had  become  extensive 
and  brought  to  him  the  financial  basis  for  his  hospital  work.  He  was  ever  ready 
to  respond  to  a  professional  call  night  or  day  and  he  traveled  and  worked  under 
high  pressure,  going  to  the  lumber  camps  when  other  physicians  would  not,  until 
a  severe  illness  gave  him  warning  that  he  must  cease  from  such  strenuous  labor. 
He  made  the  attempt  and  that  he  might  have  some  time  for  rest  and  pleasure 
he  built  a  fine  home  at  Glen  Grayland,  on  the  South  Beach,  a  few  miles  from 
Cohassett,  a  beautiful  and  most  attractive  place,  overlooking  the  ocean.  The 
demands  for  his  professional  services,  however,  were  so  insistent  that  he  could 
get  away  from  professional  duties  only  at  rare  intervals  and  so  it  continued  until 
the  end.  As  a  surgeon  he  displayed  great  skill  and  was  spoken  of  by  Dr.  Dumon 
in  this  connection  as  "the  essence  of  power."  Dr.  Smits  acquired  his  financial  suc- 
cess in  Aberdeen  and  invested  his  money  in  the  state  and  Washington  had  no 
more  loyal  citizen  than  he. 

In  1904  Dr.  Smits  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Mary  McKinlay,  of  Aber- 
deen, and  they  became  the  parents  of  a  son..  Paul,  born  in  May,  1914.  Mrs.  Smits 
was  a  trained  nurse  and  was  her  husband's  assistant  in  his  surgery  cases. 

Attempting  to  rest  somewhat  from  his  labors,  Dr.  Smits  in  the  early  part  of 
August,  191 5,  went  to  Oregon  for  a  ten  days'  vacation,  accompanied  by  his  two 
brothers  and  a  friend,  and  only  the  day  of  his  death  had  returned  to  Aberdeen  when 
he  was  stricken  with  hemorrhage  of  the  brain  and  ])assed  away  at  the  hospital 
which  he  had  founded.  He  was  a  man  who  numbered  his  friends  by  the  hundred 
and  cemented  them  to  him  in  the  strongest  way  by  reason  of  his  splendid  char- 
acteristics and  his  kindly  spirit.  The  energy  and  activity  which  he  manifested  in 
his  professional  life  were  also  displayed  in  his  recreation.  He  hunted  and  fished  in 
the  same  intense  manner.  He  loved  the  great  outdoors  and  was  ever  happy  in 
the  study  of  fish,  fowl  and  bird  life  and  also  the  habits  of  other  animals  found 
in  the  district.  Around  Glen  Grayland  he  had  many  kinds  of  tame  birds  and 
fowls  and  there  were  beautiful  Indian  curios  and  mounted  skins  and  heads  in  his 
home.     He  had  gathered  together  a  beautiful  natural  history  collection  and  his 

Vol.  n— 9 


166  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

magnificent  collection  of  Indian  relics  was  awarded  the  prize  at  the  Seattle  fair. 
He  took  a  great  deal  of  pride  and  pleasure  in  his  home  at  the  beach  and  the 
group  of  buildings  upon  the  place  are  very  attractive  in  themselves  and,  moreover, 
are  surrounded  by  flowers  in  abundance.  The  main  building  is  constructed  of 
logs  and  has  a  living  room  thirty-six  by  forty  feet  and  there  are  also  a  number  of 
cottages  well  provided  with  guest  rooms.  His  life  had  much  of  pleasure  in  it 
because  of  the  breadth  of  his  interests  and  the  scope  of  his  wisdom  and  he  ever 
realized  that  the  keenest  joy  comes  from  intellectual  stimulus  and  activity.  His 
word  was  never  impeached,  he  held  friendship  inviolable  and  it  seemed  that  there 
was  no  phase  of  upright  and  honorable  manhood  and  citizenship  that  did  not  find 
expression  in  his  career.  His  physique  matched  his  greatness  of  mind  and  spirit, 
for  he  was  six  feet  in  height  and  well  proportioned.  Mrs.  Smits  and  her  son  made 
their  home  at  the  residence  at  the  beach  until  191)7,  when  they  removed  to  Aber- 
deen. 


JUDGE  FRANK  ALLYN. 

Washington  has  always  been  distinguished  by  the  high  rank  of  its  judiciary, 
and  prominent  among  those  who  have  served  on  the  supreme  court  bench  of  the 
state  was  Judge  Frank  Allyn,  of  Tacoma,  who  was  also  at  one  time  judge  of 
the  superior  court  of  Pierce  county.  He  was  born  in  Keokuk,  Iowa,  August  27, 
1846.  and  supplemented  his  public  school  education  by  study  in  Miami  Univer- 
sity, of  Oxford,  Ohio.  He  was  graduated  on  the  completion  of  a  law  course 
when  twenty-two  years  of  age  and  entered  the  law  office  of  Samuel  F.  Miller, 
associate  justice  of  the  United  States  for  thirty  years,  then  practicing  at  Keokuk. 
Judge  Allyn  there  spent  two  years  in  preparing  for  the  bar  and  was  admitted 
in  1870.  He  remained  a  practitioner  in  Iowa  until  1887,  when  he  came  to 
Tacoma  by  appointment  of  President  Cleveland  and  went  upon  the  bench  of  the 
supreme  court  of  the  territory,  proving  himself  the  peer  of  all  of  his  colleagues 
and  of  the  ablest  men  who  have  sat  in  the  court  of  last  resort  in  Washington. 
He  remained  one  of  the  supreme  judges  until  the  territory  was  admitted  into 
the  Union,  after  which  he  was  elected  judge  of  the  superior  court  of  Pierce 
county  for  a  term  of  four  years.  He  then  resumed  the  private  practice  of  law, 
in  which  he  continued  until  his  death  on  the  31st  of  March,  1909.  His  ability 
was  marked.  He  had  comprehensive  knowledge  of  the  law  and  notable  power 
in  correctly  applying  its  principles.  His  deductions  were  sound  and  logical, 
and  his  decisions  showed  marked  absence  of  personal  bias  or  prejudice.  For 
several  years  he  was  also  engaged  in  the  banking  business  in  Tacoma  and  the 
importance  of  his  professional  and  business  connections  established  him  as  one 
of  the  most  prominent  citizens  of  the  state. 

Judge  Allyn  was  married  in  St.  Louis,  Missouri,  to  Miss  Nellie  Turner,  a 
daughter  of  Judge  George  Turner,  who  at  the  early  age  of  thirty-two  years  was 
appointed  as  chief  justice  of  Nevada  by  President  Lincoln.  He  became  a  well 
known  mining  attorney  and  spent  his  last  days  in  San  Francisco,  dying  there 
at  the  age  of  fifty-two  years.  At  a  very  early  age  he  was  graduated  from  col- 
lege and  later  was   widely  known   for  his   scholarly  attainments.     He  traveled 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  167 

abroad  with  his  family  and  remained  there  for  several  years.  He  spent  con- 
siderable time  in  both  London  and  Paris  and  there  delivered  many  public  ad- 
dresses. He  entertained  very  extensively  while  abroad  and  was  recognized  as 
a  foremost  American  citizen.  He  was  a  very  brilliant  man  and  was  recognized 
as  one  of  the  most  distinguished  men  of  the  west.  His  widow,  who  has  now 
reached  an  advanced  age,  is  still  living  and  resides  in  Tacoma.  Their  only  child 
is  Mrs.  Allyn.  To  Judge  and  Mrs.  Allyn  was  born  one  child,  Frank,  Jr.,  who  is 
now  engaged  in  the  bond  and  insurance  business  in  Tacoma. 

Judge  Allyn  was  interested  in  every  phase  of  public  life  bearing  upon  the 
welfare  and  progress  of  city,  state  and  nation.  He  served  on  the  board  of 
regents  of  Washington  University,  and  he  was  one  of  the  original  trustees  and 
a  life  member  of  the  Ferry  Museum.  No  phase  of  Tacoma's  public  life  sought 
his  aid  in  vain.  In  Masonic  circles  he  was  very  prominent,  becoming  a  Mystic 
Shriner.  His  acquaintance  was  very  wide  and  the  sterling  traits  of  his  character 
established  his  position  ia  public  regard  and  carved  his  name  high  on  the  key- 
stone of  the  legal  arch  of  Washington.  He  possessed  a  high  sense  of  duty  and 
honor  and  never  swerved  from  the  high  standards  in  which  he  believed.  His 
was  a  nobility  of  character,  and  he  was  a  most  patient  judge. 


EDWARD  A.  FITZHENRY. 

Many  years  devoted  to  civil  engineering  have  well  qualified  Edward  A.  Fitz- 
Henry  to  efficiently  discharge  the  duties  of  the  office  which  he  now  holds, 
namely  that  of  United  States  surveyor  general  for  the  state  of  Washington. 
He  was  born  in  Bloomington,  Illinois,  and  is  a  son  of  Hiram  and  Elizabeth  Fitz- 
Henry.  He  attended  the  public  and  high  schools  of  his  native  city,  graduating 
from  the  high  school  in  1886.  Subsequently  he  was  for  a  year  a  student  in  the 
Illinois  Wesleyan  University  at  Bloomington  and  then  attended  the  State  Uni- 
versity at  Urbana.  Upon  leaving  college  he  secured  a  position  with  the  engineer- 
ing department  of  the  Lake  Erie  &  Western  Railroad,  but  after  remaining  in 
that  connection  for  two  years  came  to  Olympia,  Washington,  and  entered  the 
employ  of  the  Union  Pacific  Railroad  as  surveyor.  Six  months  later  he  removed 
to  Port  Angeles,  Washington,  where  he  engaged  in  civil  engineering.  In  1892 
he  was  elected  county  surveyor  and  upon  the  expiration  of  his  term  in  1896 
was  appointed  deputy  county  surveyor,  serving  until  1900.  From  1904  until  1908 
he  was  county  clerk  and  from  1908  until  191 2  was  county  engineer.  When  not 
holding  office  he  was  connected  with  the  engineering  departments  of  various  rail- 
roads and  also  did  some  survey  work  for  the  government.  He  did  irrigation  work 
in  various  parts  of  the  state  and  in  engineering  circles  he  gained  recognition  as 
one  of  the  leading  members  of  the  profession.  It  is  generally  conceded  thai 
President  Wilson  acted  wisely  in  appointing  him  United  States  surveyor  general 
for  the  state  of  Washington,  which  position  he  has  held  since  July  i,  1913. 

Mr.  FitzHenry  was  married  in  Port  Angeles  in  October,  1898,  to  Miss  Jessie 
V.  Crooks  and  they  have  a  daughter,  Phyllis,  who  is  now  a  high  school  student. 
The  democratic  party  has  a  stanch  supporter  in  Mr.  FitzHenry  but  nothing 
afifecting  the  general  welfare  is  a  matter  of  inditiference  to  him.     Fraternally 


168  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

he  belongs  to  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  in  reHgious  faith  is  a  Presbyterian. 
He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce.  While  doing  survey  work 
for  the  government,  he  reported  an  unnamed  mountain  peak  in  the  Olympian 
mountain  range,  laying  some  twenty  miles  south  and  west  of  Port  Angeles.  This 
mountain  has  an  elevation  of  seven  thousand  one  hundred  and  fifty  feet  and 
was  presumed  by  the  Press  Club  Explorers  to  be  Mount  Olympus  so  was  not 
given  a  name  by  this  exploration  party.  The  government  honored  Mr.  Fitz- 
Henry  by  naming  this  mountain  Mount  FitzHenry.  It  is  needless  to  say  that 
his  duties  as  surveyor  general  are  promptly,  faithfully  and  efficiently  discharged 
or  that  he  is  held  in  high  esteem  throughout  the  state  and  especially  by  the 
engineering  profession. 

His  paternal  ancestors  came  to  America  from  England  and  Scotland  at  an 
early  date.  The  first  George  settled  in  Mrginia  and  his  descendant  Enoch  par- 
ticipated in  the  War  of  the  Revolution  and  later  settled  in  Pennsylvania  and 
reared  a  large  family.  Enoch's  son  Edward,  Mr.  FitzHenry's  grandfather, 
settled  in  Ohio  and  later  moved  his  family  to  McLean  county,  Illinois.  Mr. 
FitzHenry  is  a  member  of  the  Isaac  I.  Stevens  Chapter  of  the  Sons  of  the  Ameri- 
can Revolution,  being  eligible  from  each  paternal  family  line. 


THOMAS  MORAN. 


Thomas  Moran,  of  Arlington,  has  been  closely  identified  with  the  develop- 
ment and  upbuilding  of  that  place.  In  fact  he  erected  the  second  building  in 
the  town  and  throughout  the 'intervening  period  he  has  been  well  known  as  a 
hotel  proprietor,  popular  with  his  guests  and  at  all  times  enterprising  and  progres- 
sive. Various  other  interests  have  also  claimed  his  attention  and  profited  by  his 
cooperation.  He  was  born  in  the  state  of  New  York,  June  7,  1847,  ^  son  of  Patrick 
and  Mary  (Moriarity)  Moran,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Ireland.  Crossing 
the  Atlantic  in  the  late  '30s,  they  settled  in  New  York  and  afterward  removed 
westward  to  Wisconsin.  They  were  married  prior  to  coming  to  the  new  world. 
In  early  manhood  the  father  engaged  in  masonry  work  in  the  east  and  after 
becoming  a  resident  of  tBe  Mississippi  valley  continued  in  the  same  line  at  Madison, 
Wisconsin,  where  he  established  his  home  in  1855.  He  worked  at  the  mason's  trade 
there  until  1871,  when  death  called  him,  at  which  time  he  had  reached  the  sixty- 
sixth  milestone  on  life's  journey.  Mrs.  Moran  long  survived  him  and  died  in 
Madison,  Wisconsin,  in  1901,  at  the  advanced  age  of  eighty  years. 

Thomas  Moran  was  the  seventh  in  order  of  birth  in  a  family  of  ten  children 
and  in  his  boyhood  days  he  attended  the  schools  of  Wisconsin  to  the  age  of  fifteen 
years,  when  in  response  to  the  country's  call  for  troops  he  enlisted  in  1862  as  a 
member  of  the  federal  army,  joining  Company  G  of  the  Twenty-ninth  Wisconsin 
Infantry.  He  continued  with  that  command  until  the  close  of  the  war  and  par- 
ticipated in  many  hotly  contested  engagements,  in  all  of  which  he  conducted 
himself  with  signal  dignity,  honor  and  valor.  He  did  not  lay  down  his  arms  until 
the  war  had  been  brought  to  a  close  and  in  the  meantime  he  had  participated  in 
the  Mcksburg  campaign,  the  Red  River  expedition,  the  capture  of  Mobile,  Ala- 
bama, and  many  of  the  important  battles  of  the  Ci\il  war.    He  was  never  wounded, 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  169 

although  frequently  in  the  thickest  of  the  fight,  and  he  was  honorably  discharged 
and  mustered  out  at  Shreveport,  Louisiana. 

When  the  country  no  longer  needed  his  military  aid  Mr.  Moran  returned 
to  his  home  in  Madison,  Wisconsin,  where  he  was  employed  in  various  lines  of 
business.  He  continued  his  residence  in  that  state  until  1871,  at  which  time  he 
entered  upon  a  career  of  railroad  construction  which  eventually  brought  him 
to  the  Pacific  coast.  He  worked  as  a  contractor  on  the  Northwestern  Railroad 
from  Madison  to  La  Crosse,  Wisconsin,  and  was  continuously  engaged  in  rail- 
road construction  work  until  1890,  when  he  reached  Arlington,  Washington.  He 
had  been  foreman  and  superintendent  of  construction  at  various  points  and  held, 
several  other  positions  of  a  similar  character.  He  had  the  superintendency  of  the 
Seatile,  Lake  Shore  &  Eastern  Railroad  from  Lake  Washington  through  Arling- 
ton to  McMurray,  and  when  the  road  was  completed  he  located  in  Arlington, 
where  he  built  the  first  hotel  and  instituted  the  pioneer  hardware  store.  On  the 
present  site  of  the  Runkel  store  he  erected  the  second  building  in  the  town.  After 
a  time  he  disposed  of  his  hardware  business  but  he  has  always  continued  in  the 
hotel  business.  He  erected  the  Moran  block,  one  of  the  modern  buildings  of 
Arlington,  in  1912.  It  is  a  two  story  structure  with  offices  on  the  second  floor. 
After  giving  up  the  hardware  business  he  established  and  promoted  the  Arlington 
Water,  Light  &  Power  Company,  which  utilizes  the  water  from  Jim  creek.  Of 
this  company  he  has  since  been  the  president  and  carefully  directs  the  interests  of 
the  business.  He  is  also  a  director  of  the  Citizens  State  Bank.  A  notable  point 
in  his  career  has  been  his  ability  to  quickly  perceive  the  advantages  of  any  busi- 
ness situation  and  utilize  these  to  the  best  possible  advantage.  He  has  recognized 
opportunity  for  the  acquirement  of  valuable  real  estate  and  has  added  to  his 
holdings  whenever  possible.  In  1892  he  took  a  homestead  on  the  Pilchuck  and 
since  then  he  has  purchased  three  other  ranches,  so  that  his  holdings  now  aggre- 
gate five  hundred  acres.  He  is  also  interested  to  some  extent  in  the  dairy  busi- 
ness, keeping  forty-three  head  of  milch  cows. 

In  February,  1881,  Mr.  Moran  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Avlena  Sick- 
man,  of  Muscatine  county,  Iowa,  a  daughter  of  Lewis  and  Mary  Sickman.  Her 
father  died  in  Iowa  in  19 10  and  her  mother  now  makes  her  home  with  Mrs. 
Moran  at  the  age  of  eighty-six  years.  Mrs.  Moran  was  born  in  Iowa  in  1864 
and  acquired  her  education  in  the  public  schools  of  that  state.  She  has  become 
the  mother  of  three  children :  Jesse  T.,  who  was  born  in  Muscatine  county, 
Iowa,  in  1883;  Mrs.  Larena  Stripp,  who  was  born  at  Woodinville  Junction, 
King  county,  Washington,  in  1890,  and  now  has  two  children,  Fred  and  Elizabeth, 
who  are  with  their  parents  in  Vancouver,  British  Columbia  ;  and  Elmer  Patrick, 
who  was  born  in  Arlington  in  1892.  He  married  Miss  Llazel  Winn  and  he  is  a 
ball  player  with  the  Tacoma  home  team. 

Mr.  Moran  gives  his  political  allegiance  to  the  democratic  party  and  has  he'.il 
the  ofiice  of  county  commissioner  of  Snohomish  county  for  four  years,  making  a 
most  creditable  record  by  the  prompt  and  faithful  manner  in  which  lie  discharges 
his  duties,  as  is  indicated  in  his  reelections.  He  has  also  been  school  director 
for  twelve  years  and  was  president  of  the  board  several  times.  Fraternally 
he  is  connected  with  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  Ijecoming  a  charter 
member  of  Everett  Lodge  No.  479.  His  religious  faith  is  that  of  the  Roman 
Catholic  church.    Mr.  Moran  left  home  without  a  dollar  but  he  realized  the  value 


170  ■        WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

of  industry  and  determination  as  active  factors  in  business  life  and  he  resolved 
to  win  success  if  it  could  be  done  through  honorable  efifort.  Diligence  and  per- 
sistency of  purpose  are  numbered  among  his  stalwart  characteristics  and  his  life 
record,  which  is  as  an  open  book  that  all  may  read,  has  brought  him  high  stand- 
ing and  popularity. 


SAMUEL  D.  CROCKETT. 

Samuel  D.  Crockett,  president  of  the  Seattle  Security  Company,  figures  promi- 
nently in  financial  circles,  where  his  name  has  become  a  synonym  for  enterprise 
and  advancement.  He  may  well  be  termed  a  man  of  affairs,  for  he  has  controlled 
and  directed  important  interests  which  feature  as  factors  in  the  upbuilding  of 
the  city  as  well  as  in  the  advancement  of  his  individual  success.  He  was  born 
in  Iowa,  June  23,  1850,  his  parents  being  John  and  Ann  Crockett,  the  latter  a 
native  of  Virginia.  His  surviving  sisters  and  brother  are  as  follows :  John 
Harvey,  who  is  engaged  in  the  real-estate  business  in  Bellingham,  Washington ; 
Mrs.  Mary  F.  Spencer,  a  widow  residing  in  Portland,  Oregon ;  Mrs.  Harry  A. 
Fairchild,  a  widow  who  makes  her  home  in  Seattle,  Washington;  Mrs.  Elizabeth 
Pettibone,  a  widow  living  in  Bellingham,  Washington ;  Mrs.  H.  G.  de  Pledge, 
of  Colfax,  Washington ;  and  Mrs.  Chauncey  J.  House,  of  Everett.  Washington. 

In  the  common  schools  Samuel  D.  Crockett  began  his  education.  He  accom- 
panied the  family  on  their  removal  to  the  west  in  1851,  the  family  home  being 
established  in  Olympia,  Washington.  He  supplemented  his  public-school  train- 
ing by  study  in  Willamette  University  at  Salem,  Oregon,  and  the  experiences  of 
his  early  life,  aside  from  those  of  the  schoolroom,  were  such  as  come  to  the  farm 
lad.  for  he  was  reared  amid  an  agricultural  environment  in  Washington.  In  1882 
he  arrived  in  Seattle,  where  he  engaged  in  the  manufacure  of  furniture  and  its 
sale  at  retail,  conducting  the  business  under  the  firm  name  of  Hall,  Paulson  & 
Company  on  Commercial  street,  now  First  avenue  South,  located  where  the 
Northern  Hotel  stands.  The  factory  was  at  the  foot  of  Commercial  street,  on 
the  present  site  of  the  Security  block.  As  time  passed  the  enterprise  continued  to 
prosper,  and  Mr.  Crockett  later  sold  an  interest  in  the  business  to  W.  R.  Forrest, 
at  which  time  it  was  incorporated  under  the  name  of  the  Hall  &  Paulson  Furni- 
ture Company.  This  was  a  close  corporation,  with  George  W.  Hall.  Paul  Paul- 
son, W.  R.  Forrest  and  S.  D.  Crockett  as  incorporators.  They  conducted  a  grow- 
ing and  profitable  business  until  1889,  when  their  establishment  was  destroyed  in 
the  great  fire  of  that  year  and  almost  their  entire  assets  were  wiped  out.  About 
all  that  was  left  was  mud  flats  covered  with  fourteen  feet  of  water.  In  1891  an 
act  was  passed  by  the  legislature  to  enable  those  who  had  made  improvements  on 
the  tide  flats  to  purchase  the  land.  The  furniture  company  at  once  purchased 
the  ground  which  had  been  occupied  by  their  plant  and  afterward  reincorporated 
as  the  Seattle  Security  Company.  This  company  erected  the  Security  block,  which 
is  a  four-story  brick  structure  with  a  frontage  of  two  hundred  and  ninety  feet 
and  one  hundred  and  fifty  feet  in  depth.  They  also  erected  the  brick  building 
now  occupied  by  the  Carstens  Packing  Company  on  the  adjoining  property  and 
which  is  also  a  four-story  and  basement  building.     The  officers  of  the  Security 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  171 

Company  are :  S.  D.  Crockett,  president  and  treasurer ;  Paul  Paulson,  vice  presi- 
dent ;  and  O.  W.  Crockett,  secretary. 

Mr.  Crockett  has  been  married  twice.  In  1873,  at  Salem,  Oregon,  he  wedded 
Miss  Lydia  E.  Chamberlin,  who  passed  away  in  December,  1907,  leaving  two 
children,  namely :  Oliver  W.,  the  secretary  of  the  Seattle  Security  Company 
and  a  stockholder  in  the  firm  of  James  Bothwell  &  Crockett,  real  estate,  loans  and 
insurance ;  and  Bertha  Ann,  who  is  the  wife  of  Ernest  C.  Jenner,  a  newspaper 
artist  on  The  Times.  On  the  19th  of  November,  1909,  in  Seattle,  Samuel  D. 
Crockett  married  Mrs.  Nellie  V.  Wood. 

In  politics  Mr.  Crockett  has  never  been  active  but  recognizes  the  duties  and 
obligations  of  citizenship  and  neglects  no  responsibility  that  comes  to  him  in  that 
connection.  Practically  his  entire  life  has  been  spent  in  the  northwest,  and  for 
more  than  six  decades  he  has  been  a  witness  of  the  growth  and  progress 
of  Washington.  Since  coming  to  Seattle  in  1882  he  has  figured  continuously 
in  its  business  circles,  taking  advantage  of  every  legitimate  opportunity  that  has 
come  his  way  and  proceeding  step  by  step  to  the  plane  of  affluence  whereon  he  is 
now  to  be  found.  The  property  interests  of  the  company  return  to  him  a  good 
income  and  throughout  his  entire  career  he  has  never  sacrificed  his  good  name  to 
advancement  nor  success. 


CLAUDE  E.  STAGE. 


Claude  E.  Stage,  cashier  of  the  Granite  Falls  State  Bank  and  a  valued  resi- 
dent of  Granite  Falls,  was  born  at  Yates,  Manistee  county,  Michigan,  January 
14,  1885.  His  father,  Arza  C.  Stage,  a  native  of  Pennsylvania,  was  born  near 
Nashville  and  was  a  representative  of  a  family  of  Dutch  descent  long  estab- 
lished in  the  Keystone  state.  The  grandfather  came  from  Holland  and  the  family 
home  was  maintained  in  Pennsylvania  until  Arza  C.  Stage  removed  to  Michigan, 
where  he  became  a  successful  agriculturist  and  dairyman.  He  voted  with  the 
democratic  party  and  was  very  active  in  political  affairs.  It  was  subsequent 
to  his  removal  to  the  west  that  he  married  Stella  E.  Lameroux,  a  native  of 
Cedar  Springs,  Michigan,  whose  father  was  a  Civil  war  veteran.  The  death 
of  Mr.  Stage  occurred  in  Yates,  Michigan,  in  1900,  when  he  was  forty-six  years 
of  age,  and  his  widow  is  now  living  in  Granite  Falls.  In  the  family  were  four 
children  who  are  yet  living. 

Claude  E.  Stage,  the  second  of  the  number,  acquired  his  education  in  the 
public  schools  of  Yates,  Michigan,  and  of  Granite  Falls,  Washington,  the  family 
removing  to  this  state  in  1903.  He  made  his  initial  step  as  clerk  with  a  mer- 
cantile company  of  Granite  Falls  and  afterward  entered  the  Granite  Falls  State 
Bank,  of  which  for  four  years  he  was  receiver  and  bookkeeper  and  for  two  years 
assistant  cashier.  During  the  past  four  years  he  has  been  cashier  and  his 
ability  and  loyalty  in  this  connection  have  contributed  much  to  the  success 
of  the  institution,  of  which  he  is  one  of  the  stockholders.  He  is  also  financially 
interested  in  a  shingle  manufactory  and  is  recognized  as  one  of  the  progres- 
sive young  business  men  of  his  part  of  the  county. 

On  the  25th  of  December,  1910.  in  Granite  Falls,  Mr.  Stage  was  married  to 


172  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

Miss  Bessie  Burroughs  Taylor,  who  passed  away  on  the  6th  of  March,  1915, 
at  Granite  Falls,  when  thirty-one  years  of  age.  She  was  a  native  of  Virginia 
and  a  daughter  of  John  A.  Taylor.  She  left  one  son,  Donald  Eugene,  who  was 
born  October  4,  191 1. 

Mr.  Stage  gives  his  political  support  to  the  republican  party  and  does  all  in  his 
power  to  promote  its  growth  and  insure  its  success  because  of  a  firm  belief  in  its 
principles.  For  the  past  six  years  he  has  served  as  treasurer  of  Granite  Falls 
and  he  gives  stalwart  support  to  all  those  interests  which  tend  to  uphold  civic 
virtue  and  civic  pride.  He  has  membership  in  the  Modern  Woodmen  camp  at 
Granite  Falls  and  is  manager  of  the  Modern  Woodmen  Hall.  His  religious  belief 
is  that  of  the  Congregational  church  and  his  life  is  guided  by  high  and  honorable 
principles.  His  success  is  due  to  his  persistent  effort,  and  determination  and 
energy  have  enabled  him  to  overcome  obstacles  and  difficulties  in  his  path.  Those 
who  know  him  and  have  watched  his  course  in  every  relation  of  life  entertain 
for  him  warm  respect  and  high  regard. 


ROLAND  HILL  HARTLEY. 

Roland  Hill  Hartley,  of  Everett,  business  man  and  political  leader,  has  left 
the  impress  of  his  individuality  and  ability  upon  the  history  of  the  state  in  many 
ways.  Holding  to  the  highest  ideals  in  citizenship,  he  has  been  actuated  by  the 
spirit  of  Henry  Clay  when  he  said  that  he  "would  rather  be  right  than  president." 
Mr.  Hartley  has  never  catered  to  any  class,  but  has  stood  firmly  for  his  honest 
convictions,  and  his  viewpoint  is  that  of  the  broadminded  man  who  thoroughly 
studies  a  situation  and  bases  his  opinions  upon  every  phase  of  the  case.  In  the 
business  world  he  has  accomplished  what  he  has  undertaken  and  thirty  years  of 
unremitting  labor  have  brought  him  to  a  substantial  position  as  the  president  of 
the  Everett  Logging  Company,  the  vice  president  of  a  shingle  manufacturing  con- 
cern operating  under  the  name  of  the  Clough-Hartley  Company  and  a  stock- 
holder in  the  Clark-Nickerson  Lumber  Company. 

Colonel  Hartley  is  of  Canadian  birth.  The  date  and  place  of  his  nativity  are 
June  26,  1864,  and  Shogomoc,  York  county,  New  Brunswick.  His  father,  Edward 
Williams  Hartley,  who  was  born  on  a  farm  at  Shogomoc  in  1820,  devoted  his  life 
to  agricultural  pursuits  and  to  the  work  of  the  ministry.  He  was  a  cousin  of 
the  late  Marcellus  Hartley,  of  Philadelphia,  and  is  descended  from  the  Hartleys 
who  originally  settled  near  Philadelphia,  there  planting  the  parent  stem  of  all  the 
different  branches  of  the  family  in  the  new  world.  Rev.  Edward  Williams  Hart- 
ley wedded  Miss  Rebecca  Barker  Whitehead,  also  a  native  of  York  county,  New 
Brunswick,  and  a  second  cousin  of  Andrew  Jackson,  the  seventh  president  of 
the  L^nited  States.  They  became  the  parents  of  twelve  children,  nine  sons  and 
three  daughters. 

This  number  included  Roland  Hill  Hartley,  who  in  his  youth  had  little  oppor- 
tunity of  attending  school.  His  father  died  when  the  son  was  but  fourteen  years 
of  age  and  he  was  obliged  to  go  to  work.  He  was  for  some  time  "cookee"  in  a 
lumber  camp  in  the  pineries  in  northern  Minnesota  and  his  duties  included  cutting 
wood  and  washing  dishes.     During  the  winter  months  he  was  in  the  woods  but 


ROLAND  H.  HARTLEY 


.-    THE   NEW   YORK 
PUBLIC  LIBRARY 

ASTOR,    LENOX 
TILDEN   FOUNDATION 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  175 

in  the  summer  spent  his  time  breaking  land  in  the  Red  River  valley,  being  one 
of  the  very  first  to  break  the  sod  in  Dakota  territory.  He  plowed  land  with 
oxen  where  the  town  of  Hope,  North  Dakota,  is  now  located  and  for  five  years 
engaged  in  breaking  the  prairie  sod.  His  father,  although  unable  to  give  him 
many  school  advantages,  early  taught  him  to  work  and  the  ability  to  get  things 
done  which  has  characterized  all  of  his  later  life  was  manifested  in  his  boy- 
hood. His  experiences  in  the  north  still  further  developed  his  efificiency  and 
grasp  of  practical  things  and  it  early  became  recognized  that  he  accomplished 
that  which  he  undertook.  At  length  he  became  bookkeeper  for  a  large  lumber 
firm  in  Minnesota  and  afterwards,  about  1894,  he  engaged  in  the  manufac- 
ture of  boots  and  shoes  in  Minneapolis. 

For  a  year  he  was  a  student  in  the  Minneapolis  Academy  and  made  such 
an  excellent  record  there  that  he  was  offered  and  accepted  the  position  of 
secretary  of  the  mayor  of  Brainerd,  Minnesota,  so  serving  in  1884.  His  expe- 
rience in  that  connection  aroused  in  him  an  interest  in  public  questions  and 
political  situations  that  has  never  waned  through  all  the  intervening  years — • 
years  in  which  he  has  stood  for  the  highest  ideals  in  citizenship,  supporting 
every  measure  that  has  been  a  matter  of  civic  virtue  and  civic  pride.  In  1897 
he  was  called  to  the  position  of  secretary  to  the  governor  of  Minnesota  and 
acted  in  that  capacity  for  two  years,  while  for  eight  years  he  was  on  the  staff 
of  the  commander  in  chief  of  the  military  forces  of  Minnesota,  holding  the 
rank  of  colonel  and  serving  as  aid-de-camp.  When  the  Spanish- American  war 
broke  out  as  the  representative  of  the  state  he  accompanied  the  first  Minnesota 
regiment  that  went  south  and  later  was  assigned  to  care  for  the  sick  and 
wounded  of  his  state,  displaying  remarkable  executive  ability  in  transporting 
them  from  field  hospitals  to  city  hospitals.  In  1898  he  was  in  charge  of  two 
battery  companies  sent  to  defend  northern  Minnesota  during  the  Indian  upris- 
ing, in  which  the  Third  United  States  Infantry  had  been  badly  defeated  at 
Sugar  Point,  on  Leech  lake. 

Colonel  Flartley  became  a  resident  of  Everett,  Washington,  in  1903  and 
through  the  intervening  period  has  been  engaged  in  the  lumber  business  in  the 
northwest,  controlling  important  interests  as  president  of  the  Everett  Logging 
Company  and  as  vice  president  of  the  Clough-Hartley  Company,  shingle  manu- 
facturers. He  also  holds  stock  in  the  Clark-Nickerson  Lumber  Company  and 
has  other  business  interests,  the  value  of  which  indicates  his  wisdom  and  judg- 
ment in  making  investments  and  managing  important  industrial  and  commercial 
affairs.  All  days  in  his  business  career,  however,  have  not  been  equally  bright. 
Indeed,  in  his  experience  he  has  seen  the  gathering  of  clouds  that  threatened 
disastrous  storms,  but  his  rich  inheritance  of  energy  and  pluck  has  enabled  him 
to  turn  defeat  into  victory  and  promised  failures  into  success.  His  strict  integ- 
rity, business  conservatism  and  judgment  have  always  been  uniformly  recog- 
nized and  he  has  enjoyed  public  confidence  to  an  enviable  degree,  bringing  him 
a  lucrative  patronage.  It  is  a  recognized  fact  that  he  has  always  been  a  worker 
and  is  not  afraid  of  work. 

On  the  22d  of  August,  1888,  in  Minneapolis,  Minnesota,  Colonel  flartley 
was  married  to  Miss  Nina  M.  Clough,  a  daughter  of  ex-Governor  David  Mar- 
ston  Clough,  whose  name  is  inseparably  interwoven  with  the  history  of  Minne- 
sota.     He   married    Miss   Adelaide   Barton,   a   cousin   of   Clara    Barton   of    Red 


176  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

Cross  fame.  Governor  and  Airs.  Clough  are  now  residing  in  Everett,  Washing- 
ton. Colonel  and  Mrs.  Hartley  have  become  the  parents  of  two  sons  and  a 
daughter:  Edward  Williams  and  David  Marston,  aged  respectively  twenty- 
three  and  nineteen  years,  both  attending  Yale  College ;  and  Mary,  seven  years  of 
age. 

The  family  usually  attend  the  Congregational  church  and  Colonel  Hartley 
is  a  prominent  Mason  and  is  connected  with  various  other  fraternal  and  social 
organizations.  He  served  as  master  of  Cataract  Lodge,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  in 
Minneapolis  in  1898,  was  high  priest  of  St.  Anthony's  Falls  Chapter,  R.  A.  M., 
in  1897,  became  a  member  of  Adoniram  Council,  No.  5,  R.  &  S.  M.,  was  conj- 
mander  of  Darius  Commandery,  No.  7,  K.  T.,  in  1892  and  ten  years  later  became 
grand  commander  of  Knights  Templar  of  Minnesota.  He  was  also  master  of 
Minneapolis  Consistory,  No.  2,  A.  A.  S.  R.,  in  1897  and  was  potentate  of  Zuhrah 
Temple,  A.  A.  O.  N.  M.  S..  at  Minneapolis  in  1895.  He  was  elected  Knight  com- 
mander of  the  Court  of  Honor  at  St.  Louis  in  1893  and  was  honored  with  the 
thirt)^-third  degree  in  \\'ashington,  D.  C,  in  1897.  He  is  likewise  a  member  of 
the  Royal  Order  of  Scotland,  of  Washington,  D.  C,  with  home  lodge  at  Edin- 
burgh, Scotland,  and  he  has  membership  with  the  Elks  and  with  the  Hoo  Hoos. 
He  has  been  made  an  honorary  member  of  John  Wanabo  Camp  of  Spanish  War 
Veterans  at  Everett.  Politically  a  republican  since  age  conferred  upon  him  the 
right  of  franchise,  he  has  always  taken  an  active  interest  in  politics,  recognizing  the 
duties  and  obligations  as  well  as  the  privileges  and  opportunities  of  citizenship.  In 
1910  he  was  elected  mayor  of  Everett,  which  position  he  filled  for  two  years,  and 
such  was  his  official  record  that  in  191 5  he  was  elected  to  represent  the  forty-eighth 
district  in  the  Washington  state  legislature.  While  there  he  studied  closely  every 
question  and  every  phase  of  every  problem  that  he  believed  had  to  do  wath  the  wel- 
fare of  the  people  and  the  upbuilding  of  the  commonwealth.  He  saw  abuses  and  he 
saw  wonderful  chances  for  improvement  in  public  service  and  at  the  republican  con- 
vention in  Snohomish  county,  April  29,  1916,  he  said :  "While  serving  in  this  legis- 
lature I 'saw  such  splendid  opportunities  for  an  executive  possessing  the  courage 
of  his  convictions  and  not  afraid,  that  I  found  myself  .longing  to  be  governor  of 
Washington  for  just  one  term  of  four  years.  I  think  it  was,  at  least  partly,  in 
deference  to  this  desire  of  mine  that  I  was  asked  at  a  republican  gathering  in 
this  city  about  a  year  ago  to  become  a  candidate  for  that  high  office.  Responding 
to  the  sentiment  at  that  meeting,  I  said  I  would  carefully  consider  the  matter  and 
publicly  make  know^n  my  decision,  so  will  take  advantage  of  this  opportunity  to 
say  that  I  wish  to  announce  that  I  am  a  candidate."  Strong  endorsement  came 
to  Colonel  Hartley  from  various  points  of  the  state  and  at  the  primaries  he  received 
the  second  highest  vote  among  eight  candidates.  He  made  various  addresses 
throughout  the  state.  They  were  the  talk  of  a  practical  business  man,  dealing 
with  the  business  of  the  state  in  a  practical,  common  sense  manner.  In  this  con- 
nection the  Everett  Tribune  wrote  of  him :  ''Hartley  can  hardly  be  considered  a 
party  candidate.  He  is  a  man  who  stands  for  so  much  that  is  above  party,  that 
is  clean  and  fearless  in  business  and  in  politics,  for  so  much  that  the  people  want 
in  their  representatives,  that  the  people  of  his  home  town  and  his  home  county 
believe  in  him  regardless  of  party  affiliations  because  they  know  him  as  a  man." 
One  of  the  Seattle  papers  said :  "Everything  Colonel  Hartley  says  at  any  time 
is  interesting.    He  is  an  interesting  personality.    He  always  speaks  his  mind  freely 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  177 

and  without  evasion ;  his  convictions  are  strong  and  enduring  and  he  is  ever  ready 
to  stand  by  them.  Few  men  in  pubHc  life  in  this  state  are  less  secretive,  less 
influenced  by  the  subtle  conventions  of  politics.  He  knows  what  he  thinks  and  he 
doesn't  hesitate  about  expressing  himself  in  plain  language.  Colonel  Hartley's 
announcement  ought  to  be  read  by  every  business  man  in  the  state.  They  will  not 
all  vote  for  him — but  his  statement,  devoid  of  vote-catching  phrases,  rings  true  and 
clear;  its  candor  is  refreshing.  One  paragraph  of  the  many  which  is  well  worth 
reading,  is  as  follows :  'Our  state  has  been  tormented  in  the  past  by  certain  agita- 
tors, who,  relying  upon  the  natural  characteristic  of  the  human  being  to  blame 
the  other  fellow  for  every  mistake  or  failure,  have  travelled  about,  preaching  envy, 
hate,  jealousy  and  destruction,  in  order  that  they  may  draw  fat  salaries  and  pose 
as  the  emancipators  of  labor.  The  way  to  best  help  labor  is  to  free  it  from  the 
yoke  imposed  by  those  self-appointed  disciples  of  discord  and  confusion.'  "  When 
speaking  before  the  Washington  State  Press  Association  he  said :  "Reference 
has  been  made  to  my  stand  as  regards  union  labor.  I  want  you  gentlemen  to  dis- 
tinctly understand  that  I  have  no  quarrel  whatever  with  union  labor.  I  consider 
that  every  man  has  a  perfect  right  to  belong  to  a  union  if  he  so  desires,  but  I  deny 
union  labor  the  right  to  say  that  a  man  must  belong  to  a  union  before  he  can 
go  out  and  earn  the  bread  to  feed  his  wife  and  children.  I,  as  a  candidate  for 
governor,  believe  that  the  people  should  know  exactly  where  I  stand  upon  such 
matters.  It  is  not  just  or  right  that  I  should  be  a  candidate  of  any  particular 
organization.  I  tell  you  now  that  if  I  am  honored  by  being  elected  governor  that 
every  man,  no  matter  whether  he  be  union  or  non-union,  will  be  protected  in  his 
right  to  work  when  and  where  he  pleases."  Other  questions  Colonel  Hartley 
attacked  with  equal  fearlessness  and  with  equal  clearness  as  to  his  position.  The 
Pacific  Baptist  said:  "Three  qualities  predominate  in  the  character  of  Colonel 
Hartley :  convictions,  courage  and  capability.  In  his  official  and  social  relations  he 
stands  for  high  ideals  and  good  citizenship.  He  never  asks,  Ts  it  popular?'  but  'Is 
it  right  and  best  for  the  public  welfare  ?'    This  little  trait  tells  the  entire  story." 


M.   M.  WALK. 


M.  M.  Walk,  one  of  the  owners  of  the  Economy  Wet  Wash  Laundry  and 
an  energetic  and  representative  business  man  of  Bellingham,  was  born  in  Salem, 
Oregon,  in  1881,  a  son  of  Charles  L.  and  Hattie  (Masterson)  Walk.  His 
maternal  grandfather,  James  Masterson,  was  a  pioneer  of  the  northwest,  arriv- 
ing at  the  Rogue  river  in  1851.  He  took  part  in  the  gold  rush  of  those  early 
days  3nd  later  was  United  States  marshal  for  Idaho  for  a  considerable  period. 
At  length  in  1872  he  took  up  his  residence  at  Snohomish  and  turned  his  atten- 
tion to  logging,  but  during  his  last  years  resided  upon  a  ranch  in  eastern  Wash- 
ington. Charles  Walk,  the  grandfather  of  our  subject,  removed  from  North 
Carolina  to  California  in  1849  at  the  time  of  the  gold  excitement.  He  lived  on 
the  Pacific  coast  until  his  death,  which  occurred  in  San  Francisco. 

M.  M.  Walk  has  resided  in  Washington  since  1892  and  as  he  was  then  a 
boy  of  but  eleven  years  he  continued  his  education  in  the  schools  of  this  state 
for  a  considerable  period.     For  fifteen  years  he  made  his  home  in  Seattle  and 


178  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

for  some  time  was  employed  in  the  Seattle  Laundry,  where  he  gained  experi- 
ence that  has  been  of  great  value  to  him  in  his  present  business  relation.  He 
also  followed  the  sea  for  twelve  years  and  held  a  master's  certificate.  For  some 
time  he  was  connected  with  the  transport  service  to  Manila  and  also  visited 
other  ports  in  the  orient,  in  which  connection  he  had  many  interesting  experi- 
ences. 

On  abandoning  a  seafaring  life  Mr.  Walk  came  to  Bellingham  in  191 3.  On 
the  nth  of  August  of  that  year  he  joined  J.  E.  Masterson  in  establishing  the 
Economy  Wet  Wash  Laundry  and  has  since  given  his  undivided  time  and  atten- 
tion to  the  management  of  that  enterprise,  which  is  one  of  the  leading  indus- 
tries of  its  kind  in  the  city.  The  plant  which  the  company  erected  is  thirty-six 
by  eighty-five  feet  in  dimensions,  with  an  engine  room  twenty-five  by  thirty-six 
feet.  The  most  modern  laundry  machinery  has  been  installed  and  the  plant 
has  its  own  power  system.  Eight  people  are  employed  and  two  automobiles 
are  used  for  the  collection  and  delivery  of  laundry.  In  addition  to  doing  a  large 
business  in  Bellingham  the  company  has  built  up  a  gratifying  patronage  in 
Ferndale  and  other  towns  in  this  locality.  The  company  makes  a  specialty  of 
wet  wash  laundry  but  is  equipped  to  do  mangle  and  rough  dry  work  and  the  rapid 
growth  in  their  patronage  has  been  based  upon  excellent  service.  The  plant  has 
a  capacity  of  four  tons  a  week  and  although  the  business  has  been  in  existence 
for  only  four  years  it  is  now  taking  care  of  three  tons  per  week.  The  energy, 
sound  business  judgment  and  practical  knowledge  of  the  business  possessed 
by  Mr.  Walk  have  been  important  factors  in  the  success  of  the  company  and 
he  is  recognized  as  a  valuable  addition  to  the  ranks  of  local  business  men. 

Mr.  Walk  was  married  in  Seattle  in  1907  to  Miss  Helen  C.  Smith,  of  that 
city,  and  they  have  a  daughter,  Helen  I.  He  supports  the  candidates  of  the 
Republican  party  at  the  polls  but  is  not  otherwise  active  in  politics.  Frater- 
nally he  is  a  Master  Mason  and  the  principles  of  that  order  guide  his  life  in  its 
various  relations.  He  has  few  interests  outside  of  his  business,  which  has 
grown  rapidly  and  makes  heavy  demands  upon  his  time  and  energy.  His  ability 
and  worth  are  generally  recognized  and  he  has  already  gained  a  large  number 
of  warm  personal  friends. 


OWEN  TAYLOR.  M.  D. 

Dr.  Owen  Taylor,  physician  and  surgeon,  came  to  Kent,  August  22,  1895, 
following  his  graduation  from  the  Bellevue  Hospital  Medical  College  of  New 
Vork.  He  has  here  since  maintained  a  private  hospital  and  his  practice  has 
been  attended  with  notable  success.  He  was  born  near  Cedar  Rapids,  Iowa, 
December  31,  1866,  and  there  attended  the  public  schools,  while  in  1888  he 
made  his  way  to  Seattle  and  entered  the  University  of  Washington.  Three 
years  were  devoted  to  study  in  that  institution  and  in  1891  he  went  to  New 
York,  taking  post  graduate  work  in  the  Bellevue  Hospital  Medical  College,  from 
which  he  was  graduated  in  1895.  He  chose  Kent  as  the  scene  of  his  labors  and 
at  once  entered  upon  practice  in  this  city.  Soon  afterward  he  opened  a  private 
hospital,  which  he  owns  and  which  is  conducted  under  the  name  of  the  Kent 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  179 

General  Hospital.  It  has  accommodations  for  twenty-two  patients  and  his  prac- 
tice is  largely  surgical,  in  which  branch  of  the  profession  he  is  particularly 
skilled. 

In  1909  Dr.  Taylor  left  Kent  for  an  extended  tour  around  the  world  and  at 
Wells,  England,  met  Miss  Anna  Hamm,  also  of  Kent,  and  who  at  that  time  was 
touring  Europe.  They  were  married  at  Wells,  England,  on  the  14th  of  Feb- 
ruary, 1910,  and  have  become  parents  of  two  children,  John  O.  and  Edward  O., 
aged  respectively  six  and  two  years. 

Fraternally  Dr.  Taylor  is  connected  with  the  Masons  and  has  attained  high 
rank  in  the  order,  belonging  to  the  Knight  Templar  commandery  at  Seattle  and 
to  Afifi  Temple  of  the  Mystic  Shrine  at  Tacoma.  In  politics  he  is  a  stanch 
republican,  believing  firmly  in  the  principles  of  the  party  and  seeking  to  fur- 
ther its  success  in  every  legitimate  way,  yet  he  has  never  been  an  office  seeker. 
His  sterling  personal  worth  and  his  high  professional  skill  commend  him  to 
the  confidence,  goodwill  and  friendship  of  all  with  whom  he  comes  in  contact, 
and  the  profession  as  well  as  the  public  acknowledges  his  superior  ability, 
especially  in  the  field  of  surgery. 


ISAAC  INGALLS  STEVENS. 

As  long  as  the  state  of  Washington  shall  endure  so  long  will  the  name  of  Isaac 
Ingalls  Stevens  be  held  in  honor,  for  as  the  first  governor  of  the  territory  and 
delegate  to  congress  he  largely  shaped  its  early  development.  His  heroic  death 
was  a  fitting  close  to  his  life  of  whole-hearted  and  aggressive  public  service, 
for  he  fell  fatally  wounded  while  leading  a  charge  at  the  battle  of  Chantilly  in 
the  Civil  war.  He  was  born  on  the  25th  of  March,  1818,  at  North  Andover. 
Massachusetts,  and  when  only  five  years  of  age  started  to  school.  After  the  age 
of  ten  years  he  attended  Franklin  Academy  at  North  Andover,  for  some  time  and 
then  decided  to  leave  school  for  a  time.  He  entered  the  woolen  mills  in  Andover 
owned  by  his  uncle  and  at  the  end  of  one  year  was  so  proficient  in  his  work 
that  he  could  manage- four  looms  at  a  time.  When  fifteen  years  old  he  entered 
the  famous  Phillips  Academy  in  Andover,  which  he  attended  for  a  year.  Dur- 
ing that  time  he  worked  at  whatever  he  could  find  to  do  and  thus  paid  his  own 
expenses.  He  received  an  appointment  as  a  cadet  at  West  Point  and  completed 
the  four  years'  course  at  that  institution,  standing  at  the  head  of  his  class  in 
every  study.  Upon  his  graduation  he  was  made  second  lieutenant  of  engineers  and 
was  ordered  to  proceed  to  Newport,  Rhode  Island,  to  take  part  in  the  building 
of  Fort  Adams.  In  July,  1840,  he  was  promoted  to  first  lieutenant  and  in  the 
following  year  was  sent  to  New  Bedford,  Massachusetts,  to  take  charge  of  re- 
pairing the  old  fort  there.  The  next  few  years  were  spent  at  Portsmouth  and 
Bucksport,  Maine,  where  he  built  Fort  Knot  at  the  narrows  of  the  Penobscot 
river.  He  served  in  the  Mexican  war  on  the  staff  of  General  Scott  as  engineer 
officer  and  as  adjutant  of  that  corps,  took  ])art  in  the  battles  of  Cerro  Gordo, 
Contreras,  Churubusco  and  Chapultepec,  and  was  severely  wounded  in  the  last 
named.  Fie  was  brevetted  captain  for  gallantry  in  the  battle  of  Contreras  and 
Churubusco,  and  major  for  gallantry  in  the  battle  of  Chapultepec.     Forced  by 


180  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

his  wound  to  leave  the  field,  he  returned  to  the  charge  of  the  fortifications  in 
Maine  and  New  Hampshire.  In  October,  1849,  he  was  placed  at  the  head  of  the 
United  States  coast  survey  office  in  Washington,  and  continued  in  this  important 
post  until  ]^Iarch  21,  1853,  when  he  resigned  from  the  army  and  accepted  the 
commission  of  governor  of  the  newly  created  territory  of  Washington  and  ex- 
officio  superintendent  of  Indian  afifairs. 

The  national  administration  having  undertaken  the  exploration  and  survey 
of  the  vast  and  then  almost  unknown  region  between  the  Mississippi  and  the 
Pacific  to  determine  the  practicability  of  railroad  routes  across  the  continent, 
Governor  Stevens  applied  for  and  was  placed  in  charge  of  the  northern  route, 
which,  being  the  least  known  and  invested  by  powerful  and  predatory  Indian  tribes, 
Sioux,  Crows,  Blackfeet  and  others,  was  justly  considered  the  most  difficult  and 
important.  In  one  month  he  completely  organized  the  expedition.  Leaving 
Washington  on  ]\Iay  9,  1853,  he  started  westward  from  St.  Paul,  Minnesota, 
with  the  main  party  on  June  i,  throwing  a  subsidiary  party  up  the  Missouri 
river,  and  two  subsidiary  parties  to  work  on  the  Pacific  end,  a  force  all  told  of 
tw^o  hundred  and  forty,  including  eleven  officers  and  seventy-six  soldiers  of  the 
army.  In  five  months  and  nineteen  days  he  arrived  at  Olympia  on  Puget-sound, 
having  traversed  and  explored  a  region  two  thousand  miles  long  and  two  hundred 
miles  wide,  examined  nine  passes  in  the  Rocky  mountains,  ascertained  the  naviga- 
bility of  the  upper  Missouri  and  Columbia  rivers,  held  friendly  councils  wath  the 
Indians  and  secured  an  immense  amount  of  information  regarding  the  botany, 
fauna,  physical  features,  productions,  climate,  etc.,  of  the  country  explored. 

His  first  act  as  governor  was  to  issue  a  proclamation  calling  for  the  election 
of  a  delegate  to  congress  and  of  members  of  the  first  territorial  legislature,  which 
he  summoned  to  meet  in  Olympia  in  February,  1854.  He  next  visited  the  Indian 
tribes  around  Puget  Sound  and  made  a  study  of  the  general  character  of  the 
harbors.  As  a  result  of  his  investigation  into  the  lay  of  the  country  he  decided 
that  Seattle  was  the  logical  terminus  for  the  new  trans-continental  railroad.  He 
recommended  to  the  legislature,  which  met  pursuant  to  his  call  in  February, 
1854,  the  adoption  of  a  code  of  laws,  the  organization  of  the  country  east  of  the 
Cascades  into  counties,  the  establishment  of  a  school  system  with  the  provision 
for  military  training  in  the  higher  schools  and  the  organization  of  a  militia.  The 
legislature  passed  laws  embodying  all  these  suggestions  save  the  one  regarding 
the  militia.  The  failure  of  the  law-making  body  to  provide  for  such  an  armed 
force  was  shown  to  have  been  unfortunate  two  years  later,  when  the  Indian 
insurrection  broke  out  and  it  had  to  be  put  down  by  the  pioneer  volunteer  force. 

At  the  close  of  the  first  session  of  the  legislature  Governor  Stevens  went  to 
Washington,  D.  C,  to  make  his  report  to  the  government  concerning  his  con- 
clusion in  regard  to  the  best  route  and  terminus  for  the  proposed  railroad  and 
also  to  urge  upon  congress  the  claims  of  the  new  territory.  When  he  returned 
to  the  coast  he  brought  his  wife  and  four  children  with  him  and  for  some  time 
the  governor's  family  lived  in  a  long,  one-story,  unplastered  building.  They 
endured  the  same  hard  and  trying  experiences  as  the  other  pioneers  of  the  terri- 
tory and  were  imbued  with  the  same  confident  faith  in  the  great  future  of  this  sec- 
tion of  the  country.  Governor  Stevens  made  many  treaties  with  the  Indians  and 
took  many  long,  fatiguing  expeditions  into  the  then  almost  unexplored  hinterland 
and  more  than  once  his  life  was  in  great  danger  from  disafifected  Indians.    At  one 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  181 

time  all  the  chief  tribes  of  the  upper  Columbia  country,  including  the  Cayuses, 
the  Walla  Wallas,  the  Yakimas,  the  Palouses,  the  Umatillas  and  all  the  Oregon 
Indian  bands  down  to  The  Dalles  made  open  war  upon  the  whites.  Governor 
Stevens  with  a  small  party  of  twenty-five  men  was  one  day's  march  from  Fort 
Benton  on  the  Missouri  river  on  his  return  after  holding  a  successful  council 
with  the  dreaded  Blackfeet  and  other  Indians  when  his  expressman,  exhausted 
from  his  perilous  and  arduous  ride  from  Olympia,  staggered  into  camp,  bringing 
news  of  the  Indian  outbreak  and  letters  from  other  territorial  officers  and  friends 
urging  him  to  descend  the  Missouri  and  return  to  the  territory  by  way  of  the 
Isthmus  of  Panama,  and  informing  him  that  thousands  of  Indians  were  in  arms, 
besetting  all  the  trails,  and  that  it  was  impossible  to  get  through  or  past  them. 
Scorning  this  advice  Governor  Stevens  by  rapid  marches  and  the  aid  of  friendly 
Indians  forced  his  way  over  all  obstacles,  crossing  the  Rocky  and  the  Bitter  Root 
mountains  in  midwinter  and  rescuing  a  party  of  twenty-two  miners  on  the 
Spokane,  and  reached  Olympia  January  19,  1856.  He  found  the  whole  country 
prostrated,  the  farms  abandoned,  the  settlers  gathered  in  the  few  small  villages 
and  starvation  staring  them  in  the  face  if  prevented  from  planting  crops.  He 
acted  promptly  and  energetically,  raising  one  thousand  volunteers  by  proclama- 
tion and  forcing  all  the  Indians  on  the  east  side  of  the  Sound  to  move  upon 
reservations.  He  sent  agents  to  Portland,  San  Francisco  and  Victoria  with  urgent 
appeals  for  arms,  ammunition  and  supplies  and  issued  territorial  certificates  of 
indebtedness  to  pay  the  volunteers.  His  aggressive  and  well  considered  action 
brought  the  war  to  a  successful  termination  in  1856  and  he  then  disbanded  the 
volunteers  and  disposed  of  the  remaining  equipment  and  supplies  at  public  auction. 
Although  the  danger  of  massacre  at  the  hands  of  the  red  men  was  over  there 
was  a  great  deal  of  unrest  in  the  territory  and  the  agents  of  the  Hudson's  Bay 
Company  took  a  stand  inimical  to  the  interests  of  the  territory  and  in  view  of 
these  unfavorable  conditions  Governor  Stevens  felt  it  best  to  proclaim  jnartial 
law  throughout  Pierce  and  Thurston  counties.  This  course  met  with  considerable 
criticism  but  time  proved  its  wisdom.  During  all  of  the  Indian  trouble  the  Stevens 
familv  remained  in  Olympia  and  the  four  children  regularly  attended  the  public 
school.  About  that  time  the  governor  erected  a  residence,  which  is  still  standing 
and  is  now  owned  by  his  son.  General  Hazard  Stevens,  a  sketch  of  whose  life 
appears  below. 

In  1857  Governor  Stevens  was  elected  as  delegate  to  congress  from  the  terri- 
tory and  in  the  fall  of  that  year  resigned  his  office  as  governor.  He  removed 
with  his  family  to  the  national  capital,  going  by  way  of  the  Isthmus  of  Panama, 
but  after  congress  had  adjourned  they  returned  to  Olympia,  where  they  lived 
until  he  was  sent  to  congress  for  a  second  term.  He  secured  the  payment  of  the 
Indian  war  debt,  the  confirmation  of  his  Indian  treaties  and  many  appropriations 
for  military  roads  between  Fort  Benton  and  Walla  Walla  and  between  Steila- 
coom  and  Vancouver.  Moreover,  forty-five  hundred  dollars  was  appropriated 
for  a  boundary  survey  between  Oregon  and  Washington  and  ninety-five  thousand 
dollars  for  the  Indian  service.  In  addition  to  these  achievements  Governor 
Stevens  was  instrumental  in  securing  a  new  land  office  and  district  for  the  south- 
ern part  of  the  territory  and  in  many  other  ways  he  furthered  the  interests  of 
Washington.  At  the  close  of  his  second  term  he  returned  to  Olympia  and  there 
organized  a  military  company  known  as  the  Pugent  Sound  Rifles,  of  which  he 


182  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

was  elected  captain.  He  more  than  any  other  man  deserved  the  credit  for  saving 
the  San  Juan  islands  to  the  United  States,  as  it  was  owing  to  the  firm  stand  which 
he  took  against  British  aggression  at  the  time  of  the  controversy  over  the 
possession  of  these  islands  that  this  valuable  group  became  the  property  of  this 
country.  He  was  a  candidate  for  election  as  delegate  to  congress  for  a  third 
term  when  the  news  reached  the  Pacific  coast  of  the  attack  by  the  southern  rebels 
upon  Fort  Sumter.  At  once  he  withdrew  from  the  race  and  oft'ered  his  services 
to  the  government.  He  was  made  colonel  of  the  Seventy-ninth  Highlanders, 
New  York  Volunteers.  At  length  he  became  major  general  of  volunteers  and, 
as  he  had  done  in  the  Mexican  war,  distinguished  himself  by  gallant  conduct. 
At  the  battle  of  Chantilly  he  grasped  the  colors  from  a  dying  standard  bearer 
and  was  leading  the  charge  upon  the  enemy's  position  when  the  fatal  shot  came. 
By  this  act  he  hurled  back  Jackson's  flanking  column,  and  saved  Pope's  army  and 
the  country  from  a  great  disaster. 

Mr.  Stevens  was  married  in  September,  1841,  to  Miss  Margaret  Hazard,  the 
daughter  of  an  eminent  lawyer  of  Newport,  Rhode  Island,  and  the  granddaughter 
of  Colonel  Daniel  Lyman,  who  served  with  honor  in  the  Revolutionary  war.  To 
this  union  were  born  the  following  children :  General  Hazard  Stevens ;  Virginia, 
who  died  at  two  years  of  age ;  Sue,  who  married  Colonel  Richard  I.  Eskridge ; 
Gertrude  Maude,  deceased ;  and  Kate,  who  married  Edward  W.  Bingham,  and 
after  his  decease,  James  H.  S.  Bates. 

It  was  such  men  as  General  Stevens,  men  of  determination,  daring  and 
resource,  that  made  possible  the  epic  story  of  the  conquest  of  a  continent  and 
the  building  up  of  a  mighty  nation  and  it  is  just  and  fitting  that  the  people  of 
today,  whose  heritage  is  due  to  the  labors  of  those  men,  should  hold  them  in 
veneration  and  should  endeavor  to  solve  the  problems  of  the  present  as  success- 
fully as  they  overcame  the  difficulties  of  pioneer  times. 


GENERAL  HAZARD  STEVENS. 

The  splendid  qualities  characteristic  of  his  father,  Isaac  Ingalls  Stevens,  have 
been  again  and  again  manifested  in  the  life  of  General  Hazard  Stevens,  soldier, 
man  of  affairs  and  industrial  leader.  He  has  kept  in  close  touch  with  the  growth 
of  Washington  during  all  the  years  intervening  between  territorial  days,  when 
as  a  boy  he  accompanied  his  father  on  long  and  dangerous  trips  into  the  country, 
until  the  present.  For  a  considerable  period  he  resided  in  the  east  but  is  now 
living  in  Olympia  in  order  to  the  better  look  after  his  interests  as  president  of  the 
Olympia  Light  &  Power  Company.  He  was  born  in  Newport,  Rhode  Island. 
June  9,  1842,  a  son  of  Major  General  Isaac  Ingalls  and  Margaret  (Hazard) 
Stevens.  He  was  an  active  and  fearless  boy  and  adapted  himself  readily  to  the 
conditions  of  pioneer  life  which  existed  in  the  territory  of  Washington  when 
the  Stevens  family  removed  here  in  1854,  the  father  having  been  appointed  the 
first  governor  of  the  territory. 

Hazard  Stevens  went  with  his  father  upon  many  of  his  expeditions  to  the 
various  Indian  tribes  of  the  northwest  and  on  one  trip  a  party  of  twenty-five  white 
men  traversed  the  wild,  unsettled  Indian  country  between  Puget  Sound  and  the 


(:4enp:ral  hazard  stevens 


-    THE   NEW   rORK 
PUBLIC  LIBRARY 

ASTOR,    LENOX 
^    TILDEN   FOUNDATION  j 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  185 

Missouri  river,  held  six  councils  with  the  Indians,  crossed  the  Rocky  mountains 
twice,  the  last  time  in  midwinter,  forced  their  way  through  hostile  tribes,  rescued 
a  party  of  miners  and  reached  Olympia  in  safety  after  an  absence  of  nine  months. 
During  that  time  they  had  traveled  three  thousand  miles  and  more  than  once  had 
been  in  great  danger  of  massacre.  At  one  time  while  on  this  trip  Hazard  Stevens, 
although  then  only  thirteen  years  old,  rode  one  hundred  and  fifty  miles  in  thirty 
hours  to  deliver  an  important  despatch  to  the  Gros  Ventres  Indians  and  was  a 
member  of  a  small  party,  accompanied  by  friendly  Blackfeet  Indians,  which 
hunted  bufitalo  for  three  weeks  and  procured  meat  for  the  main  party,  which  was 
almost  destitute  of  food.  In  the  Indian  war  of  1855-6  he  served  as  a  volunteer 
and  his  life  upon  the  frontier  developed  to  a  high  degree  his  native  powers  of 
self-reliance  and  quickness  of  decision. 

In  the  winter  of  1857  the  family  returned  to  the  east,  as  Governor  Stevens 
had  been  chosen  as  a  delegate  to  congress  from  Washington  territory,  and  the  son 
Hazard  entered  the  Chauncey  Hall   School  in   Boston,  where   he   prepared  for 
college.     In  i860  he  entered  Harvard  as  a  member  of  the  class  of  1864,  but  at 
the  end  of  his  freshman  year,  when  only  nineteen  years  old,  he  enlisted  in  the 
Union  army  for  service  in  the  Civil  war,  becoming  a  member  of  the  Seventy- 
ninth  Highlanders,  New  York  Volunteers,  of  which  his  father  was  colonel.    Froni 
the  first  engagement  in  which  he  took  part  until  the  close  of  the  war,  when  he  was 
brevetted  brigadier  general,  being  the  youngest  man  in  the  army  to  hold  the  rank 
of  general,  as  he  was  then  but  twenty-three  years  old,  he  was  almost  constantly 
on  the  front  line  of  battle  and  time  after  time  was  singled  out  by  his  superior 
officers  for  commendation  for  gallant  conduct.     Within  a  few  months  after  his 
enlistment  he   repeatedly  drilled  the   entire   brigade,  handling  several  thousand 
men,  of  the  three  arms,  with  great  success,  and  in  June,  1862,  he  won  high  praise 
not  only  from  his  commanding  officers  but  also  from  the  rebels  for  his  daring 
conduct  in  an  assault  upon  Fort  Lamar,  Confederate  fortifications,  near  Charles- 
ton, South  Carolina.     As  adjutant  general  of  the  First  Division,  which  was  com- 
manded  by  his   father,   he   went   through   Pope's   campaign   until   the   battle   of 
Chantilly,  in  which  his   father  was  killed  and  he  received  two  severe  wounds 
which  were  hastily  bandaged  on  the  field.     He  was  then  carried  to  a  neighboring 
farmhouse,  where  he  lay  until  two  o'clock  in  the  morning,  when  an  officer  of 
the  division  called  at  the  house,  as  the  Union   troops   were   falling  back,   and 
recognized   Captain   Stevens.     An  ambulance  was  called  and  he   was   taken   to 
Washington.     After  about  seven  weeks  he  had  recovered  from  his  wounds  suffi- 
ciently to  return  to  the  army  and  was  assigned  to  the  Third  Division  of  the 
Ninth  Corps  as  inspector  general.     He  took  part  in  the  battle  of  Fredericksburg 
and  in  March,  1863,  went  with  his  division  to  Sufl:"olk,  Virginia.    He  planned  and 
carried  out  the  storming  of  Fort  Huger,  which  eventually  led  to  the  Confederates 
abandoning  the  siege  of  Suffolk  and  for  which  he  was  awarded  the  Medal  of 
Honor  "for  mo.st   distinguished  gallantry."     Some   time   later   Captain   Stevens 
joined  the  Army  of  the  Potomac  and  was  made  inspector  general  and  adjutant 
general  of  the  Second  Division  of  the  Sixth  Corps,  which  command  had  been 
given  General  Getty.    At  the  battle  of  the  Wilderness  he  was  wounded  by  shrapnel 
but  after  his  wound  was  dressed  and  bandaged  returned  to  the  field.    He  remained 
on  duty  with  this  division  until  the  end  of  the  war  and  took  part  in  every  battle 
in  which  the  Sixth  Corps  participated.     He  was  successively  promoted  major  and 

Vol.  11—10 


186  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

assistant  adjutant  general,  brevet  colonel  and  brigadier  general.  After  being 
mustered  out  from  the  army  at  the  close  of  the  war  influential  friends  offered 
to  secure  his  appointment  as  major  in  the  regular  army,  but  he  declined  to 
consider  the  offer. 

General  Stevens  came  to  Washington  territory  on  again  taking  up  the  duties 
of  civil  life  and  was  employed  by  the  Oregon  Steam  Navigation  Company  as  their 
agent  at  Wallula,  a  steamboat  landing  on  the  Columbia  river,  three  hundred  and 
fifty  miles  above  its  mouth.  He  remained  there  for  a  year  and  a  half  and  took 
in  for  the  company  one  hundred  and  fifty  thousand  dollars,  nearly  all  in  gold 
dust.  So  faithfully  and  efficiently  did  he  discharge  his  duties  that  upon  severing 
his  connection  with  that  company  he  received  warm  commendation  from  its 
president.  While  at  Wallula  he  received  the  appointment  of  captain  in  the 
Fourteenth  Infantry,  U.  S.  A.,  which  however,  he  declined.  He  was  joined  by 
his  mother  and  sisters,  who  were  dependent  upon  him  for  support,  and  he  erected 
a  home  for  them  at  Portland,  Oregon.  In  May,  1868,  he  was  appointed  collector 
of  internal  revenue  for  Washington  territory  and  removed  to  Olympia,  where  his 
mother  and  sisters  also  took  up  their  residence  during  the  following  year.  During 
the  three  years  that  he  filled  that  office  he  collected  two  hundred  thousand  dollars 
and  returned  less  than  one  per  cent  of  the  taxes  as  uncollectible.  While  collector 
he  used  his  spare  time  in  reading  law  with  the  Hon.  Elwood  Evans  and  at  length 
was  admitted  to  the  bar.  From  1870  to  1874  he  was  attorney  for  the  Northern 
Pacific  Railroad  Company  and  in  that  capacity  purchased  the  right  of  way  for 
the  railroad  from  Kalama  on  the  Columbia  to  Tacoma,  secured  and  platted  town 
sites  along  the  road  and  aided  in  securing  the  site  for  the  terminus  at  Tacoma. 
However,  the  most  important  service  which  he  rendered  the  company  was  the 
suppression  of  timber  stealing  on  the  public  land  along  the  right  of  way.  By  the 
provisions  of  its  charter  the  company  was  to  acquire  title  to  half  the  land  within 
forty  miles  of  its  road  as  soon  as  the  road  was  built  and  accepted  and  it  was 
therefore  vitally  interested  in  the  preservation  of  the  timber  on  such  land.  In 
the  name  and  with  the  authority  of  the  United  States  land  office  General  Stevens 
seized  every  raft  of  logs  cut  on  public  land  and  towed  them  to  the  nearest  town, 
where  they  were  sold  at  auction  imless  the  logger  would  agree  to  quit  trespassing 
on  public  land,  in  which  case  he  was  permitted  to  redeem  the  logs  at  half  the 
market  price.  This  course  was  pursued  by  General  Stevens  with  such  vigor  that 
within  a  year  illegal  logging  was  practically  unknown.  The  railroad  company  paid 
the  entire  expense  of  this  action,  amounting  to  ten  thousand  dollars,  but  realized 
from  the  sale  of  the  seized  timber  slightly  more  than  that  sum.  Although  the 
company  had  agreed  to  run  its  line  to  Olympia  it  built  the  road  fifteen  miles 
to  the  eastward,  leaving  Olympia  without  means  of  communication  save  the  old 
stage-coach.  Many  families  removed  to  Tacoma,  the  terminus  of  the  Northern 
Pacific,  and  for  a  time  it  seemed  as  if  Olympia  were  destined  to  cease  to  exist. 
General  Stevens,  however,  interested  its  citizens  in  the  Olympia  Railroad  Union, 
of  which  he  was  chosen  president,  and  eventually  with  the  aid  of  a  seventy-five 
thousand  dollar  issue  of  county  bonds  a  road  was  built  connecting  Olympia  with 
the  Northern  Pacific.  As  at  the  time  the  population  of  Olympia  was  barely  two 
thousand  the  difficulties  in  the  way  of  the  successful  accomplishment  of  this 
purpose  may  be  readily  realized. 

In  1874  President  Grant  appointed  General  Stevens  commissioner  to  investi- 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  187 

gate  the  claims  of  British  subjects  on  the  San  Juan  archipelago,  as  the  British 
government  had  made  representations  to  the  United  States  concerning  claims. 
After  giving  public  notice  General  Stevens  visited  every  settlement  on  the  islands, 
prepared  to  receive  and  note  all  claims,  but  found  that,  contrary  to  the  representa- 
tions of  the  British  government,  there  were  no  claims,  as  all  of  the  British 
subjects  residing  upon  the  islands  had  become  naturalized  American  citizens  and 
had  taken  their  land  under  the  United  States  land  laws. 

For  many  years  it  was  believed  that  Mount  Rainier,  sixty  miles  distant  from 
Olympia,  was  insurmountable,  but  in  August,  1870,  General  Stevens  and  a  small 
party  attempted  the  ascent  and  on  the  17th  of  that  month  he  and  a  single  com- 
panion, P.  B.  Van  Trump,  reached  the  summit.  As  it  was  too  late  to  descend 
that  night  they  took  refuge  in  the  crater  and  were  saved  from  freezing  by  the 
steam  emitted  therefrom.  General  Stevens  published  a  full  account  of  this  trip 
in  the  Atlantic  Monthly  of  November,  1876. 

In  1874  his  mother  and  sisters  returned  to  Boston  and  the  following  year  he 
joined  them  in  that  city,  where  he  at  once  entered  upon  the  practice  of  law.  In 
1885  he  was  elected  to  the  general  court  from  the  Dorchester  ward  as  an  inde- 
pendent and  organized  the  Municipal  Reform  Association,  which  was  influential 
in  securing  reform  in  the  city  charter.  Although  he  had  been  elected  as  an 
independent  and  was  without  party  support  he  gained  the  respect  and  confidence 
of  the  house  in  a  sljort  time  and  was  placed  on  the  committee  on  cities.  He 
reported  the  city  charter  bill  for  the  committee  and  it  was  passed  by  the  house 
and  also  by  the  senate,  thus  becoming  a  law.  He  also  drew  up  the  bill  for  limiting 
the  rate  of  taxation  and  indebtedness,  which  is  still  the  law  of  the  state  of 
Massachusetts.  He  was  reelected  to  the  house  and  during  his  second  term  also 
rendered  efficient  and  public-spirited  service.  He  has  made  a  careful  study  of  the 
tariff  and  its  effect  upon  the  national  life  for  many  years  and  has  long  been 
prominent  in  tariff"  reform  work.  In  1886  he  was  nominated  for  congress  by  a 
body  of  tariff  reformers  and  received  certain  assurance  of  the  democratic  nomina- 
tion, which,  however,  was  given  to  Hon.  Leopold  Morse,  and  General  Stevens 
withdrew  his  candidacy.  He  warmly  supported  Grover  Cleveland  in  his  cam- 
paign for  the  presidency  and  made  many  speeches  in  his  behalf  in  Massachusetts, 
Rhode  Island  and  Connecticut.  In  1908  he  was  a  candidate  for  congress  from 
the  tenth  congressional  district  of  Massachusetts.  At  the  time  of  the  Spanish 
war  he  was  strongly  recommended  for  appointment  as  brigadier  general,  but  as 
two  citizens  of  Massachusetts  had  already  been  appointed  to  that  rank  President 
McKinley  declined  to  appoint  a  third. 

In  1880  General  Stevens  erected  a  home  on  Mount  Bowdoin,  in  the  Dorchester 
district  of  Boston  and  resided  there  until  1914,  during  which  time  he  did  much 
to  promote  the  interests  of  that  community  and  continued  in  the  successful  prac- 
tice of  law.  In  IQ14  he  took  up  his  residence  in  Olympia,  where  he  has  since 
made  his  home.  He  is  now  improving  and  carrying  on  the  Cloverfields  Farm  and 
Dairy  and  supplying  the  people  of  Olympia  with  pure  Holstein  milk.  He  is 
president  of  the  Olympia  Tight  &  Power  Company,  one  of  the  leading  public 
utility  corporations  on  the  Pacific  coast,  and  is  recognized  as  a  prominent  figure 
in  the  business  world  of  this  section. 

General  Stevens  holds  membership  in  the  Society  of  the  Cincinnati,  to  which 
only  those  are  eligible  who  are  descendants  of  the  Revolutionary  officers  who 


188  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

founded  the  organization.  He  also  belongs  to  the  Loyal  Legion,  the  Grand  Army 
of  the  Republic,  the  Sons  of  the  American  Revolution,  the  Massachusetts  Mil- 
Historical  Society  and  the  State  Historical  Societies  of  Washington,  Oregon  and 
Montana,  in  which  he  was  elected  to  honorary  membership.  In  1901  he  published 
a  life  of  his  father,  Isaac  Ingalls  Stevens,  which  is  recognized  as  an  authority  not 
only  upon  the  life  of  its  subject  but  also  upon  the  earlier  history  of  the  Pacific 
northwest.  In  recognition  of  this  work  and  of  his  varied  public  service  Harvard 
College  conferred  upon  him  the  degree  of  Master  of  Arts.  In  addition  to  this 
biography  he  has  read  many  papers  before  the  Mil-Historical  Society  of  Massa- 
chusetts and  the  Loyal  Legion,  which  were  published  by  the  society,  among  them 
being :  "The  Battle  of  Cedar  Creek" ;  "The  Storming  of  the  Lines  of  Peters- 
burg'" ;  "The  Sixth  Corps  in  the  Wilderness" ;  "The  Battle  of  Sailor's  Creek" 
and  "The  Siege  of  Suffolk."  In  1907  and  1908  he  was  the  prime  mover  in  a 
successful  campaign  to  save  the  old  state  house  from  the  encroachments  of  the 
Boston  Transit  Commission  and  drafted  and  secured  the  passage  of  the  act  placing 
that  historic  structure  under  the  joint  care  of  the  governor  of  Massachusetts  and 
the  mayor  of  Boston  and  prohibiting  any  commercial  use  thereof.  There  is  no 
need  of  comment  as  to  his  life,  for  the  very  record  of  his  accomplishment  renders 
words  of  praise  superfluous. 


JULIUS  A.  STRATTON. 

Julius  A.  Stratton,  member  of  the  Seattle  bar,  has  for  more  than  six  decades 
been  identified  with  the  builders  of  the  empire  of  the  northw^est,  having  become 
a  resident  of  Oregon  in  1854.  He  was  then  a  lad  of  ten  years,  having  been  born 
in  Indiana  near  Madison,  on  the  21st  of  October,  1844.  His  parents  were  Curtis 
P.  and  Lavinia  (Fitch)  Stratton,  who  in  the  year  1854  left  Indiana  and  made 
their  way  to  Oregon,  settling  in  the  Umpqua  valley,  where  Julius  A.  Stratton  lived 
until  July,  1861,  when  he  removed  to  Salem,  Oregon,  and  entered  the  office  of  the 
Oregon  Statesman.  There  he  learned  the  printer's  trade  and  worked  steadily  at 
the  trade  from  1861  until  1865,  and  thereafter  at  need  until  his  graduation  from 
Willamette  University  in  1879.  He  completed  a  classical  course  in  that  institu- 
tion and  won  the  Bachelor  of  Arts  degree.  He  studied  law  at  Salem,  Oregon,  and 
was  admitted  to  practice  at  the  Oregon  bar  in  1871.  The  following  year  he  took 
up  his  abode  in  Eugene,  where  he  opened  an  office,  but  in  1874  removed  to  Port- 
land and  in  1875  returned  to  Salem.  He  afterward  engaged  in  the  practice  of 
his  profession  in  Salem  until  1881  and  in  the  meantime  was  called  to  public  office, 
serving  for  two  years  as  clerk  of  the  supreme  court.  In  1882  he  was  made 
superintendent  of  the  Oregon  state  penitentiary  and  occupied  that  position  for 
two  years  under  Governor  Moody.  He  was  clerk  of  the  supreme  court  and 
ex-officio  reporter  from  1884  until  1887.  In  February,  1888,  he  removed  from 
Salem,  Oregon,  to  Seattle,  \vhere  he  has  since  made  his  home,  and  in  1889  he 
was  appointed  prosecuting  attorney  of  King  county  to  fill  a  vacancy  caused  by  the 
death  of  W.  W.  Newlin.  In  January,  1890,  he  was  appointed  judge  of  the 
superior  court  of  King  county  by  Governor  Ferry  and  at  the  next  regular  election 
declined  to  become  a  candidate  for  the  office,  preferring  to  concentrate  his  energies 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  189 

upon  the  private  practice  of  his  profession,  in  which  he  has  won  substantial  and 
creditable  success. 

In  August,  1889,  in  Portland,  Oregon,  Mr.  Stratton  was  united  in  marriage 
to  Miss  Martha  L.  Powell,  who  died  in  April,  1895.  In  August,  1900,  at  Victoria, 
British  Columbia,  he  wedded  Laura  M.  Adams,  and  they  have  a  son,  Julius.  In 
politics  Mr.  Stratton  is  a  republican  but  has  never  been  an  active  party  worker. 
He  takes  an  interest  in  the  welfare  and  upbuilding  of  Seattle,  and  he  served  as  a 
member  of  the  library  board  from  1898  until  1907,  and  for  five  years  of  that 
period  was  chairman  of  the  board.  In  April,  1914,  he  was  again  appointed  a 
member  of  the  board,  whereon  he  is  now  serving.  He  is  a  man  of  broad  and 
scholarly  attainments  and  association  with  him  means  expansion  and  elevation. 


WILLIAM  SYLVIO  DURAND,  M.  D. 

Dr.  William  Sylvio  Durand,  engaged  in  the  practice  of  medicine  and  surgery 
in  Everett,  has  by  reason  of  broad  study  and  wide  experience  gained  distinction 
as  one  of  the  eminent  physicians  of  western  Washington.  He  occupies  one  of 
the  finest  homes  in  the  city  at  No.  2329  Rucker  street  and  his  residence  is  the 
visible  evidence  of  a  well  spent  life,  for  he  started  out  upon  his  business  career 
empty  handed.  His  realty  holdings  in  Everett  are  extensive  and  he  has  unbounded 
faith  in  the  future  growth  and  prosperity  of  the  city. 

Dr.  Durand  was  born  in  Champion,  Michigan,  December  27,  1870,  his  par- 
ents being  Alexander  and  Julia  (Beaudoin)  Durand.  The  father,  a  native  of 
Canada,  was  born  September  29,  1829,  and  was  of  French  descent.  In  1869  he 
removed  to  Michigan,  becoming  a  pioneer  settler  of  Marquette  county,  estab- 
lishing his  home  in  the  primeval  forest.  He  became  a  heavy  timber  contractor, 
hewing  the  logs  for  mine  timbers,  the  work  being  done  by  hand.  He  passed 
away  in  July,  1893,  at  the  age  of  sixty-four  years,  his  remains  being  interred  at 
Champion,  Michigan.  His  wife,  who  was  born  November  16,  1829,  and  was 
also  of  French  lineage,  passed  away  May  26,  1896,  and  was  buried  at  Cham- 
pion. They  reared  a  family  of  seven  children,  of  whom  four  are  yet  living: 
Ernest,  a  stationary  engineer  of  Republic,  Michigan ;  Telesphore,  who  is  a  hotel 
man  of  Baraga,  Michigan ;  and  Lida,  the  wife  of  Philip  Foucault,  also  of  Baraga, 
Michigan. 

The  youngest  of  the  family  is  Dr.  Durand,  who  was  educated  in  the  public 
and  high  schools  of  Champion  and  in  the  Michigan  State  Normal  College  at 
Ypsilanti,  where  he  attended  two  years,  1890-91-92.  He  then  became  a  school 
siiperintendent,  passing  the  state  examination  for  first-grade  certificate,  and  for 
three  years  he  was  school  superintendent  at  National  Mine,  Marquette  county, 
Michigan.  At  a  later  date  he  entered  the  University  of  Michigan,  which  he 
attended  for  four  years,  and  during  that  period  he  was  for  two  years  instructor 
in  anatomy,  teaching  under  Professor  J.  Play  fair  McMurrich,  A.  M.,  Ph.  D., 
now  professor  of  anatomy  in  the  University  of  Toronto.  Dr.  Durand  was  grad- 
uated in  1899  with  the  M.  D.  degree  and  located  for  practice  at  Nashville,  Michi- 
gan, where  he  remained  for  a  year. 


190  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

Attracted  by  the  opportunities  of  the  growing  northwest,  Dr.  Durand  arrived 
in  Everett,  Washington,  in  August,  1900.  He  passed  the  state  board  examina- 
tion in  January,  1901,  and  has  since  been  continuously  and  successfully  engaged 
in  practice,  devoting  his  attention  largely  to  general  surgical  work.  He  belongs 
to  the  Snohomish  County  Medical  Society,  the  W'ashington  State  Medical  Asso- 
ciation and  the  American  Medical  Association. 

On  Tuesday,  April  16,  1901,  in  \'ancouver,  British  Columbia,  Dr.  Durand 
was  joined  in  wedlock  to  Miss  Margaret  Reynolds,  a  native  of  Lindsay,  Ontario, 
Canada,  and  a  daughter  of  Joseph  and  Nellie  (Cousins)  Reynolds,  who  are  resi- 
dents of  Vancouver,  British  Columbia.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Durand  have  three  chil- 
dren, as  follows :  William  Raynor,  who  was  born  in  Everett,  Washington,  on 
the  7th  of  July,  1902;  Charles  Reynolds  H.,  whose  birth  occurred  in  Everett, 
October  7,  1903;  and  Margaret  Helen,  born  in  Everett,  June  15,  1908. 

The  religious  faith  of  the  family  is  that  of  the  Roman  Catholic  church  and 
Dr.  Durand  is  also  connected  with  the  Knights  of  Columbus.  He  has  been  called 
upon  for  many  important  public  services,  professionally  and  otherwise,  and  has 
discharged  his  duties  with  marked  capability  and  fidelity.  Under  appointment  of 
Mayor  Roland  H.  Hartley  he  became  a  member  of  the  Everett  civil  service  com- 
mission and  also  served  for  many  years  as  United  States  pension  examiner.  He 
has  likewise  been  a  member  of  the  state  board  of  health  through  appointment  of 
Governor  McBride.  He  has  long  been  active  in  politics  and  has  supported  the 
republican  party  since  casting  his  first  presidential  ballot.  From  the  age  of  thir- 
teen he  has  made  his  own  way  in  the  world  and  his  therefore  is  the  notable 
record  of  a  self-made  man  who  by  the  sheer  force  of  his  determination  and 
ability  has  gained  prominence  and  success. 


WALTER  B.  CRAMMATTE. 

Walter  B.  Crammatte  is  president  and  manager  of  the  x^berdeen  Manufactur- 
ing Company,  in  which  connection  he  is  operating  a  plant  utilized  in  woodworking. 
He  has  been  a  resident  of  Aberdeen  for  twenty-six  years,  arriving  in  that  city 
from  New  York  when  a  youth  of  sixteen,  his  birth  having  occurred  in  the  eastern 
metropolis  in  1874.  His  father,  Louis  J.  Crammatte,  died  in  New  York  city  in 
1886.  The  mother,  who  bore  the  maiden  name  of  Mary  Benn,  was  born  in  Massa- 
chusetts and  was  a  niece  of  Samuel  Benn,  the  honored  founder  of  Aberdeen.  It 
was  the  fact  that  her  uncle  lived  here  that  brought  Mrs.  Crammatte  with  her 
three  children,  Walter  B.,  William  and  Elizabeth,  to  the  coast.  The  daughter 
is  now  the  wife  of  L.  P.  Dudley,  of  Aberdeen.  Upon  coming  to  Washington 
Mrs.  Crammatte  established  a  retail  dry  goods  and  millinery  business,  which  she 
conducted  for  a  considerable  period  or  until  1904.  She  then  retired  and  passed 
away  March  27,  19 16. 

Walter  B.  Crammatte  became  the  active  assistant  of  his  mother  in  the  store 
and  was  so  engaged  for  a  numl^er  of  years,  contributing  much  to  the  success  of 
the  business.  Fie  then  turned  his  attention  to  real  estate  dealing,  which  he  fol- 
lowed until  he  purchased  the  business  of  the  Aberdeen  Manufacturing  Company 
in  1906.    This  company  was  organized  December  22,  1899,  with  John  A.  Damitio 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  191 

* 

president;  A.  A.  Damitio,  treasurer;  and  John  Heintz,  secretary.  They  opened 
a  woodworking  factory  and  the  business  has  been  steadily  continued  from  the 
beginning.  With  Mr.  Crammatte's  purchase  of  the  business  he  became  presi- 
dent and  manager  of  the  company,  the  other  officers  being  WiUiam  Crammatte, 
vice  president,  and  F.  M.  WyHe,  secretary.  They  have  added  new  machinery 
and  equipment  and  they  manufacture  anything  in  woodworking  Hues,  inchxding 
toys  and  detail  work.  Their  product  finds  a  ready  sale  on  the  market  and  they 
employ  twenty-five  people.  Walter  B.  Crammatte  is  also  a  stockholder  of  the 
Grays  Harbor  Theatre  Company,  which  he  aided  in  organizing  and  which  built 
the  Grand  theatre,  with  a  seating  capacity  of  twelve  hundred.  This  too  is  proving 
a  profitable   undertaking. 

In  1903  Mr.  Crammatte  was  married  in  Portland,  Oregon,  to  Miss  Alle  G. 
Quackenbush,  of  Iowa,  and  they  have  two  sons,  William  Walter  and  Alan  Benn. 
Mr.  Crammatte  is  a  republican  in  his  political  allegiance  and  in  1907  was  ap- 
pointed postmaster  of  Aberdeen,  in  which  position  he  continuously  served  until 
191 5,  making  a  creditable  record  by  the  prompt  and  faithful  manner  in  which 
he  discharged  the  duties  of  the  position.  Fraternally  he  is  connected  with  the 
Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  He  is  a  very  active  young  business  man, 
thoroughly  interested  in  and  devoted  to  the  welfare  of  his  city  and  state,  and  he 
possesses  in  liberal  measure  that  spirit  of  enterprise  which  has  brought  about 
the  present  measure  of  progress  and  prosperity  which  Aberdeen  enjoys. 


GEORGE  E.  STARRETT. 

George  E.  Starrett,  now  living  retired  in  Port  Townsend,  has  through  the 
extent  and  variety  of  his  business  interests  been  closely  identified  with  the  de- 
velopment and  upbuilding  of  the  city,  and  through  individual  effort  and  ability 
he  has  worked  his  way  upward  to  a  place  among  the  leading  citizens  of  western 
Washington.  The  width  of  the  continent  separates  him  from  his  birthplace, 
for  he  is  a  native  of  Thomaston,  Maine,  where  he  was  born  on  the  31st  of 
October,  1854,  his  parents  being  Edwin  and  Cordelia  (Merrick)  Starrett,  who 
were  also  natives  of  the  Pine  Tree  state.  In  1865  they  removed  to  Illinois,  set- 
tling at  Liberty ville,  Lake  county.  The  year  1884  witnessed  their  arrival  in  Port 
Townsend,  Washington.  In  early  life  the  father  was  a  ship  carpenter  and  in 
Illinois  he  engaged  in  house  building.  Following  his  removal  to  Port  Townsend 
he  lived  retired  until  his  death,  which  occurred  in  1890,  when  he  had  reached  the 
age  of  seventy  years.  His  wife  passed  away  in  Port  Townsend  in  1907,  at 
the  age  of  eighty-one  years.  They  had  a  family  of  six  children,  four  sons  and 
two  daughters,  one  son  and  the  two  daughters  being  now  deceased.  The  others 
are:  Danville  William,  living  in  Oakland,  California;  A.  M.,  of  Seattle;  and 
George  E.,  of  Port  Townsend. 

The  last  named  was  the  second  in  order  of  birth  in  the  family  and  in  his 
boyhood  days  he  attended  school  in  Maine  and  in  Illinois.  He  learned  the  car- 
penter's trade,  also  sawmill  work  and  engaged  in  business  as  a  carpenter  and 
contractor  in  Port  Townsend,  having  removed  to  this  city  in  1880.  In  1888  he 
turned  his  attention  to  the  undertaking  business  and  also  contracted  and  built 


192  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

• 

most  of  the  houses  in  Port  Townsend  in  the  early  days.  He  likewise  purchased 
a  sawmill  which  he  operated  from  1894  until  1909,  when  he  closed  down  the 
plant  and  soon  afterward  sold  out.  Since  that  year  he  has  lived  retired  from  ac- 
tive business  save  for  the  management  of  his  invested  interests.  His  activity  has 
even  been  of  a  character  that  has  contributed  to  public  progress  and  to  the  busi- 
ness development  of  the  district  in  which  he  lives. 

On  the  27th  of  February,  1887,  in  Seattle,  Mr.  Starrett  was  married  to  Miss 
Ann  D.  Van  Bokkelen,  a  daughter  of  J.  J.  H.  Van  Bokkelen,  a  pioneer  settler 
of  Port  Townsend  and  a  noted  Indian  fighter  who  came  to  Washington  by  the 
overland  route  in  1849  ^"*^  ^^^  one  of  the  first  settlers  of  Port  Townsend.  He 
afterward  became  prominent  as  judge  of  the  probate  court  of  Jefferson  county 
and  he  also  filled  the  office  of  justice  of  the  peace.  His  death  occurred  in  Port 
Townsend  in  1889,  when  he  had  reached  the  age  of  seventy-two  years,  and  his 
wife  passed  away  in  1885,  at  the  age  of  sixty-four  years.  In  1914  Mr.  Starrett 
was  called  upon  to  mourn  the  loss  of  his  wife,  who  died  on  the  loth  of  April, 
when  fifty  years  of  age,  and  was  buried  in  the  Port  Townsend  cemetery.  She 
left  a  son,  Morris  E.,  and  another  child  had  died  in  infancy.  Morris  E.  Starrett 
was  born  in  Port  Townsend  in  March,  1894,  and  is  now  a  student  in  the  Uni- 
versity of  Notre  Dame  at  Notre  Dame,  Indiana. 

In  religious  faith  Mr.  Starrett  is  a  Roman  Catholic  and  fraternally  he  is 
connected  with  the  Woodmen  of  the  World.  He  is  a  democrat  in  politics  and 
for  six  terms  he  has  filled  the  office  of  city  councilman  and  also  has  been  county 
commissioner  and  school  director.  He  is  ever  loyal  to  public  interests  and  active 
in  support  of  those  forces  which  he  deems  of  greatest  value  to  the  community. 
His  public  spirit  was  shown  in  his  offer  of  free  factory  sites,  whereby  he  offered 
about  eight  acres  of  tide  land"  with  eight  hundred  feet  frontage  on  the  bay  to  be 
used  for  factory  sites.  This  land  is  situated  near  the  old  Fort  Townsend  mili- 
tary reservation,  about  a  mile  from  the  Mihvaukee  terminal,  and  is  on  one  of  the 
most  sheltered  spots  on  the  northern  side  of  the  bay.  Through  this  ofifer  Mr. 
Starrett  has  done  much  to  upbuild  the  city  and  extend  its  business  connections. 
He  cooperates  heartily  in  every  movement  for  the  general  good  and  gives  his 
aid  and  support  where  they  are  most  needed  to  further  the  public  welfare. 


ARCHIBALD  STEWART  PATRICK. 

One  of  the  great  sources  of  national  prosperity  is  the  coal  fields.  The  land 
which  must  obtain  its  coal  supplies  from  other  countries  necessarily  must  add  to 
its  manufactures  the  cost  of  the  fuel,  which  constitutes  the  basic  element  of  all 
motive  power.  That  land  is  particularly  fortunate  therefore  which  has  within  the 
depths  of  the  earth  this  source  of  wealth,  and  Washington  has  been  particularly 
blessed  in  this  regard — more  so  than  other  sections  of  the  northwest.  To  Archi- 
bald Stewart  Patrick  is  given  the  credit  for  the  location  of  the  great  Roslyn  coal 
fields,  the  product  of  which  is  acknowledged  to  be  the  best  coal  for  domestic  and 
steam  purposes  in  the  entire  country.  From  the  time  of  the  discovery  of  the 
Roslyn  fields  Mr.  Patrick  was  more  or  less  closely  cormected  with  the  development 
of  the  mines  in  that  district  and  today,  having  acquired  a  substantial  competence 


AECHIBALD  S.  PATKICK 


THE   NEW   Yonw 
PM"C  LIBHARY 

_____^;^^OUN  D  ATXON 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  195 

as  the  reward  of  his  labors  and  business  enterprise  and  abihty,  he  is  now  Hving 
retired  in  Tacoma,  having  a  beautiful  home  at  No.  924  North  K  street.  He  was 
born  October  28,  1862,  near  Glasgow,  Scotland,  a  son  of  James  and  Jean  (Stewart) 
Patrick,  who  were  also  natives  of  that  country.  The  father  was  a  mine  manager 
with  the  Murray  &  Cunningham  Company  for  twenty  years  and  in  1869  came 
with  his  family  to  America,  settling  near  Pittsburgh,  Pennsylvania,  where  he 
resumed  active  connection  with  mining  operations.  Later  he  established  his  home 
at  Churchill,  Trumbull  county,  Ohio,  where  he  retired  from  active  business.  He 
passed  away  in  Reynoldsville,  Pennsylvania,  February  22,  1891.  In  his  family 
were  ten  children,  of  whom  seven  are  yet  living. 

Archibald  S.  Patrick  was  the  eighth  in  order  of  birth  in  that  family.  He 
obtained  his  early  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Churchill,  Ohio,  and  at  the 
advice  of  his  father  took  up  mining  as  a  life  work.  He  was  first  connected  with  the 
nrm  of  Shepard  &  Company,  coal  mine  operators  at  Boone,  Iowa,  and  in  1883 
he  went  to  Montana,  where  he  became  connected  with  the  Northern  Pacific  Coal 
Company  as  mine  contractor  and  foreman,  occupying  that  position  for  three  years. 
He  was  selected  by  the  Northern  Pacific  Coal  Company  as  one  of  six  men  to  in- 
vestigate the  future  possibilities  for  coal  supplies  in  the  northwest  and  the  first 
location  of  the  party  was  the  now  well  known  Roslyn  coal  fields.  Up  to  that  time 
there  had  been  but  one  discovery,  known  as  the  Dirty  vein.  The  party  ran  several 
diamond  drills  through  that  section,  this  being  the  first  diamond  drilling  for  coal 
in  the  northwest.  Mr.  Patrick  is  accredited  with  the  actual  discovery  of  the  rich 
Roslyn  coal  fields.  The  coal  pitches  on  an  average  of  about  sixteen  degrees  and 
this  field  is  the  most  regular -v^in  in  the  northwest,  while  the  quality  is  regarded 
as  the  best  for  domestic  and  steafti  coal  in  the  United  States.  Moreover,  the  Roslyn 
field  produces  more  coal  anntially  than  all  of  the  rest  of  the  state  of  Washington. 
Later  Mr.  Patrick  was  equipped  with  a  diamond  drill  and  sent  by  a  party  of  the 
officials  of  the  Northern  Pacific  and  Union  Pacific  Railroad  Companies  on  a  private 
undertaking.  He  was  to  go  to  Vancouver  island  and  make  his  way  to  an  Indian 
reservation  seventy  miles  southwest  of  Victoria,  where  he  spent  one  season  in 
search  for  coal  without  success.  He  then  returned  to  Koslyn  and  began  pros- 
pecting for  coal  and  investigating  coal  formations  on  his  own  account,  covering 
a  wide  territory  that  included  a  part  of  Oregon  and  the  northwest.  He  visited 
the  coal  formations  through  the  state  of  Washington  and  went  to  the  Crows  Nest 
in  British  Columbia.  After  a  thorough  investigation  of  these  fields  his  opinion  was 
'that  the  valuable  coal  fields  were  limited  to  the  state  of  Washington  and  that  there 
were  no  prospective  values  whatever  in  Oregon. 

After  this  investigation  he  was  satisfied  to  apply  all  of  his  energy  and  efifort 
to  secure  some  portion  of  the  Roslyn  coal  field.  He  returned  to  the  town  of 
Roslyn  and  installed  the  waterworks  there  and  did  general  contracting.  He 
first  ventured  in  the  coal  trade  independently  by  organizing  the  Roslyn  Coal  Com- 
pany in  1898  in  partnership  with  William  MacKay  and  A.  D.  Hopper,  of  Spokane. 
At  that  time  the  Spokane  Gas  Company  was  controlled  by  the  Hopper  estate  of 
Philadelphia  and  the  Roslyn  Coal  Company  supplied  the  Gas  Company  of  Spokane 
with  gas  coal  and  also  with  domestic  coal  for  the  trade  in  the  territory.  The 
Roslyn  Company  continued  its  existence  up  to  the  time  the  Hopper  estate  disposed 
of  the  gas  interests.  Mr.  Patrick  then  purchased  Mr.  Hopper's  share  in  the  busi- 
ness and  he  and  Mr.  MacKay  became  sole  owners  of  the  Roslyn  Coal  Company. 


196  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

He  was  afterward  engaged  in  making  a  survey  of  the  most  valuable  coal  lands  in 
the  Roslyn  fields.  This  property  had  been  regarded  by  expert  geologists  and 
mining  experts  as  practically  worthless,  but  Mr.  Patrick's  knowledge  of  mining 
fields  was  such  that  he  was  led  to  the  belief  that  it  was  the  best  coal  producing 
district  of  the  northwest,  and  this  belief  has  for  seven  years  found  practical  demon- 
stration in  the  quality  and  quantity  of  the  coal  produced  in  the  field.  In  1905,  Air. 
Patrick  with  C.  X.  Larabee,  William  MacKay  and  Cyrus  Gates  organized  the 
Roslyn  Cascade  Coal  Company,  which  is  operating  two  mines  in  this  district  that 
will  continue  to  produce  coal  in  abundance  for  many  years.  There  is  perhaps  no 
one  better  informed  concerning  the  coal  fields  of  the  northwest  and  his  efforts  have 
been  a  most  important  element  in  their  development. 

On  the  ist  of  January,  1891,  Mr.  Patrick  was  married  at  Youngstown,  Ohio,  to 
Miss  Euphemia  Simpson,  a  daughter  of  Henry  and  Jennie  (Burrows)  Simpson, 
both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Scotland  and  on  coming  to  America  settled  in  Ohio. 
Six  children  have  been  born  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Patrick :  Jean,  Mary  and  Nellie,  who 
have  completed  school ;  James  Stewart,  who  was  a  student  in  DeKoven  Hall  and  is 
now  attending  the  Lowell  school  in  Tacoma ;  Harry  Simpson,  also  attending 
school ;  and  Euphemia,  who  completes  the  family. 

After  spending  twenty-five  years  in  the  mining  business,  most  of  the  time  in 
Roslyn,  Mr.  Patrick  came  to  Tacoma,  desiring  to  give  his  children  the  benefit  of  the 
educational  opportunities  there  to  be  secured  and  recognizing  the  desirability  of 
the  city  in  other  ways  as  a  place  of  residence.  He  himself  had  little  opportunity  to 
attend  school,  but  throughout  his  life  by  his  wide  experience  he  has  added  to  his 
knowledge  and  is  today  a  well  informed  and  practical  business  man  who  deserves 
much  credit  for  what  he  has  accomplished.  He  belongs  to  the  Masonic  fraternity, 
in  which  he  has  attained  the  thirty-second  degree  of  the  Scottish  Rite,  and  for 
several  years  he  served  as  master  in  the  lodge.  In  politics  he  has  always  been  an 
active  republican  and  he  and  his  family  are  loyal  adherents  of  the  Presbyterian 
church.  His  entire  life  has  been  characterized  by  high  and  honorable  principles 
and  worthy  purposes  and  his  indefatigable  energy,  keen  sagacity  and  sound  judg- 
ment have  brought  him  success,  while  the  integrity  of  his  business  methods  and 
the  high  ideals  to  which  he  has  adhered  have  gained  him  a  most  creditable  and 
enviable  standing  in  the  regard  of  his  fellowmen.  His  is  a  happy  temperament  and 
genial  disposition  and  he  has  a  circle  of  friends  who  have  ever  held  him  in  the 
warmest  esteem. 


JAMES  B.  WILSON. 


James  B.  Wilson,  connected  with  mercantile  interests  at  Ferndale  as  man- 
ager of  a  store,  has  been  identified  with  the  development  of  Whatcom  county 
for  more  than  a  third  of  a  century.  He  was  one  of  the  pioneers  of  Ferndale 
and  has  been  active  in  its  public  affairs  as  councilman  and  mayor.  He  was 
born  in  Pennsylvania  in  1856  and  on  leaving  the  Keystone  state  in  1883.  when 
a  young  man  of  twenty-seven  years,  removed  westward  to  Washington.  He 
made  his  way  to  Seattle,  afterward  spent  a  brief  period  at  Port  Blakeley  and 
then  by  boat  went  to  Bellingham,  there  being  no  trains  or  wagon  roads  at  that 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  197 

time  to  Bellingham.  From  the  latter  place  he  followed  a  trail  to  Ferndale, 
where  he  found  a  few  people  and  one  store  and  a  blacksmith  shop.  That  con- 
stituted the  entire  settlement.  He  took  up  government  land,  securing  one  hun- 
dred and  sixty  acres  which  was  entirely  destitute  of  improvements.  He  soon 
afterward  returned  to  Port  Blakeley,  where  he  remained  for  another  year,  and 
then  again  came  to  Ferndale,  where  he  established  a  store,  continuing  to  engage 
in  general  merchandising  on  his  own  account  until  191 5,  when  his  establish- 
ment was  destroyed  by  fire.  Since  that  time  he  has  been  manager  of  another 
store  and  thus  remains  an  active  factor  in  the  commercial  life  of  the  community. 
In  1893  Mr.  Wilson  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Maggie  Roessel,  of 
Ferndale,  who  was  born  in  Michigan.  They  hold  membership  in  the  Congre- 
gational church,  and  fraternally  Mr.  Wilson  is  connected  with  the  Knights  of 
Pythias  and  with  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks  at  Bellingham.  His 
political  endorsement  is  given  to  the  republican  party,  and  he  has  done  effective 
work  for  public  progress  as  an  office  holder.  He  has  served  as  a  member  of 
the  city  council  and  for  two  terms  was  mayor  of  Ferndale,  his  influence  being 
always  on  the  side  of  progress  and  improvement.  It  was  during  his  incum- 
bency in  that  office  that  the  paving  was  done  and  the  sidewalks  built  in  Fern- 
dale. He  has  long  been  a  prominent  and  active  member  of  the  Whatcom  County 
Pioneers  Association,  which  he  joined  on  its  organization  and  which  now  has 
a  membership  of  three  hundred  and  fifty.  For  eight  years  he  served  as  its 
president  and  he  greatly  enjoys  meeting  with  the  early  residents  of  the  county, 
their  memories  of  pioneer  times  forming  a  strong  connecting  link  between  them. 


JACOB  BETZ. 


Jacob  Betz,  ever  a  good  citizen,  active  in  support  and  furtherance  of  Tacoma's 
best  interests,  was  born  on  the  loth  of  November,  1843,  in  the  Rhine  province 
of  Bavaria,  Germany,  and  his  life  record  spanned  the  intervening  years  to  the 
1 6th  of  November,  191 2.  He  was  educated  in  the  schools  of  Germany  and 
America,  having  been  brought  to  this  country  in  1848  when  a  little  lad  of  but 
five  summers.  He  arrived  in  California  before  the  Civil  war  and  there  engaged 
in  mining  until  1870,  when  he  removed"  to  Walla  Walla,  Washington,  where 
he  erected  a  brewery  which  he  operated  for  a  long  period.  During  his  resi- 
dence in  eastern  Washington  his  interests  became  extensive  but  at  length  he 
disposed  of  all  of  his  holdings  in  that  part  of  the  state  and  in  i(p4  established 
his  home  in  Tacoma.  Here  he  purchased  the  Sprague  block  on  Pacific  avenue 
and  at  once  began  to  remodel  the  building,  which  he  improved  in  every  way. 
He  converted  it  into  two  hotels  and  also  changed  the  store  buildings  and  he 
installed  therein  the  largest  heating  plant  in  the  city.  He  also  purchased  the 
Hosmer  residence  at  610  Broadway  and  remodeled  it  into  a  most  beautiful  and 
attractive  home.  Since  his  death  his  family  have  carried  out  his  plans  and  have 
erected  an  addition  to  the  Sprague  block  on  Fifteenth  street.  This  property 
affords  an  excellent  income  to  his  heirs. 

Mr.  Betz  was  married  in  Walla  Walla  to  Miss  Augusta  Wilson,  who  re- 
moved from  California  to  Washington  in   1866.     To  them  were  born  five  chil- 


198  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

dren,  namely:     Katherine;  Jacob,  Jr.,  who  is  deceased;  Eleanor;   Harry;  and 
Augustus. 

Mr.  Betz  was  appreciative  of  the  social  amenities  of  life  and  found  pleasant 
companionship  in  the  Union  and  Country  Clubs,  of  both  of  which  he  was  a 
member.  He  also  belonged  to  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  in  which 
he  filled  all  of  the  chairs.  In  politics  he  was  a  republican,  ever  active  in  sup- 
port of  the  party,  working  earnestly  for  its  interests.  Five  times  he  was  honored 
with  election  to  the  mayoralty  of  Walla  Walla  and  five  times  to  the  city  council 
and  it  was  during  his  administration  that  the  waterworks  fight  in  Walla  Walla 
was  on.  He  won  the  case  for  the  city  in  the  United  States  supreme  court  and 
thus  gave  to  the  city  one  of  its  most  important  public  utilities.  In  business  and 
in  public  afifairs  his  judgment  was  keen  and  penetrating  and  his  opinions  sound 
and  logical.  What  he  accomplished  represented  the  fit  utilization  of  his  innate 
powers  and  talents. 


JOHN  E.  GILCHRIST. 


John  E.  Gilchrist,  owner  of  the  Willapa  Harbor  Iron  Works  at  South  Bend, 
began  business  at  his  present  location  in  a  small  way  as  a  blacksmith  in  1890 
and  from  that  humble  beginning  has  developed  his  present  extensive  plant,  mak- 
ing his  one  of  the  foremost  industrial  concerns  of  the  town.  He  is  a  native  of 
Scotland,  his  birth  having  occurred  at  Greenock  in  i860.  He  attended  the  public 
schools  there  and  afterward  learned  the  ship  blacksmith's  trade.  He  came  to 
the  United  States  when  twenty-three  years  of  age,  thinking  to  find  better  busi- 
ness opportunities  on  this  side  the  Atlantic,  and  in  1883  he  made  his  way  direct 
to  Idaho,  after  which  he  engaged  in  blacksmithing  at  the  various  mining  camps. 
From  Idaho  he  came  to  South  Bend  and  began  business  at  his  present  location 
in  a  small  way  as  a  blacksmith  in  1890.  He  afterward  built  a  logging  equipment 
with  the  famous  Gilchrist  self-oiling  blocks  and  the  output  of  his  establishment, 
the  Hercules  logging  jack,  has  been  shipped  to  all  parts  of  the  world,  a  shipment 
being  made  to  Siam  in  ]\Iay,  191 6.  He  makes  all  kinds  of  marine  engine  repairs 
and  mill  repairs  and  in  his  foundry  is  done  all  kinds  of  iron  casting.  His  black- 
smith shop  is  splendidly  equipped  for  light  and  heavy  work  of  all  kinds  and 
twelve  men,  all  skilled  mechanics  and  draughtsmen,  are  employed.  Mr.  Gilchrist 
started  out  as  a  blacksmith  but  has  gradually  worked  his  way  upward  in  con- 
nection with  mill  and  logging  work.  He  has  added  machinery  and  all  the  most 
modern  equipment  for  a  machine  shop  and  he  is  the  possessor  of  twelve  dififerent 
patents  on  heavy  logging  machinery.  He  originated  the  high  lead  block,  used 
as  the  most  modern  method  of  logging,  and  he  manufactures  blocks  weighing 
from  twenty-five  to  nine  hundred  and  fifty  pounds  each.  He  was  also  the  orig- 
inator of  the  Gilchrist  logging  jack,  a  most  powerful  one,  whereby  two  men  can 
lift  sixteen  tons.  Mr.  Gilchrist  is  today  a  very  prosperous  business  man  and  is 
one  of  South  Bend's  citizens  whose  record  is  at  all  times  creditable.  His  plant 
is  operated  continuously,  for  he  never  lost  a  day  during  the  hard  times,  and  he 
pays  excellent  salaries  to  his  employes,  giving  to  each  one  a  fair  living  wage. 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  199 

At  the  Alaska-Yukon  Exposition,  held  in  Seattle,  he  received  the  gold  medal  and 
the  grand  prize  for  the  Hercules  logging  jack  sheaves  and  logging  block. 

Mr.  Gilchrist  holds  membership  in  the  Commercial  Club  and  he  gives  his 
political  allegiance  to  the  republican  party.  He  is  especially  fond  of  children,  his 
sympathies  going  out  at  all  times  to  them,  and  he  is  a  public-spirited  man  who 
never  withholds  his  aid  or  cooperation  from  any  movement  that  he  believes  will 
benefit  the  community. 


WILLIAM  H.  BONER. 


William  H.  Boner,  manager  at  Everett  for  the  Weyerhaeuser  Lumber  Com- 
pany, has  through  the  steps  of  an  orderly  progression  worked  his  way  upward 
to  his  present  position  of  trust  and  responsibility  in  business  circles.  He  was 
born  in  Milan,  Sullivan  county,  Missouri,  January  23,  1863.  His  father,  Henry 
Boner,  a  native  of  Indiana,  was  a  son  of  Henry  Boner,  Sr.,  who  was  born  in  the 
north  of  Ireland  and  became  the  founder  of  the  American  branch  of  the  family, 
settling  in  Indiana  His  son  and  namesake  became  a  successful  merchant  of 
Milan.  Missouri,  where  for  many  years  he  also  filled  the  position  of  postmaster. 
At  the  time  of  the  Civil  war  he  put  aside  all  business  and  personal  consider- 
ations in  order  to  espouse  the  Union  cause  and  went  to  the  front  with  a  Missouri 
regiment  of  volunteers.  His  wife,  who  bore  the  maiden  name  of  Mary  Smith, 
is  a  native  of  Pennsylvania  and  a  daughter  of  William  Smith  of  EngHsh  birth, 
settling  in  the  Keystone  state  on  coming  from  England  to  the  new  world. 
Henry  Boner  has  now  passed  away,  but  his  widow  survives  and  resides  at  the  old 
home  in  Milan.  Two  of  their  children  are  yet  living.  William  H.  and  John,  the 
latter  also  a  resident  of  Milan. 

William  H.  Boner  acquired  his  education  in  the  public  and  high  schools  of 
his  native  city  and  also  attended  a  business  college.  On  attaining  his  majority 
he  started  out  in  life  independently,  establishing  a  retail  lumberyard  at  Milan, 
in  which  business  he  engaged  successfully  for  a  time,  and  for  a  period  of  four 
years  he  was  also  in  business  in  Nebraska.  Thinking  to  find  broader  opportu- 
nities in  the  northwest,  he  came  to  the  Pacific  coast  in  1889  and  for  a  brief  period 
was  with  the  Northwestern  Lumber  Company  at  Hoquiam.  from  which  point 
he  was  transferred  to  South  Bend.  Later  the  business  was  conducted  under  the 
name  of  the  Simpson  Lumber  Company  and  for  seventeen  years  Mr.  Boner  was 
associated  with  that  company  in  the  capacity  of  general  manager,  developing 
the  business  to  large  and  important  proportions.  In  1907  he  became  connected 
with  the  Weyerhaeuser  Lumber  Company  at  Everett,  taking  charge  of  the  busi- 
ness, and  as  manager  has  since  conducted  the  interests  of  the  company  at  that 
place.  Throughout  his  entire  business  career  he  has  been  connected  with  the 
lumber  trade  and  there  is  no  phase  of  the  business,  from  the  point  of  its  initial 
development  to  the  time  when  sales  are  consummated,  with  which  he  is  not  thor- 
oughly familiar.  That  important  interests  are  now  in  his  control  is  indicated 
in  the  fact  that  at  the  Weyerhaeuser  plant  in  Everett  employment  is  furnished 
to  six  hundred  people  and  they  turn  out  seven  hundred  and  fifty  thousand 
feet  of  lumber  in  ten  hours.     He  also  has  supervision  over  the  Bayside  plant, 


200  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

which  covers  thirty-six  acres,  and  a  new  plant  of  eighty  acres  on  the  river  side 
at  Everett.  In  addition  to  his  connection  with  the  lumber  trade  Mr.  Boner  is  a 
director  of  the  First  National  Bank  of  Everett. 

In  1888,  at  Milan,  Missouri,  occurred  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Boner  and  Miss 
Tennessee  Winters,  a  native  of  Missouri  and  a  daughter  of  James  and  Nancy 
(McAfee)  Winters,  representatives  of  an  old  Missouri  family.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Boner  have  two  children :  Beatrice,  born  in  Milan ;  and  I'Lee,  born  in  Everett. 
The  family  reside  at  No.  3306  Norton  avenue. 

Politically  Mr.  Boner  is  a  republican,  well  versed  on  the  questions  and  issues 
of  the  day  but  without  ambition  in  the  line  of  office  holding.  He  belongs  to  the 
Cascade  Club  and  to  the  Everett  Golf  and  Country  Club  and  he  is  also  an  active 
supporter  of  the  Commercial  Club.  He  displays  the  spirit  of  western  enterprise 
which  has  brought  about  the  phenomenal  growth  and  development  of  the  Pacific 
northwest  and  his  own  career  is  an  exemplification  of  the  possibilities  of  accom- 
plishment in  a  business  way  in  this  favored  section  of  the  country. 


DONALD  E.  ?^IcGILLIVRAY,  M.  D. 

■  Dr.  Donald  E.  McGillivray,  one  of  the  founders  and  promoters  of  the  Port 
Angeles  General  Hospital,  has  gained  enviable  distinction  in  professional  ranks 
and  yet  has  not  confined  his  efiforts  solely  to  a  single  line,  for  he  is  also  a  promi- 
nent figure  in  financial  circles  and  in  citizenship  has  contributed  largely  to  public 
progress  and  improvement.  He  was  born  in  Ontario,  Canada,  June  2,  1872,  a 
son  of  Cornelius  and  Mary  (Nicholson)  McGillivray,  natives  of  Scotland  and 
of  Canada  respectively.  In  his  boyhood  Cornelius  McGillivray  came  to  the  new 
world  with  his  father,  Malcolm  McGillivray.  He  was  reared,  educated  and  mar- 
ried in  Ontario  and  there  engaged  in  business  as  a  contractor,  as  a  lumberman 
and  as  a  farmer,  remaining  in  that  country  until  his  death,  which  occurred  May 
12,  1916,  when  he  was  seventy-three  years  of  age.  His  widow  survives  at  the 
age  of  sixty-six  years. 

Dr.  McGillivray,  the  eldest  of  their  nine  children,  attended  the  Canadian 
schools  in  his  boyhood  days  and  afterward  became  a  student  in  the  College  of 
Kincardine,  Ontario,  and  also  in  Trinity  University  of  Ontario,  from  which  he 
was  graduated  in  1899  on  the  completion  of  a  course  in  medicine.  He  entered 
upon  active  practice  in  his  native  country  but  in  1900  removed  to  Port  Angeles, 
where  he  has  since  practiced  with  eminent  success,  his  ability  growing  as  the 
result  of  his  further  varied  study  and  broad  experience.  For  many  years  he  has 
been  recognized  as  one  of  the  best  physicians  and  surgeons  in  the  Pacific  north- 
west. Realizing  the  need  of  a  hospital  in  Port  Angeles,  he  joined  with  S.  W. 
Hartt  in  establishing  the  Port  Angeles  General  Hospital,  but  Dr.  McGillivray 
has  been  in  complete  control  and  ownership  for  a  long  time.  In  recognition  of 
his  surgical  skill  many  important  cases  for  operation  have  been  taken  imme- 
diately to  the  hospital,  where  they  have  been  treated  with  uniform  success,  adding 
further  to  the  reputation  of  the  institution.  The  latest  surgical  and  hospital  ap- 
pliances and  equipment  have  been  provided  and  most  competent  nurses  are 
employed,  ensuring  the  best  care  and  attention.     During  the  period  of  his  resi- 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  201 

dence  in  the  northwest  Dr.  McGillivray  has  acquired  a  large  amount  of  property. 
He  has  also  become  actively  interested  in  the  banking  business  as  a  stockholder, 
a  director  and  vice  president  of  the  Port  Angeles  Savings  Bank. 

In  June,  1903,  in  Port  Angeles,  Dr.  McGillivray  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Miss  Corinne  Lane,  a  daughter  of  Albert  D.  Lane,  of  Montpelier,  Vermont,  whose 
father  was  the  founder  of  the  Lane  Manufacturing  Company.  Dr.  and  Mrs. 
McGillivray  hold  membership  in  the  Episcopal  church  and  he  stands  very  high 
in  Masonic  circles,  holding  membership  in  Nile  Temple  of  the  Mystic  Shrine  at 
Seattle.  He  also  belongs  to  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  the 
Knights  of  Pythias.  He  is  deeply  interested  in  community  affairs  and  for  ten 
years  served  as  county  physician  and  has  also  been  president  of  the  board  of 
education.  He  belongs  to  the  Clallam  County,  the  Washington  State  and  the 
American  Medical  Associations,  was  a  delegate  to  the  convention  of  the  last 
named  at  Detroit  in  191 6  and  has  been  elected  as  delegate  to  the  convention  to  be 
held  in  December,  191 7,  in  New  York  city.  He  stands  very  high  in  professional 
circles  and  has  the  largest  practice  in  Clallam  county  and  yet  he  finds  time  for 
cooperation  in  affairs  of  general  moment.  He  has  taken  a  deep  interest  in  all 
civic  questions  and  particularly  in  educational  matters  and  as  president  of  the 
school  board  for  the  last  eight  years  has  done  much  to  bring  the  schools  of  Port 
Angeles  to  their  present  high  standing  and  is  very  largely  responsible  for  the  erec- 
tion of  the  new  high  school  building  which  constitutes  a  most  attractive  feature 
of  Port  Angeles'  present  school  system.  Progressiveness  has  been  the  keynote 
of  his  character,  dominating  him  in  every  relation. 


HERMAN  CHAPIN. 


Herman  Chapin  has  been  a  prominent  figure  in  financial  circles  in  Seattle 
for  almost  three  decades  and  is  thoroughly  familiar  with  the  history  of  business 
advancement  here.  Plis  capability  in  recognizing  and  utilizing  opportunities  has 
been  a  strong  feature  in  his  growing  success  and  his  course  is  indicative  of  what 
may  be  accomplished  when  determination  and  laudable  ambition  lead  the  way. 

Mr.  Chapin  was  born  at  Brookline,  Massachusetts,  on  the  29th  of  June,  1858, 
his  parents  being  Nathaniel  Gates  and  Harriet  Louisa  Chapin.  He  prepared  for 
college  at  the  school  conducted  by  H.  W.  C.  Noble  at  No.  40  Winter  street, 
Boston,  and  in  1875  he  entered  Harvard  College,  from  which  he  was  graduated 
in  1879  w^th  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts.  Following  his  graduation  he  was 
associated  for  nine  months  with  the  firm  of  Chapin  &  Edwards,  of  Chicago,  the 
senior  partner  being  his  brother.  Later  he  was  connected  with  the  Massachusetts 
National  Bank  in  Boston  and  in  August,  1886,  he  came  to  Seattle,  where  he 
organized  the  Boston  National  Bank  in  the  fall  of  1889.  In  the  meantime,  or 
in  1887-88,  he  erected  the  Boston  block  and  Colonial  building  at  Second  avenue 
and  Columbia  street  and  a  row  of  houses  on  Pike  street  and  Sixth  avenue,  thus 
becoming  identified  with  the  material  improvement  of  the  city.  At  intervals 
during  the  succeeding  fifteen  years  he  erected  the  Rialto  building  at  Second 
avenue  and  Madison  street,  the  MacDougall  and  Southwick  building  at  Second 
avenue  and   Pike  street,  the  Seattle  National  Bank  building  at  Second  avenue 


202  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

and  Columbia  street  (the  successor  to  the  Colonial  building),  the  Pythian  building 
at  First  avenue  and  Pike  street,  the  Bon  Marche  building  at  First  avenue  and 
Union  street,  the  W.  P.  Fuller  building  at  second  avenue  and  Jackson  street, 
and  the  wholesale  building  at  Third  avenue  South  and  Jackson  street.  His 
operations  have  thus  been  extensive  in  building  lines  and  Seattle  owes  many  of 
her  finest  structures  to  his  efforts.  Moreover,  he  has  figured  equally  prominently 
in  financial  circles,  having  been  president  of  the  Boston  National  Bank  for  about 
fifteen  years,  president  of  the  Washington  Savings  &  Loan  Association  for  seven- 
teen years  and  a  director  of  the  Seattle  National  Bank  for  several  years. 

On  the  15th  of  June,  1898,  in  Seattle,  Mr.  Chapin  was  united  in  marriage 
to  Miss  Mary  Arquit,  who  died  July  17,  1900.  Mr.  Chapin  is  a  Unitarian  by 
birth  and  association  and  in  politics  is  a  republican  but  not  an  aggressive  partisan. 
He  belongs  to  the  most  prominent  clubs  of  the  city,  including  the  Rainier,  the 
University,  the  Athletic,  the  College  and  the  Seattle  Golf  Clubs  of  Seattle,  and 
to  the  Union  Club  of  Tacoma.  An  eminent  statesman  has  said  that  the  finest 
type  of  American  citizen  is  the  man  who  is  born  and  reared  in  the  east  but  seeks 
the  west  with  its  opportunities,  in  which  to  give  scope  to  his  dominant  qualities. 
The  training  and  culture  of  the  east  find  a  field  of  expression  in  shaping  the 
golden  west  and  in  developing  the  great  cosmopolitan  cities  which  have  sprung  up 
on  the  Pacific  coast.  Such  has  been  the  work  of  Herman  Chapin,  and  his  eft'orts 
has  been  far-reaching  and  beneficial,  constituting  an  important  element  in  Seattle's 
advancement  and  prosperity. 


JAMES  STEWART. 

There  was  no  Aberdeen  and  there  were  but  two  families  on  the  river  and  but 
eight  hundred  inhabitants  in  Chehalis  county  when  James  Stewart,  now  deceased, 
became  one  of  the  residents  of  Chehalis,  now  Grays  Harbor,  county,  and  from 
that  time  forw^ard  until  his  death  he  was  closely  connected  with  the  development 
and  upbuilding  of  his  adopted  state.  He  was  born  in  Perthshire,  Scotland,  in 
1840,  and  had  therefore  reached  the  sixty-sixth  milestone  on  life's  journey  when 
he  passed  away  in  Aberdeen  on  the  30th  of  May,  1906.  He  had  come  to 
America  in  i860.  In  his  boyhood  days  he  had  learned  the  stonemason's  trade  and 
much  of  his  life  was  devoted  to  business  of  that  character.  Early  in  i860  he  went 
to  Mobile,  Alabama,  and  he  was  much  interested  in  the  question  of  the  abolition 
of  slavery.  While  he  was  in  that  city  the  Civil  war  broke  out  and  he  was  forced 
to  enlist  in  the  southern  army,  becoming  a  member  of  the  Mississippi  Rifles,  into 
which  he  was  mustered  in  April,  1861.  by  Joe  Davis,  a  brother  of  Jefferson 
Davis.  As  soon  as  possible,  however,  he  left  the  Confederate  forces  and  in 
May  joined  the  Union  armv  as  a  member  of  Company  D,  Fifth  Ohio  Infantry, 
under  Captain  Hayes.  After  two  months  at  Camp  Denison  the  troops  were 
sent  to  Parkersburg,  West  Virginia,  and  the  first  battle  in  which  Mr.  Stewart 
participated  was  at  Baleus  Gap  in  1862.  He  also  took  part  in  the  engagement 
at  Paw  Paw  Station  and  was  at  Winchester,  Kentucky,  under  General  Shields, 
where  in  the  fierceness  of  the  conflict  the  colors  were  shot  into  tatters.  He  was 
also  at  Fort  Republic,  where  his  regiment  lost  one  hundred  and  eighty  in  dead 


JAMES  STEWART 


THE   NEW   YOKK 
PUBLIC  LIBRARY 


ASTOK,    LENOX 
TILDEN  FOUNDATION 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  205 

and  wounded.  He  was  likewise  at  Culpeper  and  at  Cedar  Mountain,  was  in  the 
battles  of  Bull  Run,  Antietam,  Bristow's  Station,  Fairfax  Courthouse  and  South 
Mountain.  After  a  few  weeks  spent  in  winter  quarters  the  regiment  was  sent  to 
reinforce  General  Burnside  at  Fredericksburg  but  was  stopped  on  account  of 
bad  roads.  In  January,  1863,  they  participated  in  a  hotly  contested  engagement 
at  Dumfries  and  later  they  were  at  Aqua  Creek,  where  Mr.  Stewart's  command 
became  a  part  of  the  Twelfth  Army  Corps  upon  its  reorganization  under  General 
Slocum.  He  later  participated  in  the  hotly  contested  engagement  at  Chancellors- 
ville,  lasting  three  days,  and  through  Maryland  marched  northward  to  Gettysburg, 
also  taking  part  in  the  three  days'  sanguinary  conflict  at  that  place.  With  his 
command  he  was  then  sent  to  New  York  to  aid  in  quelling  a  riot  and  two  weeks 
later  was  in  Washington,  D.  C,  where  his  corps  was  consolidated  with  the 
Eleventh  Army  Corps  and  subsequently  became  a  part  of  the  Twentieth  Army 
Corps  under  General  Hooker.  Mr.  Stewart  went  with  the  Army  of  the  Cumber- 
land to  Lookout  Mountain,  where  he  participated  in  the  battle  of  the  clouds,  and 
was  afterward  in  the  engagements  at  Missionary  Ridge.  Buzzards  Roost  and 
Bridgeport.  Early  in  1864  he  took  part  in  the  battle  of  Resaca,  a  most  terrific 
conflict,  in  which  the  regiment  was  torn  to  pieces.  All  of  the  original  members 
of  the  regiment  were  afterwards  sent  to  Cincinnati  and  there  mustered  out  after 
rendering  more  than  three  years'  service  to  the  Union  cause.  In  April,  1865,  he 
reenlisted  with  Hancock's  Veterans,  becoming  a  member  of  Company  D  of  the 
Eighth  Regiment,  under  Colonel  Pierce.  With  that  command  he  was  sent  to 
Washington  for  guard  duty  and  on  to  Trenton,  New  Jersey,  but  later  returned 
to  Washington,  where  he  was  mustered  out,i  reaching  Cincinnati  in  1866.  This 
was  one  of  the  few  regiments  which  as  aii  organization  returned,  but  only  nine- 
teen of  the  original  troops  were  left. 

In  July,  1867,  Mr.  Stewart  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Jean  Brodie 
Kelman  at  Cincinnati,  Ohio.  She  was  born  in  Aberdeen,  Scotland,  December  22, 
1847,  and  the  following  spring  was  brought  by  her  parents  to  America,  the 
voyage  being  made  in  one  of  the  old-time  sailing  vessels.  They  first  went'  to 
Canada  but  thence  removed  to  Cincinnati,  Ohio.  The  father  was  a  baker  by 
trade  and  in  his  business  met  with  both  reverses  and  success.  He  passed  away 
in  Cincinnati,  after  which  his  widow  removed  to  Rock  Island,  Illinois,  and 
subsequently  to  Aberdeen,  Washington,  where  she  died  at  a  very  advanced  age. 

Following  his  marriage  Mr.  Stewart  worked  on  the  Lincoln  monument  at 
Springfield,  Illinois,  and  was  afterward  at  Carlinville,  at  Chicago  and  at  Rock 
Island,  that  state.  He  started  for  the  western  coast  on  the  6th  of  January.  1875. 
making  his  way  to  British  Columbia,  after  which  he  engaged  in  contracting  and 
building  at  Nanaimo,  building  a  bonded  warehouse  for  Hurst  &  Company.  He 
then  went  to  Seattle,  where  he  became  a  contractor  for  the  stonemason  work 
on  the  original  Dexter  Horton  Bank  building.  Later  he  went  to  Tacoma,  where 
he  aided  in  building  the  Annie  Wright  church,  and  in  September,  1875,  he  arrived 
in  what  is  now  Aberdeen.  While  in  Seattle  Mr.  Yesler  assisted  Mr.  Stewart  in 
obtaining  living  quarters  in  a  house  which  was  next  door  to  the  old  pavilion. 
At  that  time  Aberdeen  did  not  exist.  Mr.  Stewart  purchased  the  old  Scammon 
homestead  of  three  hundred  acres,  most  of  which  was  covered  with  timber,  only 
a  small  portion  having  been  cleared.  He  turned  his  attention  to  farming  but 
was  not  successful  in  that  undertaking  and  left  Aberdeen  for  California,  where 

Toi.  n— 11 


206  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

he  obtained  work  at  his  trade  in  order  to  obtain  more  funds,  remaining  some 
time  and  then  returning  to  Washington.  Later  when  the  Hoquiam  mill  was 
located,  Mr.  Stewart  began  getting  out  logs  for  the  mill  and  continued  in  that 
business.  From  time  to  time  he  purchased  other  property  until  he  became  the 
owner  of  twelve  hundred  acres  of  timber  land  in  addition  to  his  original  claim. 
He  met  many  hardships  in  the  early  days  and  the  things  which  he  was  forced  to 
endure  in  gaining  a  start  undermined  his  health,  but  he  possessed  marked  energy 
and  determination  and  would  not  give  up. 

To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Stewart  were  born  eight  children,  but  only  two  are  living, 
Albert  James  and  Malcolm  MacKinzie,  both  residents  of  Aberdeen  and  estab- 
lished in  business  there.  Mr.  Stewart  was  always  greatly  interested  in  the 
upbuilding  of  the  city  and  served  as  one  of  its  early  councilmen.  He  was  a  man 
of  very  generous  spirit.  His  life  was  at  all  times  honorable  and  upright  and 
gained  for  him  the  enduring  regard  of  all  with  whom  he  was  brought  in  contact. 

Mrs.  Stewart  still  makes  her  home  in  Aberdeen  and  is  a  very  active  woman, 
having  taken  up  the  business  left  by  her  husband.  She,  too,  has  ever  worked 
untiringly  and  effectively  for  the  welfare  of  the  community  and  it  was  she  who 
suggested  the  name  of  Aberdeen  for  the  town,  which  name  was  accepted  by 
Mr.  Benn,  the  founder  of  the  city.  She  has  never  failed  to  extend  a  helping  hand 
whenever  she  could  to  a  fellow  traveler  on  life's  journey.  Her  splendid  business 
ability,  her  executive  force,  her  benevolence  and  kindliness  have  all  combined  to 
make  her  one  of  the  valued  residents  of  Aberdeen.  She  possesses  notable  mental 
and  moral  force  and  she  and  her  husband  have  made  the  name  of  Stewart  an 
honored  one  throughout  their  part  of  the  state.  Mrs.  Stewart  has  written  much 
over  a  period  of  years  in  both  prose  and  poetry,  her  contributions  appearing  in 
various  papers  in  the  east.  Her  work  is  of  high  order  and  we  append  herewith 
a  poem  which  was  read  at  the  191 1  Christmas  meeting  of  the  Aberdeen  Pioneer 
Association. 

The  ties  are  there,  the  rails  are  here, 

In  front  of  my  own  door  ; 

The  longed  for  time  has  come  at  last, 

The  anxious  days  are  o'er. 

I  waited  nearly  forty  years 

To  see  that  track  laid  down. 

For,  do  you  know?     We  dreamed  of  it 

Before  this  was  a  town. 

When  bruin  roamed  these  hills  at  large 

With  little  to  molest ; 

When  in  the  tall  trees'  topmost  boughs 

The  eagle  built  its  nest ; 

When  antlered  elk  and  timid  deer 

Came  hither  unafraid, 

And  pheasants  reared  their  pretty  broods, 

In  every  mossy  glade. 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  207 

When  flocks  of  migratory  geese 
Would  light  to  browse  the  grass, 
And  ducks  that  drifted  in  the  stream 
In  noisy  glee  would  pass. 
The  very  fishes  were  so  tame 
It  seemed  a  cruel  sin, 
That  we  should  use  a  hook  and  line 
To  draw  the  creatures  in. 

I  well  remember  one  great  bird 

That  was,  indeed,  a  friend, 

It  roosted  in  a  dead  spruce  tree 

Which  stood  at  Stewart's  bend. 

From  there,  this  self  appointed  guard. 

Relieving  us  of  fear, 

Would  fly  above  the  stream  and  croak, 

If  anything  came  near. 

And  no  one  ever  dipped  an  oar. 

Nor  drifted  with  the  tide. 

Who  reached  our  dwelling  unannounced, 

Until  the  old  crane  died. 

We  missed  its  signal  very  much 

And  mourned  a  faithful  friend, 

Long  after  it  had  ceased  to  guard 

The  eddy  at  the  bend. 

Now,  up  the  Wishkah,  as  of  old, 
We  drift  again  entranced. 
How  fondly  memory  lingers  where 
The  sun  kissed  ripples  danced. 
Then,  passing  into  deeper  shade. 
While  every  care  takes  wing; 
Watches  the  trout  dart  in  and  out, 
And  hears  the  wild  birds  sing. 

Each  bend,  more  charming  than  the  last, 

Seems  an  enchanted  lake. 

Its  banks  embroidered  gorgeously 

With  blooming  shrubs  and  brake — 

I  wonder,  when  the  evil  one 

Disturbed  its  dream  of  bliss, 

Were  Eden's  streams  more  clear,  more  calm, 

More  beautiful  than  this? 

Was  the  sky  o'er  Eden  bluer? 
Was  the  breeze  more  soft  and  sweet? 
With  a  rhythm  that  is  truer 
Did  the  heart  of  nature  beat? 


208  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

Did  the  creatures  from  the  forest 
View  man  with  less  of  fear? 
Did  Eve  and  Adam  loitering  there 
Feel  God  more  strangely  near! 

Those  dear,  dear  days  of  auld  lang  syne, 

How  full,  how  rich  they  were ! 

The  memories  that  round  them  twine 

My  deepest  being  stir — 

O,  Time,  withhold  your  ruthless  hands. 

Stay  your  rapacious  will. 

Though  life  must  fail,  leave  memory 

My  latest  pulse  to  thrill ! 

This  was  an  isolated  land. 

Across  our  harbor  bar. 

No  ship  came  in  from  any  port. 

By  any  chart  or  star. 

Yet,  not  for  this  did  courage  fail, 

We  knew  a  way  was  clear. 

For  Captain  Gray,  long  years  before. 

Had  safely  anchored  here. 

Of  male  and  female,  old  and  young. 

The  population  then. 

For  miles  and  miles,  round  here  about, 

Was  less  than  ten  times  ten. 

Our  neighbors  being  thus  remote. 

And  trails  so  very  few, 

Of  course  we  learned  to  row  a  boat 

Or  paddle  a  canoe. 

We  gave  to  each  new  settler 

A  welcome  most  sincere. 

Nor  did  we  rate  them  then,  as  now, 

For  paltry  gold  or  gear. 

We  knew  each  had  intrinsic  worth, 

And  this  we  sought  to  find. 

One  passport  never  questioned 

Was  a  clean  and  lucid  mind. 

Lonesome,  you  ask?     How  could  we  be? 

We  had  our  books  and  flowers ; 

A  cozy  home ;  a  cheerful  hearth ; 

And  those  dear  babes  of  ours. 

And  hearts  aglow  with  gratitude 

To  Him  who  dwells  above, 

For  all  the  gifts  that  Nature  brings 

In  token  of  His  love. 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  209 

In  smiling  confidence  we  toiled, 

Hope  made  our  labor  light, 

We  gave  the  day  to  duty  and 

To  rest,  we  gave  the  night. 

And,  when  the  babes  were  tucked  away. 

What  wondrous  dreams  had  birth 

As  we  sat  and  watched  the  ruddv  flames 

That  flickered  on  the  hearth. 

We  saw  a  city  building  here, 

We  knew  it  would  be  great; 

And,  for  our  dreams'  fulfillment,  guessed 

We  had  not  long  to  wait. 

The  dense  old  forest  passed  away, 

And  every  sunny  slope 

Was  dotted  with  the  happy  homes 

Of  people  blessed  with  hope. 

We  could  hear  the  rattling  halyards 

Of  ships  to  come  from  sea ; 

Hear  the  shrieks  of  locomotives. 

Over  roads  that  were  to  be ; 

See  the  first  train  speeding  hither, 

With  Fate  aboard  to  drive, 

But  could  not  learn  the  scheduled  hours 

At  which  they  should  arrive. 

And  all  the  while  we  dreamed  those  dreams. 

The  ax,  the  frow,  the  maul. 

The  brushhook  and  the  cross-cut  saw, 

With  our  garden  tools,  were  all 

That  any  rancher  here  could  boast. 

No  wheel  had  yet  been  turned 

Of  all  the  vast  machinery 

Which  has  our  greatness  earned. 


&' 


To  claim  the  things  we  did  not  have 
A  healthy  memory  scorns. 
So,  I  admit,  our  finest  teams 
Had  bovine  hoofs  and  horns. 
If  put  upon  the  race  course. 
They  would  not  have  won  a  cheer; 
Yet,  for  a  downright,  nervy  tug, 
You  trust  the  brawny  steer. 

With  these,  their  only  helpers, 
And  the  tools  that  were  to  hand, 
The  pioneers  worked  skilfully 
To  open  this  good  land. 


210  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

Sometimes  they  toiled  in  weariness, 
Yet  not  as  slaves,  not  they ! 
For  love,  that  set  their  hardest  tasks, 
Lent  gladness  to  the  way. 

I  feel  my  pulses  bound  again. 
As  to  a  glorious  theme ; 
When  these  brave  men  and  women 
Rise  before  me  while  I  dream. 
For  no  philosopher  of  fame 
More  noble  lessons  taught : 
Nor  hero,  borne  from  any  field. 
With  greater  courage  fought. 

Ah !  Whither  shall  we  seek  them  now  ? 

A  few  are  with  us  still. 

But  some,  in  deep  forgetfulness, 

Are  sleeping  on  the  hill. 

Like  tears  of  sympathy  from  heaven, 

Dew  glitters  on  the  sod, 

That  wraps  the  graves  of  those  we  loved 

And  gave  again  to  God. 

'Tis  well.     Dear  Lord,  They  will  be  done. 

Thus  all  shall  slumber  soon! 

While  we  are  passing,  one  by  one, 

Our  anxious  hearts  attune 

To  that  sure,  simple,  childlike  faith 

That  leans  on  Thee  alone ; 

Knowing  that  whoso  asks  for  bread 

Shall  not  receive  a  stone. 

Your  pardon?     I  had  quite  digressed, 

How  memory  will  stray ! 

Let  us  go  back  and  view  the  work 

Accomplished  in  that  day. 

The  ax  swings  with  a  telling  stroke ; 

The  saw  triumphant  sings ; 

Earth  trembles,   for  the   tree   descends ; 

The  woodsman  backward  springs. 

•From  that  tall  cedar,  boards  were  rived 

To  build  our  homes.     The  stairs 

Were  rived  from  hemlock,  spruce  or  fir, 

Like  our  tables,  beds  and  chairs. 

Those  tables,  though  they  did  not  groan 

'Neath  festal  dainties,  yet, 

.A.fforded  many  a  wholesome  meal, 

\\'ith  careful  neatness  set. 


WASHINGTON.  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  211 

For  we  could  raise  the  biggest  spuds, 
My !  but  those  spuds  were  fine ! 
And  better  for  a  hungry  guest 
Then  a  banquet  served  with  wine. 
And  the  cream,  rich  and  delicious. 
The  butter,  fresh  and  sweet, 
Bacon  and  eggs,  all  home  produced, 
Would  tempt  a  king  to  eat. 

In  scattered  garden  patches. 

Which  were  cultivated  too. 

Crisp  lettuce,  radish,  cucumbers, 

Snap  beans  and  peas,  we  grew.  , 

These,  with  cabbage,  great,  white,  solid  heads, 

Squash,  turnips,  carrots,  beets. 

Onions  and  other  flavoring  herbs. 

Our  garden  list  completes. 

But  He  who  led  the  Israelites, 

And  led  the  pioneer. 

Had  made  provision,  long  before. 

To  welcome  us  with  cheer. 

So,  Nature,  with  most  lavish  hands, 

And  what  seemed  reckless  haste, 

Brought  forth,  in  great  variety. 

Fruits,  pleasing  to  the  taste. 

Which,  like  a  graceful  hedge,  compact. 

Skirted  the  river's  brink. 

Where  wild  things  came  at  morn  and  eve 

To  sun  themselves  and  drink. 

Each  hungry  creature  ate  its  fill, 

Yet  left  a  liberal  share : 

And,  when  we  all  were  satisfied. 

There  still  was  much  to  spare. 

Ah.  Thou,  most  generous  and  kind. 
Our  Father,  God  and  Friend, 
Who  fed  us  thus  abundantly. 
Still  to  our  wants  attend. 
And  give  to  each  that  purer  sense. 
Whereby  the  soul  may  see. 
Even  in  its  dreaded  journey  hence, 
A  loving  Deity. 

Up  the  Chehalis  river, 
Some  twelve  long  miles  or  more, 
At  a  place  called  Montesano  then. 
John  Esmond  kept  a  store. 


212  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

Another  place  of  merchandise 
Was  nowhere  to  be  found, 
So  far  as  we  had  knowledge  of, 
From  the  sea  to  Puget  Sound. 

And  there  we  did  our  purchasing. 

In  spring  and  summer  time, 

The  trips  between  were  full  of  joy, 

And  the  scenery  sublime. 

When  winter's  chilling  torrents  poured, 

And  waves  warred  with  the  breeze. 

Though  we  their  fury  oft  ignored, 

A  stout  heart  it  would  tease. 

And  once  a  fortnight,  rain  or  shine. 

We  used  to  trudge  the  trail ; 

Or  to  paddle  down  the  Wishkah 

Prospecting  for  the  mail. 

The  carrier,  en  route  below. 

When  tides  did  not  prevent, 

Would  leave  our  budget  at  "Benn's  Point" 

With  small  reward  content. 

Benn's,  Loos',  Tyler's,  Young's  and  we 

All  used  the  self-same  box. 

Nailed  firmly  to  a  great  spruce  tree, 

And  innocent  of  locks. 

Its  hinges,  if  my  memory  serves. 

Were  simply  cut  from  leather. 

Yet  it  sufficed  to  hold  the  mail 

Through  every  wind  and  weather. 

Though  letters,  and  the  magazines 

Were  very  precious  then, 

(For  weeks  must  pass  if  one  were  lost 

Ere  it  was  found  again). 

No  hint  of  insecurity 

Disturbed  us  while  we  slept. 

And  let  me  say,  the  mail  today 

Is  not  more  safely  kept. 

There  were  no  lawyers  here,  those  days. 
Nor  bitter — harsh  disputes. 
No  doctors ;  and  the  deaths  were  few. 
Few  preachers.     And  the  brutes, 
Who  masquerade  in  human   form. 
Were  rare,  yes,  rare  indeed. 
It  almost  seems  that  to  possess 
Is  to  create  the  need. 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  213 

How  changed — how  changed !      'Tis  wonderful 

Beyond  our  wildest  dreams. 

What  mighty  engines  have  displaced 

The  plodding  old  ox  teams. 

The  tallow  dip  has  given  way 

To  electricity. 

I  stagger  when  I  try  to  guess 

At  changes  yet  to  be. 

Like  riffles  curling  o'er  the  sands, 

A  human  tide  has  flowed, 

'Till  tens  of  thousands  dwell  today 

Where  once  that  few  abode. 

And  youths  who  now  are  in  their  teens. 

Think  well  ere  you  deny. 

Shall  see  a  half  a  million  here, 

Ere  they  are  old  as  I. 

Why  doubt?     Look  toward  the  east  and  see 

The  work  that  has  been  wrought 

While  electricity  applied 

Existed  but  in  thought. 

And  this  stupendous  factor. 

Conceive  what  it  must  mean ! 

Is  to  be  fully  utilized 

In  building   Aberdeen. 

And  your  own  loyalty  and  faith 

Are  mighty  factors  too; 

For  they  encourage  us  to  dare 

And  strengthen  us  to  do. 

"Tis  by  their  aid  that  we  accept 

The  bitter  with  the  sweet, 

Holding  the  city's  weal  above 

The  hardships  we  may  meet. 

Fate  fondly  nurtures  on  these  hills 

A  young  metropolis. 

Its  eager  lips  are  at  her  breast. 

She  bends  its  brow  to  kiss. 

And  heralds  now  are  faring  forth 

The  infant  to  proclaim. 

In  far  of¥  cities  of  the  world 

Their  torches  soon  shall  flame. 

Yet,  lonely  in  the  very  midst. 
Like  some  poor  orphaned  child, 
I  turn,  from  all  the  noise  and  glare, 
Back  to  the  forest  wild. 


214  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

Oh !  for  a  time,  however  brief, 

In  tangled  woods  to  stray — 

To  drift  and  dream  adown  the  stream 

One  day — one  bHssful  day ! 


CHARLES  WARREN  MAYNARD. 

Charles  Warren  Maynard,  manager  of  the  Olympia  Knitting  Mills  Company, 
deserves  practically  the  entire  credit  for  the  success  of  this  concern,  as  when  he 
took  charge  of  its  afifairs  it  was  on  the  verge  of  bankruptcy.  He  has  built  up 
its  business  until  its  trade  extends  into  many  sections  of  the  country  and  today 
It  is  one  of  the  leading  productive  industries  of  the  capital  city.  He  was  born  in 
Rockford,  Winnebago  county,  Illinois,  December  7,  1855,  a  son  of  Henry  and 
Lucy  Emeline  (Kilbourn)  Maynard,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  western 
Massachusetts  but  were  married  in  the  Prairie  state.  The  father  was  born  in 
1807  ^nd  was  therefore  thirty  years  of  age  when  in  1837  he  removed  westward  to 
Illinois,  which  was  then  still  sparsely  settled.  He  purchased  a  farm,  to  the 
operation  of  which  he  devoted  his  remaining  days,  dying  in  1865.  He  was  a 
republican  and  held  membership  in  the  Unitarian  church.  His  wife  passed  away 
in  1899,  when  ninety-three  years  old.     Three  of  their  six  children  survive. 

Charles  Warren  Maynard  completed  a  course  of  study  in  the  Rockford  (111.) 
Academy,  but  in  1872,  when  only  seventeen  years  old,  removed  to  Chehalis, 
Lewis  county,  Washington  territory.  For  a  time  he  worked  as  a  farm  hand  at 
twenty-five  dollars  a  month  and  board  and  later  rented  land,  which  he  cultivated 
successfully.  In  1880  he  gave  up  farming  and  engaged  in  the  hardware  business 
in  Chehalis,  becoming  in  time  the  leading  hardware  merchant  of  that  section. 
He  erected  a  fine  block,  in  which  he  housed  his  store,  and  invested  quite  heavily 
in  other  town  property.  He  was  one  of  the  founders  of  the  Chehalis  State  Bank 
and  also  a  director  therein.  In  1899  he  was  a  candidate  on  the  republican  ticket 
for  the  office  of  state  treasurer  and  although  he  made  only  a  few  campaign 
speeches  he  was  elected  and  in  the  discharge  of  his  responsible  duties  more  than 
justified  the  confidence  of  the  people  in  his  efficiency  and  trustworthiness.  Upon 
taking  that  office  he  disposed  of  his  hardware  business  and  upon  the  expiration  of 
his  term  in  1904  he  organized  the  St.  Helen  Condensing  Company  of  Chehalis. 
of  which  he  was  president  and  manager  until  the  business  was  sold  in  1906  to  the 
Pacific  Coast  Condensed  Milk  Company.  In  that  year  he  took  up  his  residence 
in  Olympia  and  for  three  years  lived  retired,  but  at  the  end  of  that  time  re- 
entered the  business  world,  becoming  secretary,  treasurer  and  manager  of  the 
Olympia  Knitting  Mills  Company,  which  was  then  almost  in  bankruptcy.  He  still 
retains  his  connection  with  the  company,  which  is  now  the  largest  one  of  its  kind 
m  the  northwest,  employing  fifty-five  people  in  the  factory  and  three  traveling 
salesmen,  who  cover  the  northwestern  states.  The  company  manufactures 
sweaters,  jerseys,  bathing  suits,  knitted  caps  and  toques  and  its  name  has  already 
become  synonymous  in  the  Puget  Sound  country  with  high  grade  material  and 
expert  workmanship. 

Mr.  Maynard  was  married  in  Chehalis  on  the  30th  of  March.  1876,  to  Miss 


CHARLES  W.   MAYNARD 


'^HE   NEW 


VORK 


ASTO 


FOUNDATI 


ON 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  217 

Mary  Alice  White,  a  native  of  Lewis  county,  Washington,  and  a  daughter  of 
Charles  F.  White,  who  was  one  of  the  early  pioneers  of  the  state.  They  are  the 
parents  of  five  children,  namely :  Clarence  Eugene,  who  operates  a  sawmill  at 
Little  Rock,  Washington;  Lucy  E.,  the  wife  of  Dr.  N.  J.  Redpath,  of  Olympia ; 
Alice,  the  wife  of  George  R.  Sibley,  manager  of  the  Pacific  Coast  Condensed 
Milk  Company  at  Chehalis ;  Bessie,  deceased ;  and  Everett,  twenty-one  years  old, 
who  is  now  in  the  employ  of  the  Olympia  Knitting  Mills  Company  and  is  learn- 
ing the  business. 

Mr.  Maynard  has  been  a  lifelong  republican  and  a  short  time  after  removing 
to  Washington  served  for  two  terms  as  treasurer  of  Lewis  county  and  later  was 
made  mayor  of  Chehalis.  He  belongs  to  the  Masons,  the  Independent  Order  of 
Odd  Fellows,  the  Knights  of  Pythias,  the  Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen, 
the  Elks  and  the  Chamber  of  Commerce.  Since  pioneer  days  he  has  been 
prominently  identified  with  the  state  and  as  agriculturist,  merchant,  state  official 
and  manufacturer  he  has  made  a  record  of  which  he  may  well  be  proud.  In 
all  that  he  has  done  integrity  and  faithfulness  to  trust  have  gone  hand  in  hand 
with  sound  judgment  and  marked  ability. 


FRED  STRAUB. 


It  seems  that  some  men  reach  success  not  by  a  slow  and  steady  progression 
but  rather  by  leaps  and  bounds,  and  such  has  been  the  record  of  Fred  Straub, 
whose  jewelry  establishment  at  Hoquiam  would  be  a  credit  to  a  city  of  much 
larger  size.  He  is  the  pioneer  jewelryman  of  that  place,  for  he  has  no  com- 
petitor there  who  has  so  long  been  in  the  same  line  of  business,  and,  more- 
over, he  has  always  maintained  his  position  of  leadership  in  the  nature  of  his 
store  and  stock  also.  In  a  word,  he  is  an  enterprising  and  farsighted  merchant 
and  brings  to  bear  in  the  conduct  of  his  interests  the  experience  of  thirty  years 
in  the  jewelry  trade. 

Mr.  Straub  has  always  lived  west  of  the  Mississippi,  his  birth  having  occurred 
at  Faribault,  Minnesota,  in  1869.  His  father,  Benjamin  F.  Straub,  a  native  of 
Pennsylvania,  was  for  a  long  period  engaged  in  the  jewelry  business  at  Faribault. 
He  was  attracted  by  the  opportunities  of  the  northwest  and  in  1910  removed  to 
Montesano,  Washington,  where  he  embarked  in  the  jewelry  business,  in  which 
he  continued  actively  to  the  time  of  his  death,  which  occurred  in  January,  1916, 
when  he  was  seventy-five  years  of  age.  The  mother,  who  died  in  1908  in  Minne- 
sota, bore  the  maiden  name  of  Charlotte  Jane  Yawney  and  was  a  native  of 
Michigan.     They  became  the  parents  of  four  children,  of  whom  three  are  living. 

Fred  Straub  was  reared  in  his  active  city  and  supplemented  his  public  school 
course  by  study  in  the  Shattuck  Military  Academy.  His  military  training  stood 
him  in  good  stead  at  the  time  of  the  outbreak  of  the  Spanish-American  war, 
when,  in  response  to  the  president's  call  for  troops,  he  enlisted  for  service  with 
Company  B,  of  the  Twelfth  Regiment  of  Minnesota  Volunteers,  of  which  he 
became  sergeant  major  and  later  lieutenant.  The  company  spent  eight  months 
in  camp  without  going  to  the  front,  but  the  men  had  proven  their  willingness  to 
aid  in  defending  American  interests. 


218  WASHINGTON^  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

In  1901  Mr.  Straub  was  married  in  Minnesota  to  Miss  Mollie  Hedges,  and 
in  1903  they  removed  to  the  west,  at  once  settHng  in  Hoquiam.  During  the  last 
four  years  of  his  residence  in  Minnesota  he  occupied  the  position  of  quarter- 
master of  the  State  Soldiers'  Home  under  appointment  of  Governor  Lind.  On 
arriving  in  Hoquiam  Mr.  Straub  embarked  in  the  jewelry  trade  on  his  own  account, 
opening  a  store  in  the  Werner  building  and  he  is  the  pioneer  jeweler  of  the 
harbor.  In  November,  1904,  he  removed  to  the  Philbrick  building  and  in  1906 
purchased  his  present  property  on  Eighth  street.  No  other  jewelry  merchant  of 
the  city  has  been  so  long  connected  with  the  trade  here  and  his  establishment 
has  ever  been  the  leader,  for  he  has  carried  a  most  attractive  line  of  goods.  He 
is  a  practical  watchmaker  and  does  repair  work  in  addition  to  his  management 
of  the  jewelry  trade  and  there  is  no  phase  of  the  business  in  which  he  does  not 
display  expert  knowdedge  and   workmanship. 

Fraternally  Mr.  Straub  is  connected  with  the  Elks  and  the  Eagles  but  is 
most  prominent  in  Masonic  circles,  having  passed  up  through  both  the  York 
and  Scottish  Rite  routes,  being  now  a  Knights  Templar  and  a  Consistory  Mason. 
He  believes  in  the  principles  of  the  democratic  party  and  in  191 1  represented 
his  district  in  the  state  legislature.  It  is  characteristic  of  Mr.  Straub  that  he 
ever  faces  an  issue  squarely  and  his  position  upon  any  vital  question  is  never  an 
equivocal  one.  He  believes  in  the  northwest  and  its  opportunities  and  labors 
earnestly  for  its  progress  and  at  the  same  time  the  careful  direction  of  his 
business  interests  has  brought  him  well  merited  and  deserved  prosperity. 


F.   STANLEY  PIPER. 


F.  Stanley  Piper,  a  Bellingham  architect  whose  skill  and  proficiency  are 
found  in  many  of  the  fine  business  buildings  and  residences  of  the  city  in  which 
he  lives,  was  born  in  Hull,  Yorkshire,  England,  July  7,  1883,  a  son  of  Edwin 
and  Sarah  Piper.  After  attending  a  private  school  at  Plymouth,  England,  he 
continued  his  education  in  Blundell's  College  at  Tiverton,  Devonshire,  England, 
where  he  was  graduated  on  the  completion  of  a  course  in  architecture  when 
seventeen  years  of  age.  He  then  returned  to  Plymouth,  England,  where  he 
followed  his  profession  in  connection  with  the  firm  of  King  &  Lister,  F.  R.  I. 
B.  A,,  architects,  with  whom  he  remained  until  1907.  That  year  witnessed  his 
arrival  in  America  and  he  became  a  resident  of  Seattle,  Washington,  where  he 
was  connected  with  different  architects  until  1908  when  he  came  to  Belling- 
ham and  opened  an  office,  since  which  time  he  has  continuously  and  successfully 
practiced  his  profession,  his  office  comprising  six  rooms  in  the  First  National 
Bank  building.  From  the  many  buildings  designed  in  his  offices  may  be  men- 
tioned the  Donovan  Building,  the  Grand  and  Edison  theatres,  the  Northwest 
Hardware  Building,  the  Bellingham  National  Bank  Building,  the  Zobrist  Build- 
ing, the  Bellingham  Country  Club  and  the  Kulshan  Club.  He  likewise  exe- 
cuted the  plans  for  the  residences  of  Robert  Forbes,  Dr.  A.  Macrae  Smith,  J. 
J.  Donovan,  Frank  Deming,  Daniel  Campbell,  Stuart  Deming.  James  Scott, 
Walter  Henderson  and  many  other  beautiful  residences  and  buildings  of  the 
city  and  of  Whatcom  and  Skagit  counties.     To  those  who  know  Bellingham  and 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  219 

its  fine  buildings  and  palatial  residences  no  further  comment  concerning  Mr. 
Piper's  ability  need  be  made.  He  is  familiar  with  all  scientific  laws  and  rules 
which  govern  his  profession,  thoroughly  knows  the  types  of  architecture  of  the 
old  world  and,  moreover,  in  his  work  has  shown  great  adaptability  in  meeting 
the  needs  of  the  new  world  in  construction. 

In  Boonville,  Missouri,  Mr.  Piper  was  married  to  Miss  Minnie  H.  Bell  on 
the  30th  of  April,  1913,  and  theirs  is  an  attractive  home  whose  hospitality  is 
enjoyed  by  their  many  friends.  Mr.  Piper  belongs  to  the  Bellingham  Country 
Club  and  enjoys  the  recreation  and  entertainment  which  it  affords  him  from  the 
strain  of  business.  He  is  a  communicant  of  the  Episcopal  church.  Along  pro- 
fessional lines  he  has  a  connection  that  indicates  his  ability,  being  a  member  of 
the  Washington  State  Chapter  of  the  American  Institute  of  Architects,  and  a 
member  of  the  Devon  &  Exeter  Architectural  Society  of  the  Royal  Institute  of 
British  Architects. 


ANTON  BEHME. 


Anton  Behme,  deceased,  was  for  many  years  a  prominent  resident  of  Cus- 
ter, where  he  operated  a  sawmill  for  a  long  period  and  where  he  also  owned  a 
hotel.  His  birth  occurred  in  Centerville,  New  York,  November  27,  1845,  ^^^ 
he  was  a  son  of  Henry  J.  Behme,  who  in  1847  removed  with  his  family  from 
New  York  to  the  northwestern  part  of  Ohio.  During  his  boyhood  much  of  his 
time  was  devoted  to  helping  his  father  with  the  farm  work  and  in  so  doing  he 
gained  a  thorough  knowledge  of  practical  agricultural  methods.  In  October, 
1861,  when  not  yet  sixteen  years  of  age,  he  enlisted  in  the  Union  army  as  a 
member  of  a  company  under  command  of  General  Shields  and  participated  in 
many  battles  in  Virginia  and  also  in  engagements  in  other  states.  He  was  at 
the  front  in  all  for  three  years  and  four  months,  proving  at  all  times  a  loyal  and 
gallant  soldier.  x\fter  his  honorable  discharge  from  the  army  he  returned  to 
Ohio,  where  he  engaged  in  farming  for  a  time.  He  then  went  to  Michigan 
and  for  eleven  years  resided  there,  where  he  engaged  in  the  lumber  business 
and  for  five  years  operated  a  sawmill. 

At  length  Mr.  Behme  decided  to  remove  to  the  Pacific  northwest,  which  he 
recognized  as  being  an  unusually  profitable  field  for  lumber  operations,  and 
accordingly  in  1884  removed  to  Snohomish,  Washington.  He  established  one 
of  the  first  sawmills  in  that  locality  and  operated  it  until  1891.  when  he  dis- 
posed of  his  interests  there.  In  1889  he  became  identified  with  the  lumber  busi- 
ness in  Whatcom  county  and  in  1891  on  selling  his  interests  in  Snohomish  he 
took  up  his  residence  in  Custer  and  purchased  a  sawmill,  which  he  operated 
until  it  was  burned  in  1893.  He  rebuild  at  once  and  for  a  considerable  time 
continued  his  connection  with  the  sawmill  industry.  For  some  time  he  also 
owned  and  managed  the  Custer  Hotel,  which  gained  an  enviable  reputation  for 
comfort  and  the  excellence  of  its  cuisine.  In  1903  he  was  appointed  postmaster 
and  served  in  that  capacity  for  ten  years,  or  until  his  death  on  the  28th  of  Jan- 
uary, 1913.     He  proved  a  popular  official,  being  at  once  courteous  and  efficient. 

Mr.   Behme  was  married  in   1873  to  Miss  Clara  I.   Spencer,  who  is  a  rep- 


220  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

resentative  of  an  old  New  England  family.  To  their  union  were  born  eight 
children,  of  whom  seven  survive,  namely:  Amy;  Percival  Custer;  Grace,  now 
the  wife  of  Ed  Jones;  Claude;  Bessie,  the  wife  of  Fred  Tarte;  Edna,  who 
married  Verne  Parrish ;  and  Elmer,  at  home.  All  of  the  children  reside  in 
Custer  or  its  vicinity. 

Mr.  Behme  was  a  stanch  adherent  of  the  republican  party  and  in  1900  was 
elected  county  commissioner.  He  was  quite  active  in  local  politics  and  did  much 
effective  work  in  behalf  of  his  party.  Fraternally  he  was  connected  with  both 
the  Masons  and  the  Odd  Fellows  and  his  life  exemplified  the  principles  of 
brotherhood  upon  which  those  organizations  are  founded.  He  was  highly 
esteemed  both  for  his  unquestioned  business  ability  and  for  his  unswerving 
adherence  to  high  standards  of  morality. 

Claude  Behme  was  born  in  Snohomish  in  1884  and  in  his  boyhood  and  youth 
was  a  student  in  the  Blaine  and  Custer  schools.  Subsequently  he  became  asso- 
ciated with  his  father  in  the  sawmill  business  and  still  later  he  established  a 
confectionery  store,  which  he  has  since  conducted.  Upon  his  father's  appoint- 
ment as  postmaster  he  became  assistant  and  since  the  former's  death  in  1913 
he  has  been  in  charge  of  the  office.  He  is  also  engaged  in  business  as  a  general 
merchant  and  has  gained  a  profitable  and  representative  patronage.  In  Febru- 
ary, 1916,  he  was  elected  president  of  the  Custer  State  Bank  and  is  still  serving 
in  that  office,  his  business  acumen  and  sound  judgment  well  qualifying  him 
to  direct  the  policies  of  the  institution.  On  the  12th  of  June,  1912,  he  was 
united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Bessie  Darland,  of  Portland,  Oregon,  and  they  have 
a  son,  Claude  Darland.  He  is  a  republican  in  political  belief,  and  his  attitude 
toward  his  community  is  that  of  a  public-spirited  citizen  who  recognizes  his  civic 
responsibilities. 


ROBERT  MORAN 


The  beautiful  home  of  Robert  A-Ioran  at  Rosario  is  the  expression  of  his 
own  ideas  of  architecture,  finishing  and  furnishing,  and  is  one  of  the  most 
attractive  residences  in  western  Washington.  Moreover,  it  is  the  visible  evi- 
dence of  business  success— success  achieved  as  a  prominent  shipbuilder  on  the 
Pacific  coast.  The  story  of  his  life  is  a  most  interesting  one,  as  he  came  to 
the  coast  when  eighteen  years  of  age  and  steadily  worked  his  way  upward.  He 
was  born  in  New  York  city  in  1857,  a  son  of  Edward  and  Jean  (Boyack) 
Moran.  The  mother  in  later  life  came  to  the  northwest,  spending  her  last  days 
in  Seattle. 

Robert  Moran  remained  in  the  eastern  metropolis  until  he  reached  the  age 
of  eighteen  years,  when  he  made  his  way  across  the  country  to  Seattle,  where 
for  a  time  he  was  employed  in  various  ways,  ever  carefully  utilizing  his  time 
and  his  opportunities  in  order  to  make  an  advance  step  with  the  ultimate  hope 
of  winning  for  himself  a  substantial  place  in  business  circles.  He  finally  took 
up  steamboat  and  marine  engineering,  which  he  followed  in  British  Columbia, 
in  Alaska  and  on  Puget  Sound  for  six  or  seven  years.  He  ran  boats  on  the 
Eraser  river  in  British  Columbia  and  carried  steel  used  in  the  construction  of 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  221 

the  Canadian  Pacific  Railroad.  He  took  to  Fort  Wrangel,  Alaska,  needed  sup- 
plies and  thus  became  actively  identified  with  the  development  of  that  country. 
His  labors  have  been  a  direct  influence  in  bringing  about  conditions  resulting 
in  modern  day  progress  and  prosperity.  In  the  meantime  other  members  of 
the  family  came.  There  were  eight  sons  and  two  daughters,  but  one  of  the 
daughters  has  passed  away.  Following  the  arrival  of  others  of  the  family  on 
the  Pacific  coast  in  1882,  the  firm  of  Moran  Brothers  was  established  by  Robert, 
Peter,  William  and  Paul  Moran,  at  which  time  their  combined  capital  amounted 
to  fifteen  hundred  dollars.  They  opened  a  machine  and  pipe  shop  and  a  year 
later  added  a  foundry,  which  was  situated  on  Yesler  wharf,  in  Seattle.  There 
business  was  conducted  until  1889,  when  fire  destroyed  their  plant,  in  fact 
wiping  out  a  great  portion  of  the  business  section  of  the  city.  Mr.  Moran  was 
at  that  time  serving  as  mayor  of  Seattle  and  for  one  term  previous  had  been 
a  member  of  the  city  council.  He  continued  in  the  mayoralty  for  two  terms 
and  faced  many  grave  and  important  problems  connected  with  the  rebuilding 
of  Seattle. 

Following  the  fire  the  firm  located  on  the  site  now  occupied  by  the  Seattle 
Dry  Dock  &  Construction  Company,  establishing  there  a  machine  shop  and 
foundry  and  adding  a  shipbuilding  department.  The  business  steadily  grew. 
In  fact  the  patronage  increased  rapidly  and  their  enterprise  came  to  be  one 
of  the  most  important  of  the  industrial  interests  of  the  northwest.  After  estab- 
lishing their  shipbuilding  department  their  first  contract  was  for  the  building 
of  the  fire  boat  Snoqualmie,  which  is  stillin  operation.  When  they  removed 
to  the  site  on  which  the  Seattle  Dry  Dock  &  Construction  Company  is  now 
located  the  ground  was  covered  with  water  but  the  plant  was  built  upon  piling, 
the  company  being  the  first  to  locate  on  what  is  now  known  as  the  tideflats  of 
the  city.  They  built  engines  and  pumps  to  pump  out  the  naval  dry  docks  at 
Bremerton,  these  being  the  largest  pumps  ever  built  on  the  Pacific  coast.  Con- 
tinuing their  shipbuilding,  they  built  the  Golden  Gate,  a  revenue  cutter,  which 
is  still  in  use  at  San  Francisco,  also  the  torpedo  boat  Rowan  and  the  lighthouse 
tender  Heathen,  the  army  transport  Seward  and  the  battleship  Nebraska.  In 
1897-8  they  built  twelve  Yukon  river  boats  which  were  launched  as  a  fleet  to 
St.  Michaels,  Alaska.  They  were  all  taken  to  their  destination  under  their  own 
steam,  which  was  considered  quite  a  feat  at  that  time,  and  only  one  boat  was 
lost.  The  Moran  Brothers  Company  built  large  numbers  of  sailing  vessels  and 
tugboats  in  addition  to  the  ships  of  greater  tonnage  which  went  out  from  their 
yards.  .Something  of  the  volume  of  their  business  is  indicated  in  the  fact  that 
they  employed  as  many  as  twenty-three  hundred  men  at  the  time  all  four  of 
the  brothers  continued  active  in  the  business,  Robert  Moran  personally  super- 
vising their  mammoth  interests.  They  not  only  built  but  equipped  various 
ships  which  left  their  yards  and  a  considerable  number  of  ships  were  sent  tc 
them  for  repair,  including  many  which  came  to  them  from  Lloyd's,  for  the 
firm  was  considered  thoroughly  responsible.  Robert  Moran  continued  an  active 
factor  in  the  management  and  control  of  the  business  until  1906,  when,  his 
health  having  become  impaired,  he  sold  out  and  since  that  time  has  been  actively 
identified  with  no  business  interests. 

It  was  in  1906  that  Robert  Moran  removed  to  Rosario  and  purchased  four 
thousand  acres  of  land,  which  included  Mount  Constitution.     He  then  began  the 


222  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

building  of  his  present  home,  which  was  three  years  in  construction,  and  his 
brothers  and  sister  also  have  homes  in  this  locality.  Mr.  Moran  made  the  plans 
himself  for  not  only  his  house  but  its  finishing  and  its  furnishing.  A  shop  was 
built  which  includes  a  brass  foundry  machine  shop  and  sawmill  for  sawing 
hardwood  lumber.  Thus  all  of  the  work  has  been  done  upon  the  place.  The 
house  has  teakwood  floors  and  the  interior  finish  is  mahogany.  Cascade  lake, 
a  half  mile  away,  has  been  tapped  for  power  for  furnishing  light  and  heat,  also 
for  washing  and  for  use  in  the  shop.  A  spring  on  a  mountain  two  miles  away 
furnishes  the  water  supply.  At  the  time  of  Mr.  Moran's  arrival  there  was  a 
sawmill  settlement  which  was  called  Newhall,  but  he  had  the  name  of  the  place 
changed  to  Rosario.  His  home  is  most  attractive  in  its  architecture  and  in  its 
interior  arrangement.  Not  only  was  the  house  planned  by  him  but  the  furni- 
ture was  built  after  plans  which  he  made  and  he  was  the  landscape  architect 
as  well,  laying  out  the  plans  which  have  been  carried  to  perfection  in  his 
grounds.  He  has  recently  built  a  beautiful  pleasure  yacht,  the  Sanwan,  con- 
structed of  the  finest  obtainable  timber  and  built  after  plans  which  he  made. 

In  Seattle,  in  1881,  Mr.  Moran  was  married  to  Miss  Elizabeth  Paul  and  they 
have  become  the  parents  of  five  children,  John  M.,  Frank  G.,  Nellie  M.,  Mal- 
colm E.  and  Mary  R.  In  politics  Mr.  Moran  was  a  republican  in  early  manhood 
and  was  a  delegate  to  the  Chicago  convention  which  nominated  William  How- 
ard Taft.  He  now  maintains  an  independent  course,  nor  is  he  active  in  fraternal 
orders  or  societies.  His  leisure  is  utilized  in  the  enjoyment  of  those  interests 
which  afford  him  most  pleasure  after  a  life  of  intense  activity  that  placed  him 
in  a  position  of  leadership  as  a  shipbuilder  on  the  Pacific  coast. 


JOHN  IFFLAND. 


The  memory  of  John  Iffland  is  cherished  by  all  who  knew  him  in  life — knew 
him  as  a  man  whose  word  was  as  good  as  his  bond,  who  never  violated  any  trust 
reposed  in  him  by  a  friend — and  he  had  no  foes.  His  death  was  a  shock  to  the 
citizens  of  Port  Townsend  and  a  blow  to  his  many  close  associates  in  various 
parts  of  the  state,  and  country.  Traveling  men  and  tourists  who  were  wont  to 
stop  at  his  hostelry,  the  Central  Hotel  of  Port  Townsend,  where  he  was  ever  a 
gracious  host,  shared  in  the  general  sorrow  that  the  news  of  his  demise  caused. 
He  possessed  a  genial,  jovial  disposition  and  ever  had  a  kindly  welcome  for  the 
traveler.  There  were  in  his  life  many  traits  that  endeared  him  to  those  with 
whom  he  came  in  contact  and  caused  his  memory  to  be  revered  by  all  who  knew 
him.  A  native  of  Germany,  he  was  born  in  Mecklar,  December  2,  1855,  and 
passed  away  at  Port  Townsend,  Novernber  30,  1914.  His  parents  were  also 
natives  of  Germany.  The  mother,  Mrs.  Elizabeth  (Kemmel)  Iffland,  came  to 
America  in  1892  and  for  several  years  remained  in  Port  Townsend.  While 
staying  with  her  son  in  Cleveland,  Ohio,  she  passed  away  in  1902,  having  for 
eleven  years  survived  her  husband,  who  died  in  Germany  in  1891.  In  their 
family  were  four  children. 

John  Iffland,  the  youngest,  attended  school  in  Germany  and  in  1883  came  to 
America,  spending  several  months  in  and  near  New  York  city,  where  he  followed 


JOHN  IFFLAND 


THE   NEW   YORK 
PUBLIC  LIBRARY 


ASTOK,    LENOX 
TILDEN  FOUNDATION 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  225 

any  employment  that  he  could  secure.  He  soon  tired  of  city  life,  however,  and 
went  to  work  in  the  mines  of  Pennsylvania,  but  he  felt  that  the  recompense  was 
inadequate  to  the  labor  required  and  determined  to  give  up  his  position.  When 
he  asked  for  his  pay  he  met  with  a  rebuff  and  went  away  without  securing  any 
remuneration  for  his  labor.  He  then  journeyed  to  Cleveland,  Ohio,  where  he 
again  worked  at  any  employment  that  he  could  secure.  He  afterward  went  to 
Fort  Wayne,  Indiana,  and  the  only  employment  open  to  him  there  was  in  a  broom 
factory  at  making  broom  handles.  He  spent  some  time  at  that  occupation  and 
then  followed  other  pursuits.  From  Indiana  he  removed  to  Helena,  Montana, 
where  he  was  again  employed  in  various  ways,  but  the  long,  hard  winters  and  the 
high  altitude  of  that  district  proved  detrimental  to  his  health,  and  hearing  of  the 
mild  winters  on  the  Pacific  coast,  he  made  his  way  to  Portland,  Oregon,  where 
he  became  a  waiter  in  a  restaurant.  A  few  months  later  he  went  to  Seattle, 
where  he  worked  at  any  employment  that  would  yield  him  an  honest  living.  On  a 
certain  Sunday  there  was  an  excursion  from  Seattle  to  Port  Townsend  and  he 
was  one  of  the  passengers  on  the  steamer  that  made  the  trip,  little  dreaming  when 
he  started  that  he  was  visiting  his  future  home.  However,  he  met  friends  there 
who  persuaded  him  to  remain  and  he  secured  a  position  with  a  Mr.  Doblee,  a 
baker,  with  whom  he  remained  for  several  months.  He  was  next  employed  by 
Mr.  Eisenbeis,  proprietor  of  a  cafe.  He  first  served  as  dining  room  waiter  but 
gradually  he  worked  his  way  upward  until  he  finally  took  the  management  of  the 
Central  Hotel.  This  hotel  has  become  a  famous  stopping  place  for  traveling 
men  and  tourists  and  has  at  various  times  sheltered  people  of  distinction  from 
all  parts  of  the  country.  Mr.  Iffland  made  the  hotel  very  popular  and  his  capable 
business  management  made  it  also  a  profitable  undertaking. 

Mr.  Iffland  was  an  honored  member  of  the  Improved  Order  of  Red  Men.  He 
never  aspired  to  public  office,  although  at  various  times  he  was  urged  by  his 
fellow  townsmen  to  become  a  candidate  for  mayor  or  other  high  positions.  He 
steadfastly  refused,  however,  and  concentrated  his  attention  upon  private  busi- 
ness affairs  and  the  interests  of  his  home. 

On  the  2d  of  December,  1876,  at  Sassendorf.  Germany,  Mr.  Iffland  was  mar- 
ried to  Miss  Lisette  Lentze,  a  daughter  of  Dietrich  and  Elizabeth  Lentze,  who 
were  natives  of  Germany  but  are  both  now  deceased.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Maud 
became  the  parents  of  a  son  and  six  daughters,  but  the  former  died  in  Germany 
when  but  two  years  of  age.  Of  the  daughters  Mrs.  Louise  Barthrop,  the  eldest, 
was  born  in  Sassendorf  in  December,  1878,  and  was  graduated  from  the  Port 
Townsend  high  school  and  from  the  University  of  Washington.  Subsequently 
she  engaged  in  teaching  school  in  Port  Townsend  for  nine  years.  She  married 
Charles  Barthrop  and  they  have  become  the  parents  of  three  children :  John, 
Emma  Louise  and  Lisette.  Jennie,  born  in  Bochum,  Germany,  in  1881,  was 
graduated  from  the  Port  Townsend  schools  and  the  L^niversity  of  Washington 
and  is  the  wife  of  Winslow  M.  McCurdy,  editor  and  proprietor  of  the  Port 
Townsend  Leader.  Freda,  born  in  Cleveland,  Ohio,  in  1883,  is  a  graduate  of 
the  University  of  Washington.  She  taught  for  a  time  in  the  high  school  of 
Olympia  and  is  now  in  the  office  of  the  state  superintendent  of  education  and 
the  board  of  examiners  in  the  capital  city.  Nellie,  born  in  Port  Townsend  in  1888, 
is  a  graduate  of  the  high  school  and  was  a  teacher  in  the  city  schools,  after  which 
she  became  a  candidate  for  the  position  of  county  superintendent  of  education 


Vol.  11—12 


226  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

on  the  republican  ticket.  Katherine,  born  in  Port  Townsend  in  1891,  is  now  a 
teacher  in  the  city  schools  of  Bremerton.  Ruby,  born  in  1893,  and  a  graduate  of 
the  city  schools,  afterward  became  a  trained  nurse  and  while  serving  profession- 
ally at  the  Jubilee  Hospital  in  Victoria,  British  Columbia,  she  was  married  to 
Jack  Turner,  who  is  the  owner  of  valuable  gold  mines  near  Dawson  in  Yukon 
territory.    She  has  two  children,  Nell  Elizabeth  and  Thomas  Elwood. 

Mr.  Iffland  came  to  America  alone,  leaving  his  family  in  Germany  until  he 
was  able  to  master  the  customs  and  language  of  the  people  of  this  country  to  a 
sufficient  extent  to  enable  him  to  make  his  way.  He  studied  at  night  and  worked 
his  way  up  gradually  until  at  the  time  of  his  death  he  was  the  owner  of  much 
valuable  property  and  of  one  of  the  finest  homes  in  Port  Townsend.  He  was  a 
loving  husband  and  a  kind  and  devoted  father  and  found  his  greatest  happiness  in 
providing  for  the  welfare  of  his  family,  whom  he  left  in  very  comfortable  cir- 
cumstances. The  salient  traits  of  his  character  were  such  as  won  for  him  the 
highest  regard  and  goodwill  of  all  and  the  news  of  his  demise  brought  a  sense  of 
personal  bereavement  into  the  homes  of  Port  Townsend  and  wherever  he  was 
known. 


ASAHEL  HOLMES  DENMAN. 

Asahel  Holmes  Denman,  member  of  the  Tacoma  bar,  w-as  born  in  Sing  Sing, 
New  York,  November  29,  1859.  His  father,  Augustus  N.  Denman,  engaged  in 
the  banking  business  in  New  York  but  afterward  removed  to  Des  Moines,  Iowa, 
to  take  charge  of  the  afifairs  of  the  Charter  Oak  Life  Insurance  Company  and 
later  was  for  many  years  secretary  of  the  Des  Moines  Waterworks  Company. 
He  wedded  Mary  Holmes,  a  daughter  of  the  Rev.  David  Holmes,  a  Methodist 
minister  of  the  New  York  conference.  Both  Mr.  and  Mrs.  A.  N.  Denman  were 
liberal  supporters  and  active  workers  of  the  Methodist  churches  in  their  places 
of  residence  throughout  their  entire  lives.  In  politics  Mr.  Denman  was  a  life- 
long republican,  his  first  vote  being  given  for  John  C.  Fremont  for  president 
of  the  United  States. 

The  boyhood  residence  of  Asahel  Holmes  Denman  was  in  New  York  city 
and  he  attended  public  school  No.  59  on  Twentieth  street.  In  1878  he  accom- 
panied his  parents  on  their  removal  to  Des  Moines,  Iowa,  and  the  following 
year  prepared  for  college  at  Evanston,  Illinois.  He  then  entered  the  North- 
western L^niversity  and  was  graduated  in  1883,  winning  the  degree  of  Bachelor 
of  Philosophy.  After  one  year  of  study  in  the  law  office  of  Wright,  Cummings 
&  Wright  at  Des  Moines,  Iowa,  he  passed  the  examinations  entitling  him  to 
enter  the  senior  class  of  the  law  school  of  the  State  University  of  Iowa,  which, 
upon  his  graduation  in  June,  1885,  conferred  upon  him  the  LL.  B.  degree.  At 
the  same  time  he  was  admitted  to  practice  law  in  the  state  and  federal  courts 
of  Iowa.  Removing  to  Kansas  City,  Missouri,  he  there  remained  from  the 
spring  of  1889  until  October,  1890,  when  he  came  to  Tacoma  as  attorney  for  the 
Lombard  Investment  Company,  and  in  April,  T891,  he  was  admitted  to  prac- 
tice law  in  Washington.  In  August,  1892,  he  removed  to  Seattle  to  do  similar 
work   for  the   Northwestern   &   Pacific   Hypotheek   Bank   and   remained   there 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  227 

until  November,  1894,  when  he  returned  to  enter  the  employ  of  O.  G.  Ellis,  now 
one  of  the  justices  of  the  supreme  court  of  the  state  of  Washington  and  then 
occupied  with  the  affairs  of  the  bankrupt  Lombard  Investment  Company.  He 
remained  with  Mr.  Ellis  in  Tacoma  until  the  spring  of  1899,  since  which  time 
he  has  been  engaged  in  general  law  practice.  In  1909  he  formed  a  partnership 
with  George  P.  Fishburne,  which  relation  continued  until  Mr.  Fishburne  be- 
came assistant  United  States  district  attorney  in  1914.  Since  then  Mr.  Denman 
has  practiced  independently  and  is  accorded  a  prominent  position  at  the  bar. 

In  politics,  when  in  Iowa,  Mr.  Denman  was  a  republican  and  an  earnest 
worker  for  the  success  of  his  party.  He  cast  his  presidential  ballot  for  Blaine 
in  1884  and  voted  twice  for  Benjamin  Harrison.  In  1891,  after  his  arrival  in 
Washington,  he  voted  with  the  democrats  on  state  and  city  issues  and  in  national 
politics,  on  account  of  the  silver  issue,  voted  for  Bryan  in  1896.  Since  then, 
on  account  of  issues  arising  in  national  politics,  he  has  voted  the  democratic 
ticket  at  state  and  national  elections.  He  has  never  held  nor  desired  public 
office  save  that  he  served  as  justice  of  the  peace  for  a  short  term  before  leaving 
Iowa. 

In  former  years  Mr.  Denman  was  active  in  the  work  of  the  Methodist  church 
and  of  the  Young  Men's  Christian  Association.  In  1909  he  joined  the  Tacoma 
Commercial  Club  and  in  191 1  served  on  its  board  of  trustees  under  the  presi- 
dency of  D.  I.  Cornell.  He  became  a  charter  member  of  the  Seattle-Tacoma 
Rainier  National  Park  Committee  and  has  been  most  active  in  its  work.  He 
was  one  of  the  organizers  and  is  an  active  member  of  the  Tacoma  Chapter  of 
the  Mountaineers  Club  and  is  an  enthusiast  concerning  Mount  Tacoma.  For 
many  years  past  he  has  lectured  before  visiting  delegations  and  Tacoma  audi- 
ences, exhibiting  a  rare  collection  of  lantern  slides  which  have  been  collected  by 
him  and  other  mountain-climbing  photographers.  This  work  has  been  a  force 
fully  appreciated  and  recognized  by  Tacoma  people  and  the  press  of  the  city, 
leading  up  to  the  present  great  interest  in  and  development  of  the  National  Park, 
resulting  in  awakening  in  many  people  an  appreciation  of  their  privileges  fol- 
lowed by  an  undertaking  to  lead  a  wholesome  outdoor  life  amid  such  surround- 
ings as  few  other  localities  on  the  face  of  the  earth  can  offer. 

Mr.  Denman  has  delivered  many  interesting  addresses  upon  the  history  of 
Mount  Tacoma  and  the  origin  of  its  name.  He  contends  that  the  word  "Tacoma" 
or  "Tahoma"  is  of  undoubted  Indian  origin,  used  by  the  Klickitats,  Yakimas  and 
Clallams  as  a  generic  term  applied  to  all  snow  peaks.  Naturally  they  called  the 
great  snow-capped  mountain  in  this  vicinity  Tahoma  or  Tacoma,  exactly  as  we 
say  "The  Mountain."  This  was  the  Tahoma  of  all  the  Tahomas.  No  one  can 
dispute  this  fact  without  disregarding  the  direct  testimony  not  only  of  Theodore 
Winthrop  but  of  Hazard  Stevens  and  P.  B.  Van  Trump,  who  tell  us  expressly 
that  their  Indian  guide,  Sluiskin.  knew  the  mountain  by  no  other  name  than 
Tak-homa  or  Tahoma.  Further  evidence  is  the  undisputed  fact  that  there  was 
a  gunboat  in  the  United  States  navy,  launched  in  the  '40s  prior  to  Winthrop's 
visit  to  the  Sound,  named  The  Tahoma,  all  as  shown  in  the  notes  of  John  H. 
Williams  to  a  late  edition  of  Winthrop's  book.  Winthrop  was  an  accurate 
writer.  He  expressed  accurately  many  beautiful  and  noble  phases  of  nature 
which  only  a  man  of  his  poetic  and  artistic  temperament  could  express.  At  the 
same  time  he  is  essentially  truthful  and  accurate  in  all  his  statements  of  facts. 


228  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

Wiiithrop  never  saw  his  book  "Canoe  and  Saddle"  in  print.  He  laid  down  his 
life  in  the  forefront  of  battle  in  1862  early  in  the  Civil  war.  It  is  too  bad  that 
any  jealousy  of  cities,  with  which  Winthrop  had  nothing  whatever  to  do,  aris- 
ing over  the  name  of  the  mountain  many  years  after  his  death,  should  cloud 
the  enjoyment  of  any  one  in  such  a  delightful  book  as  "Canoe  and  Saddle"  and 
in  the  honor  and  appreciation  that  cluster  about  a  career  of  such  promise  given 
up  for  his  country.  Mr.  Denman's  interest  in  all  phases  of  outdoor  life  has 
made  him  an  enthusiastic  advocate  of  the  wonderful  riches  nature  has  bestowed 
upon  this  section  of  the  state  in  its  scenes  of  beauty  and  grandeur,  and  his  work 
shall  live  for  all  time  to  come  in  the  newly  established  National  Park. 


FREDERICK  ARCHIBALD  HAZELTINE. 

Frederick  Archibald  Hazeltine,  owner  and  editor  of  the  South  Bend  Journal. 
has  since  the  completion  of  his  college  course  been  identified  with  journalistic 
interests  and  even  before  that  time  had  experience  along  that  line  as  editor  of 
a  college  paper.  His  life  work  has  taken  him  into  various  sections  not  only  of 
North  America  but  of  South  America  as  well.  He  was  bom  in  Warren,  Penn- 
sylvania, on  the  20th  of  October,  1867.  a  son  of  Ezra  T.  and  Rachel  (Knapp) 
Hazeltine,  both  of  Busti.  New  York.  He  comes  of  Puritan  and  Welsh  stock. 
His  father  was  for  many  years  the  manager  and  one  of  the  main  owners  of 
the  cough  medicine  called  Piso's  Cure  for  Consumption,  from  which  he  derived 
a  large  income  that,  however,  he  gave  away  to  Young  Men's  Christian  Associa- 
tions, foreign  missions  and  other  lines  of  religious  work  as  he  made  it.  He  thus 
died  a  poor  man,  which  he  had  previously  planned  to  do,  considering  it  a  dis- 
grace to  die  rich. 

Liberal  educational  opportunities  were  accorded  Frederick  A.  Hazeltine,  who 
in  1889  ^^'^s  graduated  from  Oberlin  College  of  Oberlin,  Ohio,  with  the  Bachelor 
of  Arts  degree.  As  previously  stated,  he  had  formerly  been  editor  of  the  college 
paper,  the  Oberlin  Review,  and  immediately  after  his  graduation  he  traveled  for 
a  year  in  South  America  as  newspaper  correspondent  and  afterward  published 
a  book  entitled.  "A  Year  of  South  American  Travel."  His  identification  with 
journalism  in  the  northwest  began  in  the  winter  of  1890-91.  when  he  served 
as  a  member  of  the  stafit  of  the  Spokane  (Wash.)  Chronicle.  After  eighteen 
years  he  succeeded  his  old  paymaster  on  the  Chronicle  as  president  of  the  Wash- 
ington State  Press  Association.  In  July,  1891,  he  began  newspaper  publishing 
on  his  own  account  by  purchasing  an  interest  in  the  Journal,  of  South  Bend, 
Washington,  at  which  time  the  paper  and  the  town  were  but  a  year  old.  He  at 
once  assumed  editorial  and  business  control  and  eventually  became  sole  owner. 
He  still  continues  the  publication  of  this  paper,  which  he  has  ever  made  the 
advocate  of  the  rights  of  the  people,  of  public  progress,  of  reform  and  improve- 
ment. He  is  also  the  president  of  the  Willapa  Power  Company  and  he  is  the 
owner  of  extensive  landed  interests  in  Pacific  county.  Washington.  This  point, 
however,  was  not  reached  without  much  effort.  When  he  went  to  South  Bend 
he  stood  for  law  and  order,  for  decency  and  right,  and  he  had  to  battle  with  the 
crime,  vice  and  lawlessness  which  are  so   frequently  characteristic   features  of 


.  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  229 

a  new  western  town.  In  his  vocabulary  there  is  no  such  word  as  fail  and  he 
persevered  until  triumph  rewarded  his  efforts,  resulting  in  a  riddance  to  the  town 
of  most  of  its  undesirable  elements  and  resulting  as  well  in  the  establishment 
of  his  own  business  upon  a  profitable  basis  in  which  he  received  the  support  of 
the  better  class  of  citizens. 

It  was  while  upon  one  of  his  South  American  trips  that  Mr.  Hazeltine,  on 
shipboard,  met  the  lady  whom  he  afterward  wedded — Miss  Amy  Wood,  who 
was  born  in  Rosario,  in  the  Argentine  republic,  where  her  father,  the  Rev.  Dr. 
T.  B.  Wood,  was  United  States  consul  and  for  forty  years  a  leader  in  mission 
work  in  South  America,  widely  known  as  an  orator  and  diplomat.  Before  going 
to  the  southern  continent  he  was  at  the  head  of  Valparaiso  College  in  Indiana. 
It  was  in  Callao,  Peru,  on  the  30th  of  May,  1895,  that  the  marriage  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Hazeltine  was  celebrated.  The  legality,  however,  was  contested  because  the 
ceremony  was  performed  by  a  Protestant  minister.  Peru  was  entirely  a  Catholic 
country  and  no  Catholic  priest  would  perform  a  marriage  ceremony  for 
Protestants.  Dr.  W'ood  took  up  the  matter  to  the  courts,  his  efforts  resulting 
in  the  passage  of  a-  law  confirming  the  legality  of  the  marriage,  and  this  con- 
stituted the  entering  wedge  for  religious  liberty  in  Peru.  Mrs.  Hazeltine  greatly 
assisted  her  father  in  the  work  in  the  mission  schools  prior  to  her  marriage  and 
she  has  taken  an  active  part  in  club  and  religious  work  in  Washington,  serving 
as  secretary  of  the  Washington  State  Federation  of  Women's  Clubs  in  1913.  By 
her  marriage  she  has  become  the  mother  of  four  children :  Lelia,  Ezra,  Ellen 
and  Amy  Caroline. 

Both  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hazeltine  have  been  members  of  the  South  Bend  Metho- 
dist Episcopal  church  for  many  years.  In  fact  he  has  been  identified  with  the 
church  as  trustee  and  steward  for  a  quarter  of  a  century  or  almost  since  its 
foundation.  He  has  been  class  leader  for  several  years  and  also  Sunday  school 
superintendent.  He  reorganized  and  was  president  of  the  Laymen's  Associa- 
tion of  the  Puget  Sound  Conference  from  1913  until  191 5  inclusive,  and  he  headed 
the  lay  delegations  to  the  Methodist  General  Conferences  of  1908  and  1916. 
Fraternally  Mr.  Hazeltine  is  a  Mason.  In  politics  he  is  a  liberal  republican  and 
has  always  been  a  strong  prohibitionist.  He  was  one  of  the  pioneers  in  prohibi- 
tion work  in  the  state,  although  his  county  was  originally  strongly  wet.  However, 
the  efforts  of  Mr.  Hazeltine  and  others  resulted  in  influencing  public  opinion  to 
such  an  extent  that  Pacific  county  became  one  of  the  first  counties  in  the  state  to 
vote  dry  under  local  option,  and  he  was  a  member  of  the  state  committee  which 
drafted  and  put  through  the  direct  primary  law  and  later  the  initiative  and 
referendum.  It  was  largely  his  efforts  that  resulted  in  the  building  of  the 
South  Bend  Commercial  Club,  of  which  he  has  been  trustee  and  treasurer  since 
the  incorporation  of  the  organization.  In  1897  he  was  county  treasurer  and 
declined  a  reelection,  though  offered  the  nomination  by  the  republican,  demo- 
cratic and  populist  parties.  He  was  treasurer  of  South  Bend  in  1898  and  1899. 
In  1908  he  was  appointed  regent  of  the  Washington  State  University  by  Governor 
Mead  and  served  in  that  capacity  under  five  governors,  resigning  in  19 15.  He 
was  president  of  the  university  board  of  regents  for  two  terms,  an  honor  rarely 
bestowed.  He  acted  as  chairman  of  the  Pacific  county  republican  central  com- 
mittee in  1902  and  1903  and  was  a  member  of  the  rejiublican  state  central 
committee  in  1904  and  1905.     He  was  president  of  the  Oberlin  College  Alumni 


230  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

Association  of  Puget  Sound  for  1910  and  191 1,  and  is  a  member  of  the  advisory 
committee  on  education  for  Oberlin  College.  There  is  no  question  of  public 
moment  which  does  not  awaken  his  interest  and  his  position  is  never  an  equivocal 
one,  for  he  stands  fearlessly  on  the  side  of  right.  In  fact  he  is  known  as  one 
who  will  ever  battle  for  his  opinions  and  his  ideals.  He  has  lectured  extensively 
on  South  America,  having  traveled  largely  in  Mexico,  Central  and  South  America. 
He  is  one  of  whom  it  may  be  truthfully  said  that  he  has  never  lost  the  common 
touch.  Success  and  growing  power  have  not  dulled  his  perceptions  of  what  is 
right  and  he  is  a  fearless  supporter  of  any  cause  in  which  he  believes.  In  busi- 
ness he  is  the  personification  of  high  standards  and  rigid  integrity:,  in  social  inter- 
course is  genial,  kindly  and  humanly  sympathetic. 


SOUTH  BEND  JOURNAL. 

The  South  Bend  Journal,  one  of  the  leading  papers  of  the  Willapa  Harbor 
district,  was  established  in  February,  1890,  by  Captain  William  F.  Wallace  as  a 
weekly  paper.  In  July,  1891,  the  paper  was  purchased  by  F.  A.  Hazeltine,  who 
has  since  conducted  it.  At  that  time  the  circulation  numbered  three  hundred, 
and  something  of  the  development  of  the  business  is  indicated  in  the  fact  that 
there  are  now  nineteen  hundred  and  fifty  names  on  the  paid  subscription  list. 
The  office  is  equipped  with  a  power  plant  and  all  modern  machinery  for  carry- 
ing on  the  printing  business,  and  the  South  Bend  Journal  is  an  interesting  sheet, 
well  edited  and  also  carefully  published  when  considered  from  the  standpoint  of 
the  mechanical  work  of  the  printing  office. 

Mr.  Hazeltine  came  to  Washington  in  1890  and  through  the  intervening  years 
has  been  continuously  connected  with  newspaper  publication.  He  removed  to 
the  west  from  Warren,  Pennsylvania,  the  place  of  his  nativity,  and  made  his  way 
first  to  Spokane,  where  he  became  connected  with  the  stafif  of  the  Spokane 
Chronicle.  Soon  afterward  he  removed  to  South  Bend  and  is  now  in  control 
of  the  oldest  paper  on  Willapa  harbor. 


NOAH  B.  COFFMAN. 


Noah  B.  CofTman,  president  of  Cofifman,  Dobson  &  Company,  bankers,  of 
Chehalis,  is  one  of  the  foremost  bankers  of  Western  Washington  and  for  a  third 
of  a  century  has  been  prominently  identified  with  the  business  interests  of  this 
section  of  the  state.  He  was  born  near  Crawfordsville,  Indiana,  April  2,  1857, 
and  is  a  son  of  N.  B.  and  Margaret  Cofifman,  the  former  a  native  of  Virginia 
and  the  latter  of  Carroll,  Ohio.  In  the  spring  of  1858  the  family  located  on  a 
farm  in  Champaign  county,  Illinois,  and  they  resided  in  that  county  for  many 
years.  The  father  joined  his  son  Noah  in  Hebron,  Nebraska,  in  1881,  and  fol- 
lowed farming  in  that  locality  until  1885.  Three  years  later  he  and  his  wife 
came  to  Chehalis,  Washington,  where  our  subject  was  then  living,  as  he  had 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  231 

come  to  this  state  in  1S83  and  after  living  for  a  year  in  Tacoma  became  a  resi- 
dent of  Chehalis  in  1884,  opening  a  private  bank  there  August  nth  of  that  year. 

Mr.  Coffman  of  this  review  is  a  graduate  of  the  University  of  lUinois,  being 
a  member  of  the  class  of  1878,  and  after  leaving  that  institution  studied  law 
under  the  direction  of  William  Summers  of  Urbana,  Illinois,  who  was  an  asso- 
ciate of  Abraham  Lincoln  and  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Summers  &  Wright,  his 
partner  being  Judge  Wright,  now  judge  of  the  circuit  court  of  Illinois.  Mr. 
Coffman  was  admitted  to  the  bar  in  1880  at  Wellington,  Kansas,  having  previ- 
ously been  connected  with  Judge  Woods  of  that  city,  and  he  began  practice  at 
Ottawa,  Kansas.  Like  most  young  lawyers  he  had  a  hard  struggle  and  had  to 
augment  his  income  by  teaching  school  in  Hebron,  Nebraska,  for  a  time.  Later 
he  was  persuaded  to  accept  the  position  of  clerk  in  the  Exchange  Bank  of 
Hebron  and  was  soon  promoted  to  cashier,  continuing  with  that  institution  for 
over  two  years.  He  then  formed  a  law  partnership  with  Manford  Savage,  who 
had  been  a  classmate  of  his  at  college,  and  they  soon  built  up  an  extensive  prac- 
tice in  commercial  law,  but  Mr.  Coffman  was  again  induced  to  enter  the  Ex- 
change Bank  as  cashier  with  an  interest  in  the  business  and  he  served  as  such 
until  coming  to  Washington  in  1883. 

His  friend,  Thomas  Harbime,  of  Fairbury,  Nebraska,  had  visited  the  Puget 
Sound  country  and  had  persuaded  Mr.  Coffman  and  some  of  his  associates  to 
locate  here.  It  was  agreed  that  our  subject  should  be  their  delegate  to  choose 
a  location,  purchase  property  and  attend  to  all  necessary  preliminaries.  He 
arrived  in  Tacoma  in  May,  1883,  and  after  looking  over  the  field  purchased  the 
southwest  corner  of  Pacific  avenue  and  Eleventh  street,  Tacoma,  for  a  bank  site. 
He  and  his  associate  bought  into  the  Bank  of  New  Tacoma,  of  which  he  was 
made  cashier.  This  bank  was  later  merged  into  the  Merchants  National  Bank. 
In  1884  Mr.  Coffman  sold  his  interest  in  the  concern  and  removed  to  Chehalis, 
where  he  started  a  private  bank  in  connection  with  C.  H.  Allen,  having  since 
carried  on  business  at  the  same  location.  Later  he  organized  the  First  National 
Bank  of  Chehalis,  taking  as  associates  John  Dobson,  Francis  Donahoe,  Wil- 
liam M.  Urquhart  and  Daniel  C.  Millett.  After  a  time  the  company  dropped 
the  national  organization,  believing  that  a  private  bank  was  more  adapted  to  the 
needs  of  the  country,  and  they  have  since  carried  on  business  under  the  present 
title  of  Coffman,  Dobson  &  Company,  Bankers.  The  bank  was  incorporated  in 
1904.  Mr.  Coffman's  son  Daniel  T.  is  now  cashier  and  his  son-in-law,  J.  M. 
Donahoe,  is  vice  president.  Mr.  Coffman  still  continues  at  the  head  of  the  insti- 
tution. 

On  the  30th  of  October,  1883,  he  was  married  in  Belvidere,  Nebraska,  to 
Miss  Adaline  J.  Tighe,  a  daughter  of  Daniel  and  Jane  A.  Tighe.  Her  father 
was  a  machinist  and  mill  man.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Coffman  have  three  children. 
Florence  A.  is  now  the  wife  of  T.  M.  Donahoe,  vice  president  of  the  bank  and 
a  farmer  of  Lewis  county.  Ethelin  M.  is  the  wife  of  R.  W.  Bell,  president  of 
the  Toledo  State  Bank  at  Toledo,  Washington.  Daniel  T.  is  cashier  of  the 
bank  of  Coffman,  Dobson  &  Company,  Bankers.  The  family  home  is  on  St. 
Helen's  avenue. 

Mr.  Coffman  has  devoted  much  time  to  the  breeding  of  pure  bred  Jersey 
cattle  and  is  president  of  the  Lewis  County  Pure  Breeders  Club.  He  is  a  broad- 
minded  and  progressive  man  whose  interests  have  been  varied  and  he  has  pro- 


232  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

moted  many  worthy  enterprises  which  he  beheved  would  advance  the  public 
welfare.  He  assisted  in  platting  the  town  of  Chehalis  and  has  borne  an  impor- 
tant part  in  its  development.  He  is  a  charter  member  of  the  Citizens  Club  and 
is  a  Knight  Templar  IMason.  He  is  senior  warden  of  the  Episcopal  church,  to 
which  he  belongs,  and  is  treasurer  of  the  diocese  of  western  Washington.  For 
the  past  twenty  years  he  has  been  a  representative  to  the  national  conventions 
of  his  church.  Politically  Mr.  Cofifman  has  been  a  lifelong  republican,  has  been 
active  in  the  selection  of  good  men  for  office  and  was  a  delegate  to  the  national 
convention  of  his  patr}'  held  in  Philadelphia  in  1904,  which  nominated  Major 
McKinley  for  president  and  was  chosen  a  member  of  the  committee  to  notify 
Mr.  jMcKinley  of  his  nomination.  In  1916  he  was  a  delegate  to  the  national 
republican  convention  at  Chicago.  Mrs.  Coffman  is  prominently  connected  with 
the  social  and  religious  interests  of  the  city,  having  served  as  president  of  the  St. 
Helen's  Club  for  many  years  and  taken  an  active  part  in  church  work  not  only 
locally  but  also  in  the  missionary  department  of  the  Episcopal  church. 


SIDNEY  :\IOOR  HEATH. 

The  position  of  Sidney  Moor  Heath  as  an  able  member  of  the  Hoquiam  bar 
is  certainly  indicated  in  the  fact  that  he  has  four  times  been  recalled  to  the  office 
of  city  attorney  during  the  last  twenty-two  years  and  for  the  past  three  years  has 
served  continuously  in  that  position.  The  width  of  the  continent  separates  him 
from  his  birthplace,  for  he  is  a  native  of  Waterville,  Maine,  born  on  the  27th  of 
August,  1859.  His  father,  William  S.  Heath,  who  w^as  born  in  Maine,  March  13, 
1834,  was  a  son  of  Solyman  Heath  and  a  grandson  of  Caleb  Heath.  Solyman 
Heath  practiced  law  first  in  Belfast,  ^Maine,  and  later  in  \\'aterville,.  Maine,  for 
more  than  forty  years.  During  this  period  he  held  the  office  of  probate  judge 
of  Waldo  county,  and  also  reporter  of  the  Alaine  supreme  court  decisions  for 
some  years.  He  also  represented  Waterville  in  the  state  legislature  and  for 
many  years  was  president  of  the  Ticonic  National  Bank  of  Waterville.  He  took 
a  leading  part  in  the  organization  of  the  Ticonic  Water  Power  and  ^Manufacturing 
Company,  from  the  growth  of  which  Waterville  has  become  one  of  the  largest 
manufacturing  centers  of  Maine.  William  S.  Heath,  father  of  our  subject, 
practiced  law  from  the  time  of  his  graduation  from  college  until  the  breaking 
out  of  the  Civil  war,  at  which  time  he  returned  to  Water\'ille  and  went  to  the 
front  as  captain  of  Company  H  of  the  Third  Maine  Regiment.  He  rose  to  the 
rank  of  lieutenant  colonel  of  the  Fifth  Maine  Infantry  Regiment  and  was  killed 
at  the  battle  of  Gaines  Mills,  Mrginia,  while  serving  in  such  capacity,  June 
2^,  1862. 

His  wife,  mother  of  Sidney  Moor  Heath,  bore  the  maiden  name  of  Maria 
E.  Moor,  and  was  a  daughter  of  Wyman  B.  S.  Moor,  of  Waterville,  Maine,  one 
of  the  leading  lawyers  of  the  state,  a  graduate  of  Waterville  College,  now  Colby 
College,  and  a  student  at  Dane  Law  School,  of  Cambridge,  Massachusetts.  He 
was  elected  to  represent  his  town  in  the  state  legislature,  and  from  1844  to  1848 
was  attorney  general  of  Maine.     Between  1852  and  1858  he  turned  his  attention 


SIDNEY  M.  HEATH 


^<.v 


<^^ 


^^ 


.<^ 


oV°" 


><^ 


^-^^  4" 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  235 

to  constructive  work  and  as  superintendent  he  constructed  a  railroad  from 
Waterville  to  Bangor.  At  one  time  he  was  United  States  senator  from  Maine, 
and  at  another  time  was  consul  general  to  the  British  provinces.  His  grand- 
father was  Captain  Daniel  Moor,  who  served  as  a  captain  under  General  Stark 
in  the  Revolutionary  war,  and  he  was  a  son  of  Deacon  James  Moore,  who  came 
to  America  in  1723  from  Tyrone  county,  Ireland.  Asa  Redington,  the  father  of 
Sidney  Moor  Heath's  grandmother,  Mrs.  Emily  (Redington)  Heath,  was  a 
corporal  in  Washington's  Life  Guard  and  on  the  close  of  the  Revolutionary  war 
returned  with  his  musket  from  West  Point,  where  he  was  mustered  out,  back  to 
his  home  at  Wilton,  New  Hampshire.  He  had  but  lately  been  discharged  from 
the  hospital  and,  too  feeble  to  carry  his  musket,  he  hired  a  man  to  carry  it  for 
him,  agreeing  to  pay  him  a  "hard"  dollar,  for  which  he  had  to  work  eight  days 
in  order  to  redeem  the  musket.  These  facts  were  made  the  subject  of  a  poem  by 
William  S.  Heath  which  after  his  death  was  set  to  music  and  dedicated  to  Major 
General  George  B.  McClellan.    The  poem  is  as  follows: 

THE    corporal's    MUSKET. 

Take  down  the  Corporal's  musket — my  grandsire  brought  it  back 
From  Yorktown,  in  the  winter,  on  a  long  and  weary  track ; 
Tho'  the  bivouac  was  over,  and  the  march  and  fight  were  done, 
Thro'  the  mire  and  snow  he  bore  it.  for  the  soldier  loved  his  gun. 
And  he 'hung  it  by  his  fireside,  'mid  the  branching  pines  of  Maine — 
Take  down  the  Corporal's  musket — we  need  it  once  again. 

The  rust  has  slowly  settled,  in  the  years  that  since  have  flown, 

Upon  the  good  old  barrel  that  once  like  silver  shone ; 

It  has  a  quaint  and  war-worn  look — the  fashion  of  the  stock, 

Perhaps,  is  only  equaled  by  the  fashion  of  the  lock ; 

But  slumb'ring  sparks  of  seventy-six,  within  the  flint  remain — 

Take  down  the  Corporal's  musket — we  need  it  once  again. 

The  veteran  who  bore  it,  with  the  soldier's  measured  tread, 

Awaiting  the  great  reveille,  is  mustered  with  the  dead ; 

But  above  the  din  of  battle,  upon  this  field  of  yore. 

His  voice  in  martial  cadence  calls  "to  arms !  to  arms !"  once  more. 

And  in  this  dread  and  fearful  strife  that  call  is  not  in  vain — 

Take  down  the  Corporal's  musket — we  need  it  once  again. 

To  thee  and  me,  my  brother,  comes  down  the  soldier's  gun ; 
It  tells  a  tale  of  mighty  deeds,  by  patriot  valor  done; 
The  hurried  march,  the  daring  charge,  the  onset  and  the  strife 
Of  clashing  steel,  of  bursting  shell — the  stake  a  Nation's  life ; 
Then  seize  once  more  that  well-tried  gun,  which  idle  long  has  lain, 
Quick — seize  the  Corporal's  musket — 'twill  help  us  once  again ! 

In  the  maternal  line  the  ancestry  of  Sidney  Moor  Heath  is  traced  back  to  a 
remote  period  in  the  colonial  history  of  the  country,  the  ancestry  being  traced 


236  WASHINGTOX,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

back  to  Francis  Cook,  who  was  the  seventeenth  signer  of  the  Mayflower  Com- 
pact, having  come  over  with  the  Pilgrims.  His  son,  Jacob  Cook,  married  Damarie 
Hopkins,  a  daughter  of  Stephen  Hopkins,  who  also  came  over  in  the  Mayflower 
and  was  the  nineteenth  signer  of  the  ^Mayflower  Compact  and  is  regarded  as  one 
of  the  historical  founders  of  Plymouth  Plantation.  Jacob  Cook  and  Damarie 
Hopkins  were  also  passengers  on  the  historic  Mayflower,  being  brought  to  the 
new  world  by  their  parents.  The  line  of  descent  is  traced  down  through  Charles, 
Josiah  and  Daniel  Cook  to  Clara  A.  N.  Cook,  who  became  the  wife  of  Wyman 
B.  S.  Moor  and  was  the  grandmother  of  Sidney  Moor  Heath  in  the  maternal  line. 
Their  family  included  Maria  Elizabeth  Moor,  who  was  born  in  1839,  and  in  1856 
became  the  wife  of  Lieutenant  Colonel  William  S.  Heath ;  she  survived  her  hus- 
band for  only  a  brief  period,  passing  away  June  20,  1863. 

Sidney  Moor  Heath  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  and  in  the  Coburn 
Classical  Institute  at  Waterville,  in  which  he  completed  his  more  specifically 
literary  course.  He  then  entered  upon  preparation  for  a  professional  career  and 
was  graduated  from  the  law  department  of  the  Boston  University  with  the  degree 
of  Bachelor  of  Law  in  1880.  In  that  year  he  removed  to  the  west  and  was 
admitted  to  practice  before  the  supreme  court  of  Colorado.  He  opened  a  law 
office  in  Denver  in  the  same  year  but  within  a  year  or  two  returned  to  his  native 
city  and  was  admitted  to  practice  in  the  supreme  court  of  Maine  in  1882.  He 
opened  an  office  in  Waterville,  where  he  remained  until  the  fall  of  1890,  when 
-le  came  to  Washington  and  has  since  been  an  active  representative  of  the  bar 
of  Hoquiam,  accorded  a  practice  of  distinctively  representative  character  and  of 
gratifying  proportions. 

Mr.  Heath  has  always  given  his  political  allegiance  to  the  republican  party  and 
of  late  years  has  affiliated  with  the  progressive  wing  of  that  organization.  The 
offices  which  he  has  held  have  largely  been  in  the  path  of  his  profession.  Between 
1882  and  1890  he  held  the  office  of  city  clerk  of  Waterville  for  five  years.  In 
1894  he  was  elected  a  member  of  the  state  legislature  of  Washington  from 
Chehalis  county,  now  Grays  Harbor  county,  and  in  1895  ^^  ^^^^  appointed  a 
member  of  the  tide  and  shore  lands  commission  and  as  such  laid  out  the  tide 
and  shore  lands  of  Chehalis  county,  now  Grays  Harbor  county.  He  was  prose- 
f:uting  attorney  of  Chehalis  county  for  the  years  1903  and  1904  and  at  intervals 
ne  has  held  the  office  of  city  attorney  of  Hoquiam,  being  the  present  incumbent 
in  that  position,  his  service  during  this  last  incumbency  covering  three  years. 

On  the  1 8th  of  June,  1886,  at  Medford,  Massachusetts,  Mr.  Heath  was  united 
in  marriage  to  Miss  Georgina  A.  Rhodes,  who  passed  away  at  Hoquiam,  Wash- 
ington, leaving  two  children,  Ethel  and  William  Sidney  Heath.  For  his  second 
wife  Mr.  Heath  married  Miss  Olive  Hull,  at  Spokane,  Washington,  by  whom 
he  has  two  children,  Olive  and  James  Hull  Heath. 

Mr.  Heath  is  well  known  in  fraternal  circles.  On  attaining  his  majority  he 
joined  Havelock  Lodge,  No.  35,  K.  P.,  at  Waterville.  passed  through  all  of  its 
chairs  and  became  a  member  of  the  grand  lodge.  In  Masonry  he  has  attained  the 
thirty-second  degree  of  the  Scottish  Rite,  belonging  to  Hayden  Consistory  No.  4 
at  Olympia.  His  Blue  Lodge  connection  is  with  Hoquiam  Lodge  No.  64, 
F.  &  A.  M.,  and  he  is  also  a  member  of  Afifi  Temple,  A.  A.  O.  N.  M.  S.,  of 
Tacoma,  and  of  the  Elks  Lodge  at  Hoquiam.  He  is  likewise  a  member  of 
Hoquiam  Chapter  No.   5,  of  the  Sons  of  the  American  Revolution  and  in  all 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  237 

matters  of  citizenship  and  of  civic  interest  he  manifests  the  same  spirit  of  loyalty 
which  caused  his  great-grandsires  to  fight  for  American  liberty  and  his  father  to 
aid  in  maintaining  unbroken  the  great  American  union  of  states. 


COLONEL  HOWARD  HATHAWAY. 

Colonel  Howard  Hathaway,  a  member  of  the  bar  of  Everett,  Snohomish 
county,  state  of  Washington,  was  born  at  White  Stone,  Virginia,  October  27. 
1864,  the  son  of  Henry  S.  Hathaway,  also  a  native  of  Virginia,  and  a  representa- 
tive of  an  old  Virginia  family  established  there  in  1632.  The  founder  of  the 
family  was  William  Hathaway,  who  was  with  tiie  original  settlers  of  Jamestown. 
His  son,  William  Hathaway,  married  Sarah  Lawson,  whose  mother  was  Esther 
Chinn,  and  whose  grandmother  was  Esther  Ball,  the  daughter  of  Sir  William 
Ball.  Esther  Ball's  brother,  Joseph  Ball,  was  the  father  of  Mary  Ball,  the 
mother  of  George  Washington.  Among  the  descendants  of  William  Hathaway 
were  those  who  participated  in  the  American  Revolution  on  the  side  of  the  colonies, 
in  the  War  of  1812  and  in  all  subsequent  wars  this  country  has  been  engaged  in. 

Henry  S.  Hathaway,  the  father  of  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  prior  to  the 
Civil  war,  was  a  man  of  extensive  means  and  a  large  slave  holder,  and  for  a 
great  many  years  was  before  and  after  the  Civil  war  one  of  the  presiding 
justices  in  the  old  justice  court  of  Virginia.  At  the  outbreak  of  hostilities  between 
the  North  and  the  South  he  was  captain  of  the  Lancaster  Grays,  and  as  such 
participated  in  one  of  the  first  conflicts,  known  as  the  battle  of  "Pop  Castle." 
He  was  prominent  in  church  and  state,  and  possessed  of  considerable  oratorical 
gifts.  He  was  a  Baptist  in  his  religiovis  faith  and  a  man  of  strong  religious 
feeling.  He  died  November  12,  1892,  at  the  age  of  sixty-six  years,  and  was 
buried  at  Enon  Hall,  the  old  homestead  of  the  family.  His  wife,  whose  maiden 
name  was  Felecia  Toler  Dunaway,  was  born  at  the  old  Dunaway  homestead, 
known  as  Levelfield,  Lancaster  County,  Virginia,  December  27,  1839.  She  is  now 
living  at  Enon  Hall,  the  old  home  of  the  Hathaway  family,  near  White  Stone, 
Virginia,  and  is  a  woman  of  unusual  ability,  education  and  judgment,  wielding 
a  large  influence  in  her  community.  Her  ancestors  had  for  many  generations 
lived  at  the  old  Dunaway  homestead.  Colonel  Thomas  Stanford  Dunaway  was 
the  maternal  grandfather  of  Howard  Hathaway.  He.  also,  was  an  extensive 
planter  and  slave  owner  and  a  man  of  prominence  in  Mrginia  in  both  church 
and  state.  He  was  directly  descended  from  Derby  Dunaway.  founder  of  the 
American  branch  of  the  family,  who  came  to  the  new  world  in  1659  and  established 
his  home  in  the  Old  Dominion.  Among  his  descendants  were  those  who  ])ar- 
ticipated  in  the  American  Revolution,  the  War  of  1812  and  all  subsequent  wars 
this  country  has  been  engaged  in. 

Colonel  Lloward  Hathaway,  whose  name  introduces  this  review,  was  edu- 
cated in  Virginia  and  lived  upon  the  old  plantation  near  White  Stone,  Mrginia. 
He  had  a  large  and  lucrative  practice  there  and  took  an  active  i)art  in  i)ulitics. 
having  represented  Richmond  and  Lancaster  counties  for  a  number  of  terms 
in  the  legislature.  His  services  were  used  on  the  stump  in  all  the  political 
campaigns.     In   1901   he  visited  the  state  of  Washington  and  decided  to  settle 


238  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

at  Everett,  Washington,  and  practice  his  profession.  He  has  Hved  there  ever 
since  and  has  enjoyed  an  active  and  lucrative  practice.  He  has  taken  an  active 
and  prominent  part  in  the  politics  of  his  adopted  state,  having  been  nominated 
for  congressman  at  large  by  the  democratic  party,  and  sent  to  two  national 
conventions  as  delegate  from  his  state.  He  is  popular  as  an  orator  and  his 
services  are  frequently  sought  on  the  stump  and  elsewhere.  He  held  a  commis- 
sion on  the  governor's  staff.  He  was  married  on  the  4th  day  of  February,  1891, 
to  Miss  Jessie  Wilhelm  Hubbard,  a  native  of  Mrginia,  and  a  representative  of 
one  of  the  old  \'irginia  families.  As  a  result  of  said  marriage  there  was  born  one 
child,  a  boy,  Howard  Hathaway,  Jr.  He,  too,  is  a  lawyer  by  profession,  a 
graduate  of  Fork  Union  Alilitary  College  of  \'irginia  and  of  the  University  of 
Washington,  \vhich  conferred  upon  him  the  LL.  B.  degree  in  191 5.  Immediately 
after  graduation  he  was  associated  with  his  father  in  the  practice  of  his  chosen 
profession  and  so  continued  until  the  outbreak  of  hostilities  between  the  United 
States  and  Germany,  at  which  time  he  immediately  volunteered  and  was  accepted 
in  the  United  States  navy. 

The  subject  of  this  sketch  is  a  member  of  the  Sons  of  the  Revolution,  the 
Sons  of  the  Confederacy  and  several  fraternal  organizations  and  is  well  known 
in  club  circles.  All  of  his  ancestors  have  been  prominent  in  law,  letters,  church 
and  state. 


JUDGE  ORANGE  JACOBS. 

When  one  examines  into  the  records  of  Washington  it  will  be  seen  that  a 
potent  element  for  good  has  been  the  work  of  Judge  Orange  Jacobs,  deceased, 
who  was  one  of  the  territorial  chief  justices  and  who  throughout  his  entire  life 
remained  an  active  factor  in  public  affairs  in  the  northwest.  A  native  of  New 
York,  Judge  Jacobs  was  born  in  Genesee,  Livingston  county,. on  the  2d  of  May, 
1827,  and  was  descended  from  English  ancestry,  although  representatives  of  the 
name  have  lived  in  America  from  early  colonial  days,  when  the  family  was 
founded  in  ^lassachusetts.  Hiram  Jacobs,  the  father,  was  a  native  of  New 
Hampshire  and  he  served  in  the  Black  Hawk  war  with  the  rank  of  captain. 
In  the  east  he  married  Phebe  Jenkins,  a  native  of  Massachusetts,  and  in  1830 
they  removed  westward  to  Sturgis,  Alichigan,  where  they  became  farming  people. 
It  was  thus  that  ]\Ir.  Jacobs  became  identified  with  the  military  operations  which 
subdued  the  red  men  in  Illinois  and  led  to  their  removal  westward.  In  1849, 
attracted  by  the  gold  discoveries  in  California,  he  made  his  way  over  the  plains, 
crossing  the  hot  stretches  of  sand  and  traversing  the  mountain  passes  until  he 
reached  the  Pacific  coast,  remaining  for  three  years  in  that  section  of  the  country'. 

Judge  Jacobs  was  reared  amid  pioneer  surroundings  and  his  early  education 
was  acquired  in  one  of  the  old-time  log  schoolhouses  of  the  frontier.  Later  he 
had  the  opportunity  of  pursuing  his  studies  in  Albion  Seminary  and  still  later  he 
matriculated  in  the  University  of  Michigan  at  Ann  Arbor.  When  a  young  man 
he  took  up  the  profession  of  teaching  and  while  thus  engaged  devoted  his 
leisure  hours  to  the  study  of  law.  In  1852  he  was  admitted  to  the  bar  and  believ- 
ing that  he  might  have  better  opportunities  in  the  new  and  growing  west,  he 
crossed  the  plains  to  Oregon.     In  1857  he  became  a  resident  of  Jackson  county. 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  239 

Oregon,  where  for  several  years  he  was  accorded  a  liberal  clientage  in  the 
practice  of  law.  Moreover,  he  became  a  leader  of  public  thought  and  action  both 
through  his  public  work  and  through  his  connection  with  journalism.  For  a 
number  of  years  he  edited  and  published  the  Jacksonville  Sentinel  and  wrote 
strong  and  logical  arguments  to  uphold  the  Union  and  to  present  the  question  of 
secession  in  the  light  in  which  he  viewed  it.  He  was  also  an  opponent  of  slavery 
and  in  the  name  of  humanity  urged  the  adoption  of  higher  national  standards 
regarding  these  questions.  Then  the  republican  party  sprang  into,  existence,  the 
result  of  the  efforts  of  men  who  wished  to  prevent  the  further  extension  of 
slavery  into  the  north.  Judge  Jacobs  joined  the  ranks  of  the  new  organization 
and  such  was  his  ability  and  prominence  in  the  party  that  he  lacked  but  one  vote 
of  becoming  its  candidate  for  the  United  States  senate.  In  the  meantime  as  a 
lawyer  he  had  become  well  established  by  reason  of  his  superior  ability  in  pre- 
senting a  cause  before  the  courts,  his  logical  deductions  and  his  clear,  forceful 
reasoning. 

In  1867  he  was  appointed  associate  justice  of  the  supreme  court  of  Washing- 
ton territory  and  he  had  served  upon  the  bench  for  less  than  a  year,  when,  without 
solicitation  upon  his  part,  the  general  assembly  of  the  territory  asked  for  him 
presidential  appointment  to  the  position  of  chief  justice.  President  Grant 
acquiesced  in  this  request  and  for  six  years  Judge  Jacobs  sat  upon  the  bench  of 
last  resort  in  the  highest  judicial  position  within  the  territory.  The  fairness  and 
impartiality  of  his  decisions  have  ever  been  widely  recognized  and  he  is  one 
of  the  eminent  members  of  the  bar  of  the  northwest,  whose  course  reflects 
great  credit  and  honor  upon  the  judicial  history  of  the  state.  When  the  repub- 
licans nominated  him  for  the  office  of  delegate  to  the  United  States  congress 
he  resigned  his  position  upon  the  bench,  entered  upon  the  work  of  the  campaign 
and  was  elected,  representing  the  territory  in  the  national  halls  of  legislation 
during  the  fifty-fourth  and  fifty-fifth  congresses.  It  was  his  desire  to  see  Wash- 
ington admitted  into  the  Union  and  he  put  forth  every  effort  to  bring  this  about. 
He  was  also  instrumental  in  gaining  increased  postal  facilities  for  the  territory 
and  in  securing  the  passage  of  the  lighthouse  bill.  He  gave  careful  considera- 
tion to  each  question  which  came  up  for  public  settlement  but  at  the  end  of  two 
years  he  declined  to  again  become  a  candidate  and  returned  to  Seattle,  where 
he  resumed  the  private  practice  of  his  profession.  His  fellow  townsmen,  how- 
ever, were  not  content  to  have  him  out  of  office  and  in  1880  elected  him  t'o  the 
position  of  mayor  of  Seattle  and  would  have  renominated  him  at  the  close  of 
his  first  term  had  he  not  declined  to  again  become  a  candidate.  In  1884,  how- 
ever, he  was  once  more  called  to  public  life,  being  elected  a  member  of  the 
territorial  council  and  in  that  body  he  was  made  chairman  of  the  judiciary 
committee  and  of  the  committee  on  education.  His  work  was  far-reaching  and 
beneficial  in  its  effects.  He  was  very  active  in  securing  the  appropriation  for 
the  penitentiary,  for  the  insane  asylum  and  for  the  university,  and  for  many 
years  he  took  a  very  deep  and  helpful  interest  in  promoting  the  welfare  of  the 
university.  For  many  years  he  acted  on  the  board  of  regents  and  for  a  decade 
was  treasurer  of  the  board.  In  1889  he  was  elected  a  member  of  the  commission 
to  form  a  new  charter  for  the  city  of  Seattle  and  here  his  signal  ability  and 
knowledge  of  law  proved  of  great  value  in  securing  the  paper  which  gave  a 
legal  existence  to  the  city.     The  charter  was  adopted  by  public  vote  in   1890, 


240  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

and  under  its  new  municipal  organization  Judge  Jacobs  had  the  honor  of  being 
elected  corporation  counsel.  In  1896  he  was  elected  superior  judge  of  King 
county,  serving  for  four  years,  during  most  of  which  time  he  had  charge  of 
the  criminal  department.  During  the  whole  of  his  long  service  on  the  bench 
very  few  of  the  cases  decided  by  him  were  appealed  and  carried  to  the  supreme 
court  and  such  was  the  wisdom  of  his  opinions  that  only  three  of  his  decisions 
in  criminal  cases  were  ever  reversed. 

On  the  1st  of  Januar}%  1858,  Judge  Jacobs  was  married  to  Miss  Lucinda 
Davenport,  a  native  of  Ohio,  and  a  daughter  of  Dr.  Benjamin  Davenport,  of 
that  state,  who  in  1851  crossed  the  plains  to  Oregon.  Dr.  Davenport  was  a 
graduate  of  Rush  Medical  College  of  Chicago  and  made  his  way  to  the  west 
in  1 85 1  on  account  of  his  health.  He  settled  in  Marion  county,  Oregon,  where 
he  had  a  claim,  to  which  he  devoted  his  attention  but  did  not  resume  the  practice 
of  medicine  after  his  removal  to  the  west.  He  brought  his  family  with  him, 
driving  across  the  country  with  ox  teams  over  what  is  now  known  as  the  Oregon 
trail.  His  wife  bore  the  maiden  name  of  Sarah  Gott  and  they  had  five  children, 
four  sons  and  one  daughter.  Timothy  W.  studied  medicine  but  turned  to  country 
Hfe  and  engaged  in  farming.  He  became  a  great  student  but  has  now  passed 
away.  John  C,  a  resident  of  Hoquiam,  has  engaged  in  merchandising,  in  milling 
and  trading.  Joseph,  who  resided  in  Colfax,  Washington,  is  deceased.  Ben- 
jamin, who  resided  on  the  old  family  homestead  in  Marion  county,  Oregon, 
and  engaged  in  farming,  is  also  now  deceased. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jacobs  became  the  parents  of  ten  children,  seven  of  whom  are 
living:  Hiram  J.,  Harry,  Edwin,  Orange,  Estella,  Donna  and  Jessie.  Of  these 
the  eldest  daughter  is  now  the  wife  of  A.  L.  Clark.  Abraham  Lincoln  passed 
away  in  1907.  In  1848  Judge  Jacobs  became  a  member  of  the  Independent 
Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  continuing  in  connection  therewith  until  his  demise, 
filling  all  of  the  offices  in  the  subordinate  organization.  He  was  made  a  Master 
Mason  in  Sturgis,  ^Michigan,  in  1852,  and  his  hfe  exemplified  the  beneficent 
spirit  of  the  craft.  Mrs.  Jacobs  is  a  member  of  the  Pioneer  Society  and  of  the 
Suffrage  Club.  The  death  of  Judge  Jacobs  occurred  May  22,  1914.  when  in 
his  eighty-eighth  year.  He  was  numbered  among  the  honored  pioneer  settlers, 
lawyers  and  jurists  of  the  northwest  and  the  impress  of  his  individuality  was 
always  an  element  for  good  along  the  different  lines  in  which  he  put  forth  his 
activity.  He  worked  with  equal  sincerity  and  purpose  for  the  upbuilding  of 
his  city,  for  the  interests  of  the  state  and  for  the  progress  of  the  nation,  as  at 
different  periods  he  was  connected  with  affairs  of  his  municipality,  his  common- 
wealth and  his  country. 


HON.  THOMAS  MALVERN  VANCE. 

Hon.  Thomas  Malvern  ^'ance  has  built  up  an  extensive  and  representative 
practice  in  Olympia  and  has  also  held  important  public  office,  having  served  for 
four  years  as  assistant  attorney  general  of  the  state.  He  was  born  in  North 
Carolina  on  the  6th  of  September,  1862.  a  son  of  Zebulon  B.  and  Harriet  (Espy) 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  241 

A^ance.  The  family  has  been  long  represented  in  America  and  is  traced  back  to 
David  Vance,  the  great-grandfather  of  our  subject,  who  was  an  early  settler  in 
Virginia  and  held  the  rank  of  lieutenant  in  the  Continental  army  in  the  Revolu- 
tionary war.  He  took  part  in  the  battle  of  King's  Mountain  and  was  with  Wash- 
ington's troops  during  the  winter  of  hardship  and  privation  at  Valley  Forge. 
After  the  restoration  of  peace  he  settled  in  Buncombe  county,  North  Carolina, 
and  there  his  son,  David  \'ance,  Jr.,  was  born.  The  latter  spent  his  entire  life 
in  the  Old  North  state  and  gained  prominence  as  a  civil  engineer.  He  was  the 
father  of  Zebulon  B.  \^ance,  whose  birth  occurred  in  North  Carolina,  May  13, 
1830.  After  attending  private  schools  he  entered  Washington  College  in 
Tennessee  and  still  later  was  a  student  in  the  University  of  North  Carolina, 
from  which  he  was  graduated  in  1852.  He  located  in  Asheville,  North  Caro- 
lina, and  began  the  practice  of  law  there.  In  1854  he  was  elected  to  the  state 
legislature  and  in  1857  was  chosen  to  represent  his  district  in  the  house  ot 
representatives  of  congress.  He  served  in  that  capacity  until  the  outbreak  of  the 
Civil  war,  when  he  cast  in  his  lot  with  the  Confederate  states,  becoming  colonel 
of  the  Twenty-sixth  North  Carolina  Regiment.  In  1862  he  was  chosen  governor 
of  North  Carolina,  was  reelected  in  1864  and  served  as  chief  executive  until 
the  close  of  the  war  in  1865.  when  General  Canby  was  made  military  governor 
and  took  control  of  the  state  afifairs.  In  1870  Mr.  Vance  was  elected  United 
States  senator,  but  as  his  disability  on  account  of  his  war  service  had  not  yet 
been  removed,  he  resigned.  He  continued  in  the  practice  of  law  at  Charlotte, 
North  Carolina,  until  1876,  when  he  was  made  governor  of  North  Carolina, 
which  in  the  meantime  had  been  readmitted  to  the  Union,  and  in  1879  he  became 
United  States  senator,  to  which  office  he  was  thrice  reelected.  He  died  in  1894, 
while  serving  his  third  term.  Fraternallv  he  was  a  Mason.  He  was  married  in 
1854,  in  Morganton,  North  Carolina,  to  Miss  Harriet  Espy,  who  was  descended 
from  a  line  of  prominent  Presbyterian  ministers.  Her  father,  a  minister  of 
that  church,  went  to  the  South  from  Pennsylvania  in  the  early  '20s.  To  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Vance  were  born  four  children,  of  whom  three  survive,  those  besides 
the  subject  of  this  review  being:  Zebulon  B..  Jr..  who  saw  service  in  the 
Philippine  islands  as  captain  of  the  Eleventh  United  States  Infantry;  and  Charles 
N.,  a  bond  broker  residing  in  Washington,   D.   C. 

Thomas  M.  Vance  received  a  liberal  education  for  after  completing  a  course 
in  the  University  of  North  Carolina  he  entered  the  law  school  of  Columbian. 
now  George  Washington,  University,  at  Washington,  D.  C.  He  left  that  institu- 
tion in  1883  and  in  February,  1884,  was  admitted  to  the  bar  by  the  supreme 
court  of  North  Carolina.  He  practiced  in  that  state  for  several  years  and  in 
1889  was  presidential  elector  from  the  eighth  district.  At  length,  however,  he 
came  west  and  served  as  receiver  of  the  public  moneys  at  North  Yakima,  under 
appointment  of  President  Cleveland,  for  two  years.  Subsequently  he  engagec'. 
in  the  private  practice  of  law  until  1897,  when  he  was  appointed  assistant  attorney 
general  of  Washington,  which  office  he  filled  until  January,  19OT.  In  1900  he  was 
the  candidate  of  the  democratic  party  for  attorney  general  of  the  state,  but  as 
the  democrats  were  in  the  minority  failed  of  election.  His  naturally  keen  and 
logical  mind  has  been  thoroughly  disciplined  through  close  study  and  he  is  recog- 
nized as  an  opponent  worthy  the  best  efforts  of  any  attorney  in  the  state.  The 
high  standing  which  he  has  gained  at  the  bar  is  the  natural  result  of  his  ability. 


242  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

his  habit  of  careful  preparation  and  his  well  merited  reputation   for  devotion 
to  the  interests  of  his  clients. 

Mr.  Vance  was  married  in  1887  ^o  Miss  Gertrude  Wheeler,  a  native  of  Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin,  and  a  daughter  of  Colonel  J.  B.  Wheeler,  who  was  professor 
of  engineering  at  the  United  States  Military  Academy  at  West  Point.  He  has 
proved  worthy  of  his  distinguished  ancestry  and  the  name  of  A^ance  is  an  honored 
one  in  Olympia  and  indeed  throughout  the  state. 


ORSON  M.  KELLOGG. 


The  achievements  of  Orson  M.  Kellogg  have  made  him  a  most  prominent 
factor  in  the  business  circles  of  Western  Washington,  and  while  developing  and 
directing  important  interests  as  one  of  the  foremost  lumbermen  of  this  section 
of  the  country,  he  has  at  the  same  time  found  opportunity  to  cooperate  in  well 
defined  plans  and  measures  for  the  upbuilding  of  the  section  with  which  he  has 
allied  his  interests.  A  native  of  Michigan,  Mr.  Kellogg  was  born  in  Grand 
Rapids,  September  2,  1853.  His  father,  Orson  C.  Kellogg,  one  of  the  early 
residents  of  that  state,  celebrated  his  ninetieth  birthday  anniversary  in  November, 
19 16,  and  still  resides  in  Grand  Rapids.  O.  M.  Kellogg  spent  his  boyhood  in  his 
native  city  and  at  an  early  age  became  interested  in  the  lumber  business,  entering 
into  active  connection  with  that  industry  as  an  employe  of  E.  K.  Wood.  While 
in  Michigan  he  worked  for  E.  K.  Wood  for  seven  years,  and  for  thirty  years 
he  has  been  an  active  factor  and  stockholder  in  the  E.  K.  Wood  Lumber  Company 
in  Washington,  remaining  throughout  the  entire  period  of  his  business  career  in 
close  connection  with  Mr.  Wood,  of  whose  interests  he  is  one  of  the  most  trusted 
and  responsible  representatives. 

Mr.  Kellogg  was  still  a  resident  of  Michigan  when  in  1877  he  wedded  Miss 
Nettie  R.  Gibbs,  a  native  of  that  state,  and  to  them  have  been  born  two  children, 
George  and  Chester.  The  elder  son,  born  in  July,  1878,  was  graduated  from  the 
Leland  Stanford  University  of  California  with  the  class  of  1904  and  is  now 
assistant  manager  of  the  E.  K.  Wood  Company  at  Hoquiam.  He  was  married 
October  i,  191 1,  to  Miss  Ida  Smith,  of  Seattle,  Washington,  and  they  have  two 
children,  Marian  and  Virginia.  The  younger  son,  Chester,  was  graduated  from 
Culver  Military  Academy  in  191 6  and  is  now  a  student  in  the  University  of 
Washington. 

The  family  continued  to  reside  in  Michigan  until  1886  and  then  removed  to 
Washington,  settling  in  Grays  Harbor  county,  which  was  then  Chehalis  county. 
They  established  their  home  in  Aberdeen  and  there  Mr.  Kellogg  remained  for 
ten  years,  taking  an  active  interest  in  the  young  city  and  doing  much  to  further 
municipal  development  and  progress  there.  He  was  a  member  of  the  first  city 
council  and  has  been  one  of  the  most  active,  popular  and  prominent  leaders  in 
affairs  that  have  contributed  to  the  material  development  of  his  district  and  the 
promotion  of  many  of  its  most  important  public  interests.  What  he  has  accom- 
plished represents  the  wise  utilization  of  his  time,  talents  and  opportunities. 
His  interests  are  various,  his  counsel  is  widely  sought  and  his  integrity  is  un- 
impeachable.    He  has  been  associated  with  the  E.  K.  Wood  Lumber  Company 


ORSON  M.  KELLOGG 


:    THE  /...KK 

PUBLIC  LIBRARY 

ASTOR,    LENOX 
Tlt-DEN   FOUNDATIOM 


1 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  245 

since  it  began  operations  in  Washington.  In  1893  the  E.  K.  Wood  Lumber 
Company  purchased  a  small  mill  which  is  still  being  operated,  although  from 
time  to  time  it  has  been  enlarged  until  it  now  has  an  average  daily  output  of  one 
hundred  and  sixty  thousand  feet  of  lumber  every  ten  hours  and  employs  about 
one  hundred  and  forty  people  at  Hoquiam.  The  company  also  has  another 
mill  at  Bellingham,  Washington.  Under  the  management  of  Mr.  Kellogg  the 
Hoquiam  branch  of  the  E.  K.  Wood  Lumber  Company  has  continuously  expanded 
and  prospered.  Not  only  this  but  other  interests  in  Hoquiam  are  indebted  to 
Mr.  Kellogg  for  his  interest  and  help.  He  is  now  the  vice  president  and  one  of 
the  directors  of  the  First  National  Bank  of  Hoquiam  and  is  justly  accounted  one 
of  the  most  prominent  and  representative  business  men  of  western  Washington, 
his  interests  and  activities  reaching  out  over  a  broad  field.  He  served  for  several 
years  as  a  member  of  the  school  board  and  the  cause  of  education  finds  in  him 
a  stalwart  champion.  In  fact  he  stands  for  all  those  progressive  movements 
looking  to  the  welfare  and  upbuilding  of  his  district  and  in  public  matters,  as  in 
private  business,  he  displays  sound  judgment  and  keen  discrimination.  What  he 
has  undertaken  he  has  accomplished.  He  began  business  life  in  a  humble  capacity 
but  by  indefatigable  energy,  good  judgment  and  thorough  dependability  he  has 
risen  to  a  position  of  financial  independence  and  enviable  social  rank.  Fraternally 
he  is  identified  with  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  the  Masons, 
having  taken  both  the  York  and  Scottish  Rite  degrees  in  the  latter  organization. 
He  became  a  charter  member  of  the  Aberdeen  lodge  of  Masons  and  served  as 
its  secretary.  Mr.  Kellogg  is  also  a  popular  member  of  the  Country  Club  and  in 
politics  is  a  stanch  republican. 


JUDGE  HENRY  G.  STRUVE. 

Judge  Henry  G.  Struve  was  for  years  a  very  prominent  figure  in  connection 
with  the  political,  legal,  financial  and  social  history  of  the  state  of  Washington 
and  was  an  honored  resident  of  Seattle.  Although  born  in  the  grand  duchy  of 
Oldenburg,  Germany,  on  the  17th  of  November,  1836,  of  German  parentage,  he 
came  to  America  at  the  age  of  sixteen  years  and  was  an  intensely  patriotic  Ameri- 
can citizen.  He  received  a  thorough  academic  education  in  his  native  city  and 
after  reaching  the  new  world  remained  in  the  east  for  a  few  weeks,  while  later 
he  made  his  way  westward  to  finish  his  education  and  take  up  his  life  work.  In 
1853  he  reached  California,  where  for  six  years  he  studied  law,  engaged  in 
newspaper  work  and  in  mining  near  Jackson,  Amador  county.  He  was  admitted 
to  the  bar  in  1859  and  the  following  year  removed  to  Vancouver,  Washington, 
where  he  purchased  the  Vancouver  Chronicle,  which  he  published  success full> 
for  a  year.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period  he  entered  upon  the  practice  of  law 
and  his  ability  soon  brought  him  to  the  front  in  his  profession.  He  was  also  an 
ardent  republican  and  in  a  short  time  was  recognized  as  one  of  the  leaders  of  his 
party  in  the  state.  In  1862  he  was  elected  district  attorney  for  the  second  judicial 
district  and  made  such  a  brilliant  success  that  he  was  four  times  chosen  for  the 
position.     During  his  fourth  term,  or  in  1869,  he  resigned,  having  been  elected 

Vol.   11—13 


246  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

probate  judge  of  Clarke  county.  A  few  months  later  he  also  resigned  that  posi- 
tion. While  acting  as  prosecuting  attorney  he  was  also  elected,  in  1865,  a  member 
of  the  lower  house  of  the  state  legislative  assembly,  in  which  he  served  as  chair- 
man of  the  judiciary  committee.  In  1867  he  was  elected  a  member  of  the  legisla- 
tive council  and  was  its  president  in  the  first  and  in  subsequent  sessions  of  1869 
and  1870.  He  acted  as  chairman  of  the  ways  and  means  committee  and  in  1869 
introduced  and  was  instrumental  in  securing  the  passage  of  the  community  law, 
regulating  the  rights  in  property  interests  of  married  persons,  an  important  law 
which  superseded  the  provisions  of  the  old  common  law  then  in  force  in  Wash- 
ington territory.  The  law  is  with  slight  modification  still  in  force.  Although  one 
of  the  youngest  members  of  the  legislature.  Judge  Struve  ,was  always  a  recognized 
leader  on  the  floor  of  the  house. 

In  1 87 1,  in  which  year  he  removed  to  Olympia,  Judge  Struve  took  charge 
of  the  Puget  Sound  Daily  Courier,  a  leading  republican  organ.  His  work  and 
editorials  made  it  a  valuable  factor  in  promoting  party  interests,  his  editorials 
being  widely  copied  and  attracting  great  attention  and  comment.  To  the  regret  of 
all,  he  left  newspaper  work,  in  which  he  had  manifested  such  capability,  in 
1871,  when  President  Grant,  as  a  token  of  appreciation,  appointed  him  secretary 
of  Washington  territory.  The  following  year  he  was  selected  by  the  republican 
convention  as  a  delegate  to  the  national  convention,  which  once  more  nominated 
General  Grant  for  the  presidency  at  Philadelphia.  Judge  Struve  served  as  terri- 
torial secretary  until  the  close  of  Grant's  administration,  when  his  term  expired. 
He  then  returned  to  Olympia  and  practiced  law  again,  but  his  ability  again  and 
again  led  to  his  selection  for  public  duties  of  honor,  trust  and  responsibility.  He 
was  appointed  a  commissioner  to  codify  the  laws  of  Washington  territory  in  1877 
but  after  a  year  was  obliged  to  resign  because  his  law  practice  required  his  undi- 
vided attention. 

In  1879  Judge  Struve  removed  to  Seattle  and  with  John  Leary  formed  the 
firm  of  Struve  &  Leary.  In  1880  Colonel  J.  C.  Haines  was  taken  into  the  firm 
and  in  1884  Maurice  McMicken  was  added  and  Mr.  Leary  withdrew.  Five  years 
later  Colonel  Haines  withdrew  and  the  firm  then  became  Struve  &  McMicken. 
While  territorial  secretary  Judge  Struve  was  sole  attorney  for  the  Northern  Pa- 
cific Railroad  Company  in  Washington  and  until  1883  conducted  personally  all 
important  litigation  for  the  railroad. 

From  the  beginning  of  his  residence  in  Seattle,  Judge  Struve  was  a  recognized 
leader  in  the  city  and  was  largely  instrumental  in  molding  public  thought  and 
action.  In  1882  he  was  elected  mayor  and  was  reelected  in  1883,  during  which 
time  Seattle  took  its  first  steps  toward  its  present  greatness,  five  hundred  thousand 
dollars  being  spent  in  public  improvements,  including  the  grading  of  the  streets. 
The  population  increased  from  three  thousand  to  ten  thousand  in  1883.  As 
mayor  of  the  city  Judge  Struve  received  the  Villard  party  when  the  Northern 
Pacific  was  completed.  His  activities  extended  to  almost  every  field  which  has 
had  to  do  with  the  upbuilding  of  city  and  state.  In  1879  ^^  was  appointed  regent 
of  Washington  University  and  continued  in  that  position  through  many  years, 
serving  as  president  for  four  consecutive  terms.  In  1884  he  was  elected  school 
director  and  held  the  office  for  three  years,  doing  efficient  work  in  connection 
with  the  cause  of  public  education  in  Seattle.  In  1886  he  was  appointed  by  Gover- 
nor Squire  to  the  position  of  judge  advocate  general  of  Washington  territory  and 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  247 

took  a  prominent  part  in  directing  military  affairs  when  Seattle  was  under  martial 
law  following  the  Chinese  riots  which  occurred  in  February,  1886.  In  the  fol- 
lowing year  he  was  appointed  supreme  court  reporter  and  supervised  Volume  III 
of  the  Washington  Territory  Reports.  He  was  elected  a  member  of  the  board  of 
freeholders  which  prepared  the  charter  for  Seattle  and  he  was  chairman  of  the 
committee  on  judiciary  and  tide  lands.  He  soon  had  to  refuse  many  honors  and 
confined  his  attention  to  his  office,  acting  solely  as  attorney  for  many  railway, 
mill  and  coal  corporations.  He  was  greatly  interested  in  historical  research  and 
for  years  investigated  Washington's  earlier  history  in  his  leisure  hours,  intending 
to  publish  the  results  of  his  investigations  in  book  form,  but  the  great  fire  of 
June  6,  1889,  destroyed  all  of  his  data.  However,  he  started  in  again  on  the  work 
at  a  later  period. 

Judge  Struve  played  an  important  part  in  the  material  development  of  Wash- 
ington in  connection  Vv^ith  its  mining  and  railroad  interests  and  financial  institu- 
tions. He  was  one  of  the  organizers  of  the  cable  system  of  street  cars  in  Seattle, 
became  a  large  stockholder  in  the  company  and  was  president  of  the  Madison 
street  line.  He  became  one  of  the  promoters  of  and  a  director  in  the  Home 
Insurance  Company,  which  paid  a  hundred-thousand-dollar  fire  loss  June  6,  1889. 
He  was  one  of  the  incorporators,  directors  and  the  vice  president  of  the  Boston 
National  Bank  and  was  sole  agent  in  Washington  for  the  German  Savings  & 
Loan  Society  of  San  Francisco.  His  connection  with  any  enterprise  or  project 
assured  its  success  through  his  individual  efforts,  for  in  his  vocabulary  there  was 
no  such  word  as  fail  and  he  carried  forward  to  completion  whatever  he  under- 
took. He  was  known  as  an  able  financier  and  a  conservative,  sagacious  man  of 
business  as  well  as  Washington's  most  distinguished  jurist. 

In  October,  1863,  Judge  Struve  was  married  to  Miss  Lascelle  Knighton,  who 
was  born  in  Fort  Leavenworth,  Kansas,  in  1846.  When  she  was  but  a  year  old 
her  father,  Captain  H.  M.  Knighton,  made  his  way  across  the  plains  to  St.  Helen, 
Oregon,  and  became  the  owner  of  the  town  site.  He  was  the  first  marshal  of 
the  provisional  government  of  Oregon  and  was  prominently  identified  with  the 
pioneer  development  of  the  northwest.  He  afterward  removed  with  his  family 
to  Vancouver,  Washington,  and  Mrs.  Struve  was  educated  there  in  the  Convent 
of  the  Sacred  Heart.  She  became  the  wife  of  Judge  Struve  in  Vancouver,  in  1863, 
and  died  in  Seattle  in  1903,  after  an  illness  of  three  years.  Hers  was  a  strongly 
religious  nature.  She  was  philanthropic,  charitable,  gracious,  generous,  unselfish 
and  sincere.  She  was  a  social  leader,  possessing  a  magnetic  personality,  and  as  a 
hostess  she  was  unexcelled.  She  shared  her  husband's  prominence  and  the  whole 
state  sorrowed  when  she  passed  away.  Judge  Henry  Struve  died  in  New  York 
city  on  Tuesday  morning,  June  13,  1905,  after  a  brief  illness.  His  death  was  very 
unexpected,  his  daughter  Mary  being  the  only  member  of  the  family  with  him  at 
the  time.  Judge  and  Mrs.  Struve  became  parents  of  four  children :  Captain 
Harry  K.  Struve,  Mrs.  H.  F.  Meserve,  Frederick  K.  and  Mary. 

Judge  Struve  was  known  prominently  in  many  fraternal  and  benevolent  socie- 
ties. In  1874  he  was  elected  grand  master  of  the  grand  lodge  of  Odd  Fellows  in 
Oregon,  which  then  embraced  Washington  and  Idaho.  In  1876  he  was  elected 
representative  of  that  jurisdiction  in  the  sovereign  grand  lodge  and  he  instituted 
the  grand  lodge  of  Washington.  Such  in  brief  is  the  history  of  one  who  left 
the  impress  of  his  individuality  upon  the  development  of  the  northwest  in  many 


248  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

ways.  He  saw  its  opportunities  and  utilized  them  and  in  the  development  of  his 
individual  fortunes  he  contributed  to  the  upbuilding  of  the  empire  of  the  north- 
west. He  stood  in  a  prominent  position  as  a  journalist,  as  a  distinguished  lawyer 
and  as  a  business  man,  his  life  verifying  the  statement  that  power  grows  through 
the  exercise  of  effort.  As  he  progressed,  his  opportunities  and  his  advantages 
increased  and  he  gathered  to  himself  the  rewards  of  a  well  spent  life,  but,  more 
than  that,  he  upheld  the  political  and  legal  status  of  the  community  and  con- 
tributed to  its  intellectual  and  moral  stability. 


FREDERICK  KARL  STRUVE. 

Frederick  Karl  Struve,  president  of  the  Seattle  National  Bank,  has  at  every 
point  in  his  career  seemed  to  have  attained  the  utmost  success  possible  at  that 
point.  In  a  word,  he  has  readily  recognized  and  utilized  every  opportunity  and 
by  successive  stages  of  business  development  and  advancement  he  has  reached 
his  present  enviable  position  as  a  leading  financier  of  the  northwest. 

Mr.  Struve  is  a  native  of  Washington,  his  birth  having  occurred  at  Van- 
couver, June  17,  1871.  He  is  a  son  of  Judge  Henry  G.  Struve,  whose  record 
precedes  this.  His  education  was  acquired  in  the  public  schools  and  in  the 
University  of  Washington,  followed  by  matriculation  in  the  literary  department 
of  the  University  of  Michigan  at  Ann  Arbor,  where  he  spent  two  years  in  study. 
In  November,  1889,  upon  the  organization  of  the  Boston  National  Bank,  he 
was  made  clerk  in  that  institution  and  later  became  assistant  cashier,  serving 
until  April  i,  1898.  He  afterward  spent  some  time  with  the  First  National  Bank. 
In  1899,  he  formed  a  partnership  with  John  Davis  in  the  real  estate,  loan  and 
insurance  business  under  the  name  of  John  Davis  &  Company.  This  firm  has 
become  one  of  the  best  known  in  the  city,  the  volume  of  business  transacted 
by  them  annually  reaching  extensive  proportions.  From  1896  until  his  election 
as  president  of  the  Seattle  National  Bank,  Mr.  Struve  was  the  Seattle  repre- 
sentative of  the  German  Savings  &  Loan  Society  of  San  Francisco  which  did 
the  largest  loan  business  in  Washington.  The  firm  of  John  Davis  &  Company 
also  have  a  large  mortgage  loan  clientage  and  their  operations  in  real  estate 
annually  reach  a  high  figure.  They  platted  the  Highland  addition  and  Mr.  Struve 
individually  platted  the  Pettit  addition,  while  the  firm  platted  the  Yesler  estate 
addition  and  built  thereon  residences  which  have  so  greatly  improved  and  beau- 
ified  that  part  of  the  city.  The  general  business  of  the  firm,  however,  consists 
of  transactions  in  down  town  properties,  many  of  which  they  have  handled, 
negotiating  important  sales  and  also  attending  to  the  rental  of  many  of  the 
leading  business  blocks.  The  renting  department  has  become  an  important  fea- 
ture of  their  business  and  its  conduct  requires  eighteen  employes  all  of  whom  are 
engaged  at  stated  salaries.  Each  department  of  the  business  is  managed  by 
a  competent  superintendent  and  all  is  systematized  and  in  splendid  working 
condition.  Their  transactions  involve  the  handling  of  many  thousands  of  dollars 
within  the  course  of  a  month  and  the  business  is  hardly  second  to  any  in  this 
line  in  the  city.  Following  the  death  of  Jacob  Furth,  president  of  the  Seattle 
National  Bank,  Mr.   Struve,  who  had  served  as  vice  president,  was  elected  to 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  249 

fill  the  vacancy,  becoming  president  of  the  institution  on  the  ist  of  September, 
1914.  He  has  since  held  that  office  and  has  bent  his  energies  to  administrative 
direction  and  executive  control.  His  efforts  have  been  well  defined  and  his 
keen  perception  of  the  possibilities  of  the  situation  has  led  to  his  steady  advance- 
ment in  the  business  world. 

Mr.  Struve  was  married  November  17,  1897,  to  Miss  Anna  Furth,  daughter 
of  Jacob  Furth,  a  sketch  of  whom  appears  elsewhere  in  this  work,  and,  presiding 
with  graciousness  over  their  hospitable  home,  she  has  made  it  one  of  the  attractive 
social  centers  of  Seattle.  She  belongs  to  the  ladies'  adjunct  of  the  Golf  Club,  to 
some  of  the  more  prominent  literary  organizations  of  the  city,  is  a  member  of  the 
executive  committee  of  the  Assembly  Club  and  also  a  member  of  Trinity  parish 
church. 

Mr.  Struve  has  membership  in  the  Assembly  Club,  of  which  he  has  served 
as  treasurer.  He  belongs  also  to  the  Rainier  Club,  the  Firloch  Club,  the  Uni- 
versity Club,  the  Seattle  Tennis  Club  and  the  Seattle  Golf  and  Country  Club, 
of  which  he  has  been  the  secretary,  all  of  Seattle,  and  the  Union  Club  of  Tacoma, 
He  became  one  of  the  organizers  of  the  Seattle  Athletic  Club,  was  chosen  the 
first  captain  of  the  athletic  team  and  later  was  elected  the  vice  president  of  the 
society.  He  is  likewise  a  member  of  the  Chi  Psi  fraternity  and  he  is  identified 
with  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  giving  stalwart  support  to  its  well  defined  plans 
and  projects  for  the  upbuilding  and  improvement  of  the  city.  Politically  his 
allegiance  is  one  of  the  supporting  features  of  the  republican  party  in  Seattle. 
He  greatly  enjoys  travel  and.  besides  extensive  visits  to  all  parts  of  America, 
he  has  visited  Cuba  and  Europe.  In  shorter  periods  of  recreation  he  turns  to 
golf  and  outdoor  sports.  Of  him  it  has  been  said:  "He  is  widely  known  as  a 
young  man  of  marked  executive  force.  Intricate  business  situations  he  readily 
comprehends,  he  forms  his  plans  quickly  and  is  prompt  and  accurate  in  their 
execution.  Thus  he  has  gained  a  wide  reputation  as  a  capable  and  successful 
man  of  business,  a  typical  representative  of  the  enterprise  that  has  led  to  the 
marvelous  development  of  the  northwest." 


LESLIE  R.  COFFIN. 


Prominently  connected  with  traction  interests  in  Bellingham  and  northwestern 
Washington  is  Leslie  R.  Coffin  who  is  manager  of  the  Puget  Sound  Traction, 
Light  &  Power  Company  and  also  the  Pacific  Northwest  Traction  Company. 
He  is  thoroughly  posted  on  the  improvements  and  vital  problems  that  have  to  do 
with  traction  interests  both  in  construction  and  operation  as  well  as  in  service  and 
there  is  no  feature  of  the  business  with  which  he  is  not  familiar.  His  capa- 
bility therefore  contributes  to  the  success  of  the  corporation  with  which  he  is 
now  identified.  He  is  a  young  man  who  has  already  made  a  creditable  name  and 
place  for  himself,  as  he  was  born  in  Denver,  Colorado,  April  13,  1884,  a  son  of 
Frederick  R.  and  Elizabeth  (Lowber)  Coffin.  After  attending  the  public  schools 
of  his  native  city  to  the  age  of  nine  years  he  accompanied  his  parents  on  their 
removal  to  Cripple  Creek,  Colorado,  where  he  continued  his  education  until  he 
left  the  high  school  in   1899.     In  that  year  he  became  a  resident  of  Pasadena, 


250  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

California.  He  was  graduated  from  the  high  school  of  that  city  with  the  class  of 
1902.  He  afterward  attended  Harvard  University  at  Cambridge,  Massachusetts, 
where  he  completed  an  electrical  and  engineering  course  by  graduation  with  the 
class  of  1906. 

He  next  went  to  Boston  where  he  became  connected  with  the  well-known 
corporation  operating  under  the  name  of  the  Stone  &  Webster  Company,  one  of 
the  largest  engineering  corporations  in  the  country.  He  was  connected  with 
their  statistical  department  for  one  year  after  which  he  came  to  the  northwest 
and  as  an  electrical  engineer  entered  the  services  of  the  Whatcom  County  Rail- 
way and  Electric  Light  Company.  In  this  connection  he  won  advancement, 
becoming  manager  in  1910  and  when  the  business  was  taken  over  in  191 1  by  the 
Puget  Sound  Traction,  Light  and  Power  Company  he  continued  as  manager  for 
the  latter.  In  191 1  this  company  also  began  the  construction  of  a  suburban  line 
from  Bellingham  to  Sedro  WooUey,  Burlington  and  Mount  Vernon,  which  was 
completed  in  19 12  and  constitutes  the  northern" division  of  the  Pacific  Northwest 
Traction  Company,  of  which  Mr.  Coffin  is  also  the  manager.  It  will  thus  be 
seen  that  his  interests  are  of  an  important  character,  the  control  of  which  involves 
the  solution  of  many  intricate  and  complex  problems  but  in  every  regard  he  has 
been  found  adequate  to  the  situation. 

In  Cam.bridge,  Massachusetts,  on  the  4th  of  October,  1909,  ^Ir.  Coffin  was 
married  to  Miss  Fanny  M.  Johnson,  and  they  have  one  child,  John  Matchett,  now 
in  his  second  year.  Fraternally  Mr.  Coffin  is  an  Elk  and  he  is  also  well  known  in 
club  circles,  holding  membership  in  the  Bellingham  Country  Club,  the  Cougar 
Club  and  the  Kulshan  Club.  Fle  is  also  an  associate  member  of  the  American 
Institute  of  Electrical  Engineers  and  the  Harvard  Engineers  Society.  While 
his  interest  in  outside  activities  is  ever  maintained  at  an  even  balance,  the  greater 
part  of  his  time  and  energies  have  been  concentrated  upon  his  business  affairs 
which  have  been  of  constantly  growing  volume  and  importance  until  today  he 
is  most  active  in  connection  with  traction  interests,  holding  to  high  ideals  of 
service  but  at  the  same  time  economically  and  wisely  directing  the  conduct  of 
the  business,  thus  contributing  to  the  financial  success  of  the  corporation. 


CHARLES  J.  WARREN. 

Business  enterprise  at  Arlington  finds  a  worthy  representative  in  Charles  J. 
Warren,  a  dealer  in  men's  furnishing  goods,  in  which  connection  he  has  built 
up  a  business  of  substantial  proportions.  He  was  born  in  Chicago,  Illinois, 
January  i,  1875,  a  son  of  William  and  Anna  (McGlaughlin)  Warren,  who  were 
natives  of  England  and  Ireland  respectively.  In  childhood  they  came  to  America, 
making  their  way  at  once  to  Chicago,  but  their  marriage  was  celebrated  in 
Rochester,  New  York.  Later  in  life  Mr.  Warren  engaged  in  carpentering  and 
contract  work  and  in  1876  he  removed  to  Peoria.  Illinois,  where  he  continued 
contracting  up  to  the  time  of  his  retirement  from  active  business.  He  is  still 
living  in  that  city  at  the  age  of  seventy-nine  years  and  is  enjoying  a  rest  which 
he  has  truly  earned  and  richly  deserves.     His  wife  died   September   10,   1880, 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  251 

when  about  thirty-five  years  of  age.     In  their  family  were  six  children,  five  sons 
and  a  daughter,  of  whom  Charles  J.  was  the  fifth  in  order  of  birth. 

Through  the  period  of  his  boyhood  Charles  J.  Warren  attended  the  public 
schools  of  Peoria,  Illinois,  and  later  when  his  school  days  were  over  he  worked 
at  the  carpenter's  trade  in  that  city.  He  there  became  connected  with  the 
Mexican  Amolia  Soap  Company,  with  which  he  was  associated  for  five  years, 
when  he  returned  to  the  carpenter's  trade,  at  which  he  worked  for  two  years. 
In  1897  he  arrived  in  Seattle  and  entered  the  employ  of  the  Atlas  Lumber  Com- 
pany at  Lake  McMurray,  remaining  at  that  point  for  a  year  and  a  half.  His 
next  position  was  with  the  Hyatt  &  Bryan  Shingle  Company  of  Pilchuck,  with 
which  he  continued  for  four  and  a  half  years,  when  he  removed  to  Biglake, 
Washington,  where  he  was  closely  associated  with  the  shingle  business  for  a 
similar  period.  On  the  3d  of  July,  1905,  he  arrived  in  Arlington  and  accepted 
a  clerical  position  with  the  firm  of  Peterson  Brothers.  He  remained  in  that 
employ  for  seven  years  and  then  succeeded  R.  L.  Vaughn  in  the  men's  furnish- 
ing goods  business  at  Arlington  on  the  ist  of  x\ugust,  191 2.  He  has  since  con- 
centrated his  energies  upon  the  further  development  of  the  business,  which  he 
is  now  conducting  on  a  larger  scale  than  ever  before.  He  now  carries  a  large 
and  attractive  line  of  men's  furnishings,  keeping  thoroughly  up-to-date  in  rela- 
tion to  style  and  workmanship,  and  his  business  has  now  reached  gratifying 
proportions. 

On  the  6th  of  June,  1908,  Mr.  Warren  was  married  to  Miss  Mattie  Henrietta 
Hansen,  of  Stanwood,  Washington,  a  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Gabriel  Hansen, 
of  Stanwood,  where  they  still  reside.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Warren  have  become  the 
parents  of  two  daughters:  Geraldine  Edith,  who  was  born  in  August,  1910; 
and  Anna  Marion,  born  June  21,  191 5. 

For  ten  years  Mr.  Warren  has  been  chief  of  the  x\rlington  Fire  Department 
and  he  has  always  been  deeply  interested  in  everything  pertaining  to  public 
progress  and  improvement.  He  served  for  one  term  as  a  member  of  the  city 
council  of  Arlington  and  fraternally  he  is  connected  with  the  Elks  lodge  No. 
479,  the  Odd  Fellows  lodge  No.  127  and  the  United  Workmen  lodge  No.  84.  His 
political  endorsement  has  always  been  given  to  the  republican  party  since  age 
conferred  upon  him  the  right  of  franchise  and  he  does  everything  in  his  power 
to  ensure  its  growth  and  promote  its  success.  He  never  lightly  regards  the 
duties  of  citizenship  but  is  faithful  to  every  responsibility  devolving  upon  him 
and  those  who  know  him  entertain  for  him  warm  regard. 


ALBERT  M.  PINCKNEY. 

Forty-six  years  have  been  added  to  the  cycle  of  the  centuries  since  Albert 
M.  Pinckney  arrived  in  the  northwest  and  he  is  largely  familiar  with  the  Sound 
country.  He  reached  Blaine  when  there  were  only  about  twelve  families  here, 
when  there  were  no  mills  and  when  the  work  of  future  progress  and  develop- 
ment seemed  a  doubtful  proposition.  Fie  was  born  at  Ann  Arbor,  Michigan, 
December  i,  1849,  spent  some  time  in  South  Dakota  and  came  from  Sioux  City, 
Iowa,  to  Washington  in  1871.     The  early  settlers  here  took  up  claims  and  began 


252  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

improving  the  land  with  Httle  thought  of  utiHzing  the  timber  interests.  After 
ten  years  a  mill  was  built  in  order  to  provide  lumber  for  local  use.  There  were 
two  brothers  of  the  name  of  Clarke,  who  built  a  store  on  Semiahmoo  across  the 
bay  and  the  early  settlers  had  to  go  there  by  boat  to  do  their  trading.  The 
plant  of  the  Alaska  Pacific  Association  is  now  found  there.  In  the  years  imme- 
diately following  his  arrival  here  Mr.  Pinckney  was  employed  at  various  kinds  of 
work  but  later  he  concentrated  his  attention  upon  carpentering.  After  some 
time  spent  in  Whatcom  county  he  went  to  Westminster,  British  Columbia,  where 
he  was  employed  on  the  building  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railroad.  Later  he 
went  to  Seattle,  where  he  spent  sixteen  years,  devoting  most  of  that  period  to 
carpenter  work,  although  for  four  years  he  was  on  the  police  force  of  the  city,  to 
which  he  was  appointed  about  1886.  In  May,  1894,  he  returned  to  Blaine,  where 
he  has  since  made  his  home.  Here  he  resumed  carpentering,  also  began  dealing 
in  real  estate  and  improving  property,  and  as  the  years  have  gone  on  his  efforts 
have  brought  to  him  substantial  success.  He  built  a  number  of  residences  and 
has  thus  contributed  to  the  improvement  of  the  city.  He  is  a  brother  of  William 
Pinckney,  in  connection  with  whose  sketch  on  another  page  of  this  work  is 
given  the  familv  historv. 

The  military  service  of  Albert  M.  Pinckney  covers  active  duty  with  the 
militia  in  the  southern  part  of  Dakota  during  the  latter  part  of  the  Civil  war 
and  later  service  with  Company  D  of  the  Washington  National  Guard  while  in 
Seattle.  He  belongs  to  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and  for  years 
he  was  a  stalwart  republican  in  politics  but  more  recently  has  maintained  an 
independent  course.  He  has  served  on  the  police  force  of  Blaine  and  has  also 
been  a  member  of  the  city  council,  and  there  is  no  feature  of  public  life  here  in 
which  he  has  not  been  deeply  interested,  standing  at  all  times  for  progress  and 
upbuilding. 


ROBERT  POLSON. 


Robert  Poison,  manager  of  the  Poison  Logging  Company  of  Hoquiam,  is  the 
possessor  of  sterling  qualities  which  insure  him  the  warm  regard  of  his  friends 
and  the  high  respect  of  his  business  associates.  He  was  born  in  Nova  Scotia  in 
1866  and  there  spent  the  period  of  his  minority,  his  education  being  acquired  in 
the  public  schools  of  that  country.  In  1887,  when  twenty-one  years  of  age,  he 
arrived  in  Hoquiam  but  after  devoting  a  year  to  logging  there  he  removed  to 
British  Columbia,  where  he  also  spent  a  year.  Returning  to  Hoquiam,  he  operated 
a  logging  camp  for  his  brother,  Alexander  Poison,  for  a  year  and  subsequently 
engaged  in  the  logging  business  on  his  own  account  for  two  years.  He  after- 
ward joined  forces  with  his  brother,  Alexander  Poison,  and  became  manager  of 
the  Poison  Brothers  Logging  Company,  which  was  afterward  reorganized  under 
the  style  of  the  Poison  Logging  Company,  of  which  Robert  Poison  still  remains 
manager.  This  business  has  been  built  up  to  large  and  substantial  proportions 
under  his  direct  control  and  he  has  further  extended  the  scope  of  his  activities 
through  connection  with  other  business  interests,  being  now  president  of  the 
Eureka  Lumber  &  Shingle  Company,  president  of  the  Hoquiam  Timber  Company, 
and  also  a  stockholder  in  a  number  of  other  importanf  business  concerns  not  only 


EGBERT  POLSON 


lilllE  NEW  YORK 
PUBLIC  UBRARY 


ASTOK,    LENOX. 
TILDEN   FOUNPATION 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  255 

of  Hoqniam  but  of  the  Grays  Harbor  district.     His  judgment  is  discriminating, 
his  opinions  sound  and  his  enterprise  is  unfaltering. 

Mr.  Poison  is  a  republican  in  his  political  views  and  fraternally  is  connected 
with  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  He  is  a  man  of  splendid  physique. 
typical  of  the  big  spirit  within,  although  he  is  modest  and  unassuming,  claiming 
no  special  credit  for  what  he  has  accomplished  nor  what  he  has  done  for  the 
public.  His  generosity,  however,  has  been  manifest  in  his  support  of  many  plans 
and  measures  for  the  public  good  and  he  has  been  especially  active  in  promoting 
improvements  on  Grays  Harbor.  All  who  know  him  speak  of  him  in  terms  of 
warm  regard  and  he  enjoys  the  respect  and  goodwill  of  colleagues  and  con- 
temporaries. 


JACOB  FURTH. 


While  a  city  owes  its  existence,  its  upbuilding  and  improvement  not  to  a 
single  individual  but  to  the  united  efforts  of  many,  there  are  always  those 
who  are  leaders  in  the  public  life  and  whose  efforts  constitute  the  foundation 
upon  which  is  builded  much  of  the  material  prosperity  and  the  civic  advance- 
ment. To  this  class  belonged  Jacob  Furth,  who  was  long  prominently  known 
in  banking  circles  of  the  northwest  and  who  was  most  active  in  establishing 
and  promoting  the  street  railway  system  of  Seattle  and  the  interurban  systems 
of  this  section  of  the  country.  The  extent  and  importance  of  his  activities 
indeed,  made  him  one  of  the  valued  residents  of  the  northwest  and  his  record 
indicates  what  may  be  accomplished  by  the  young  man  of  foreign  birth  who 
seeks  the  opportunities  of  the  new  world  and  has  the  energy  and  determination 
to  improve  them.  But  while  Jacob  Furth  was  masterful,  commanding  and 
dynamic  in  his  business  affairs,  he  regarded  business  as  but  one  phase  of 
existence,  and  he  was  not  less  the  public-spirited  citizen  and  the  philanthropist 
than  he  was  the  successful  financier.  Indeed,  there  was  no  period  in  all  of  his 
career  when  business  so  occupied  his  attention  that  he  would  not  turn  to  listen 
to  some  plan  for  the  city's  betterment  or  some  tale  whereby  his  personal  aid 
was  sought  for  an  individual  or  an  organization.  He  is  therefore  entitled  to 
three-fold  prominence. 

Mr.  Furth  was  born  at  Schwihau,  Bohemia,  November  15,  1840,  a  son  of 
Lazar  and  Anna  (Popper)  Furth,  who  were  also  natives  of  that  land.  After 
attending  school  to  the  age  of  thirteen  years  Jacob  Furth  began  learning  the 
confectioner's  trade,  which  he  followed  for  three  years.  The  tales  which 
reached  him  concerning  the  opportunities  of  the  United  States  determined 
him  to  try  his  fortune  in  America  when  he  was  a  youth  of  sixteen,  and  with 
California  as  his  destination  he  bade  adieu  to  friends  and  native  land,  arriving 
in  San  Francisco  in  1856.  A  week  later  he  left  the  California  metropolis  for 
Nevada  City,  using  his  last  ten  dollars  in  making  the  trip.  Financial  conditions 
rendered  it  imperative  that  he  obtain  immediate  employment  and  he  accepted  a 
clerkship  in  a  clothing  store,  where  he  was  employed  mornings  and  evenings, 
while  the  daytime  was  improved  by  attendance  at  the  public  schools  for  a 
period  of  about  six  months.  He  thereby  acquainted  himself  with  the  English 
language,  after  which  he  put  aside  his  textbooks  and  devoted  all  of  his  atten- 


256  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

tion  to  business.  His  salary  was  originally  only  forty  dollars  per  month,  but 
he  proved  so  capable  and  faithful  that  promotion  came  to  him  rapidly  and  at 
the  end  of  three  years  he  was  receiving  three  hundred  dollars  per  month.  The 
cost  of  living  might  then,  as  now,  have  received  wide  comment,  but,  notwith- 
standing this,  he  saved  from  his  earnings  enough  to  enable  him  to  embark  in 
business  on  his  own  account  in  1862,  at  which  time  he  opened  a  clothing  and 
dry-goods  store,  which  he  conducted  for  eight  years.  In  1S70  he  removed  to 
Colusa,  where  he  established  a  general  mercantile  store,  of  which  he  remained 
proprietor  until  1882.  On  account  of  impaired  health  he  then  made  a  trip  to 
the  Puget  Sound  country  and,  although  Seattle  was  then  scarcely  more  than  a 
village,  he  recognized  something  of  its  opportunities  and  resolved  to  start  a 
bank  in  the  growing  little  town.  In  cooperation  with  San  Francisco  friends 
he  organized  the  Puget  Sound  National  Bank,  with  a  capital  of  fifty  thousand 
dollars,  and  took  charge  as  its  cashier.  In  the  first  few  months  of  its  existence 
he  also  acted  as  receiving  and  paying  teller  and  bookkeeper  and,  indeed,  was 
the  only  employe  of  the  bank  as  well  as  its  only  officer  in  Seattle.  It  was  not 
long,  however,  before  the  patronage  increased,  making  it  necessary  for  Mr. 
Furth  to  have  assistance,  and  within  a  few  years  the  capital  was  doubled  and 
has  since  been  increased  several  times  without  calling  upon  the  stockholders 
cO  put  up  any  additional  money,  the  earnings  of  the  bank  being  sufficient  to 
increase  the  capital  stock.  In  1893  Mr.  Furth  was  elected  to  the  presidency 
and  so  continued  until  its  consolidation  with  the  Seattle  National  Bank,  after 
which  he  became  chairman  of  the  board  of  directors  of  the  latter.  He  became 
recognized  as  one  of  the  foremost  factors  in  banking  circles  in  the  northwest, 
thoroughly  conversant  with  every  phase  of  the  business  and  capable  of  solvmg 
many  intricate  and  complex  financial  problems. 

Extending  his  efforts  to  other  fields,  he  organized  the  First  National  Bank 
of  Snohomish  in  1896  and  remained  one  of  its  stockholders  and  directors  until 
his  demise.  He  had  similar  connection  with  several  other  banks  in  different 
parts  of  the  state  and  his  efforts  proved  a  stimulus  in  securing  success  for  other 
business  interests.  In  1884  he  organized  the  California  Land  &  Stock  Company, 
owning  a  farm  of  nearly  fourteen  thousand  acres  in  Lincoln  county — one  of 
the  largest  in  the  state- — the  greater  part  of  it  being  devoted  to  wheat  growing, 
with  some  grazing  land  and  pasture  for  cattle  and  horses.  Of  this  company 
Mr.  Furth  continued  as  president  until  his  death.  Even  that  added  to  his 
financial  affairs  did  not  cover  the  scope  of  his  activities.  He  was  not  only  a 
student  of  conditions  affecting  his  individual  interests,  but  also  of  those  condi- 
tions affecting  the  city  and  growing  out  of  its  development  and  advancement. 
When  Seattle's  increasing  population  made  it  necessary  that  there  should  be 
street  railway  facihties  he  became  interested  in  the  subject  and  as  appliances 
for  the  operation  of  electric  railways  were  developed  and  perfected  his  energies 
were  more  and  more  largely  directed  to  the  building  and  management  of  urban 
and  interurban  electric  railway  systems.  The  year  1900  witnessed  the  organiza- 
tion of  the  Seattle  Electric  Company,  of  which  he  became  president  and  which  now 
operates  more  than  one  hundred  miles  of  track.  He  aided  in  organizing  and 
became  the  president  of  the  Puget  Sound  Electric  Railway  in  1902,  this  cor- 
poration controlling  the  line  between  Seattle  and  Tacoma  and  also  owning  the 
street  railways  in  Tacoma  and  most  of  the  other  cities  and  towns  of  the  Puget 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  257 

Sound  country.  He  was  also  president  of  the  Vulcan  Iron  Works.  Mr.  Furth 
made  further  investment  in  property,  including  much  Seattle  real  estate  and 
splendid  timber  lands  throughout  the  northwest.  His  sound  business  judgment 
and  sagacity  were  shown  in  the  excellent  income  which  resulted  from  his  invest- 
ments, making  him  one  of  the  foremost  men  in  wealth  as  well  as  in  business 
enterprise  in  the  northwest. 

Ere  leaving  California  Mr.  Furth  was  married  to  Miss  Lucy  A.  Dunten,  a 
native  of  Indiana,  and  they  became  the  parents  of  three  daughters :  Jane  E., 
Anna  F.,  and  Sidonia,  the  second  daughter  being  now  the  wife  of  Frederick  K. 
Struve.  The  family  is  widely  and  prominently  known  in  Seattle,  occupying  a 
position  of  leadership  in  social  circles. 

Mr.  Furth  was  a  valued  representative  of  the  Masonic  fraternity  and  of 
several  social  organizations.  He  became  a  Mason  in  Colusa  county,  California, 
in  1870,  and  while  there  residing  was  master  of  his  lodge.  He  was  also  a  Royal 
Arch  Mason  and  he  belonged  to  the  Rainier  Club,  the  Golf  Club,  the  Commercial 
Club  of  Seattle  and  the  Seattle  Chamber  of  Commerce.  He  was  president  of 
the  last  named  for  two  terms  and  his  identification  therewith  indicated  his  interest 
in  the  city's  upbuilding  and  business  development.  He  voted  with  the  republican 
party  and  sought  its  success  without  desiring  official  reward.  He  served,  how- 
ever, as  a  member  of  the  Seattle  city  council  from  1885  until  1891  and  in  that 
connection,  as  in  private  life,  labored  earnestly  for  the  benefit  and  upbuilding 
of  the  municipality.  Mr.  Furth  had  no  special  advantages  beyond  those  which 
others  enjoy,  but  he  worked  perhaps  a  little  harder,  a  little  more  persistently, 
studied  business  situations  and  questions  more  thoroughly  and  thus  was  able 
to  make  more  judicious  investments  and  to  direct  his  labors  more  intelligently, 
v/ith  the  result  that  he  won  place  among  the  most  prosperous  citizens  of  "the 
northwest,  ranking,  too,  with  those  who,  while  promoting  individual  prosperity, 
advance  the  general  welfare.  Indeed,  it  was  his  public  service  for  the  benefit 
of  his  city  and  his  kindliness  to  his  fellowmen  that  gained  him  a  firm  hold  upon 
the  affection  of  those  with  whom  he  was  brought  in  contact.  He  passed  away  in 
June,   1914,  and  the  Post-Intelligencer  wrote  of  him: 

"More  than  a  half  century  ago  a  Bohemian  boy  left  the  confectioner's  shop 
in  Buda-Pesth  where  he  was  employed  and  crossed  the  great  ocean  to  seek  his 
fortune  in  the  golden  west  of  America.  The  boy  brought  with  him  a  heritage 
of  virtues — sobriety,  thrift,  industry  and  honesty.  He  set  himself  a  high  ideal, 
and  throughout  a  long  life  which  saw  the  poor  boy  transformed  into  the  man 
of  riches  and  power,  throughout  a  life  which  put  into  his  hands  the  means  of 
working  great  good  or  great  evil,  Jacob  Furth  steadfastly  followed  that  high 
ideal,  practicing  in  private  as  in  public  the  simple  creed  of  honesty  and  kindli- 
ness, making  of  his  every  act  the  example  of  a  courageous,  intelligent  gentleman 
and  leader  of  men.  A  steadfastness  of  purpose,  a  judgment  unbiased  by  pre- 
judice, a  devout  belief  in  the  good  which  lies  in  all  human  kind,  a  faithful 
adherence  to  the  old-fashioned  virtues  which  are  the  foundation  of  our  civiliza- 
tion;  these  traits  characterized  Jacob  Furth,  molder  of  great  enterprises.  To 
his  own  family  Mr.  Furth  was  a  loving  husband  and  father.  To  his  business 
associates  and  subordinates  he  was  the  courteous  gentleman,  the  great  leader, 
quick  to  grasp  and  utilize  large  ideas,  the  fair-minded  judge  and  the  liberal 
employer.     His  charities  are  beyond  the  enumeration  of  even  those  closest  to 


258  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

him.  He  gave  publicly  on  every  worthy  occasion,  but  always  without  ostenta- 
tion. He  gave  privately  beyond  the  belief  of  even  his  closest  friends,  and 
always  aimed  to  make  his  giving  a  matter  of  substantial  aid  rather  than  charity 
in  the  narrower  sense  of  the  word. 

*Tn  the  community  which  he  served  so  many  years  Jacob  Furth  was  a  leader. 
His  counsel  served  time  and  again  to  guard  against  hasty  and  hot-headed  action, 
and  in  business  his  advice  was  regarded  as  invaluable.  Jacob  Furth  served 
Seattle  loyally  and  the  highest  ideal  actuated  him  in  questions  of  public  moment. 
From  the  day  he  chose  this  city  as  his  home  he  gave  liberally  of  time  and  influ- 
ence and  energy  to  build  up  the  community  about  him.  Possessed  of  great  power 
throughout  his  maturity,  Air.  Furth  strove  to  serve  honestly  and  faithfully  those 
who  put  their  faith  in  him  and  to  help  his  fellowmen  by  standing  for  the  things 
his  judgment  told  him  were  best  for  the  community.  The  figure  of  Jacob  Furth 
has  been  familiar  to  Seattle,  identified  with  great  afifairs  of  this  city  for  the  past 
thirty-one  years.  Of  medium  stature,  broad  of  shoulder  and  vigorous,  age 
seemed  to  encroach  little  upon  him.  His  rugged  face  spelled  power  and  self- 
mastery,  and  the  eyes,  which  looked  upon  the  world  from  behind  lenses,  were 
a  fascinating  reflection  of  the  mind  of  the  man,  at  times  kindly  and  smiling,  at 
times  commanding,  often  sympathetic.  Always  this  intelligent  gaze  was  leveled 
on  whomever  Mr.  Furth  addressed,  a  direct,  fearless  glance  which  appraised  and 
judged  rapidly  and  accurately. 

"Calm  self-control  was  the  most  striking  characteristic  of  the  banker.  When 
he  spoke  it  was  in  low  tones,  clear  and  forceful,  and  he  wasted  few  words.  He 
listened  much,  weighing  and  judging,  with  attention  riveted  on  the  matter  in 
hand.  His  decisions  were  given  rapidly,  but  without  haste.  Kindliness  was  a 
great  ingredient  of  Mr.  Furth's  character.  Throughout  his  life  he  displayed  a 
ready  sympathy  for  all  manner  and  conditions  of  people,  a  sympathy  which 
could  put  him  into  the  attitude  of  any  person  who  came  to  him  with  a  problem 
to  solve.  'Mr.  Furth  could  put  himself  in  the  place  of  a  boy  of  ten  who  had 
broken  his  skates  as  readily  as  he  could  understand  the  feelings  of  a  man  or 
woman  in  their  greatest  misfortune,'  said  one  who  knew  him  intimately.  Mem- 
bers of  his  family  never  hesitated  to  consult  him  even  during  business  hours 
on  the  most  commonplace  of  domestic  problems  and  always  found  him  ready 
to  drop  the  big  business  in  hand  to  understand  and  advise  in  their  perplexities. 
Strangers  of  any  degree  had  no  difficulty  in  gaining  an  audience  with  the  banker 
and  railway  president.  He  could  be  found  at  his  office  in  the  Puget  Sound 
National  Bank  (now  the  Seattle  National)  or  in  the  Electric  Company  office, 
in  the  Pioneer  building,  at  any  time  from  eight  until  six  o'clock,  and  the  request 
for  an  interview  was  sufficient  to  gain  audience. 

"As  a  man  of  great  power,  Mr.  Furth  was  perpetually  sought  by  men  with 
schemes — good,  bad  and  indififerent.  The  great  strength  of  the  man  who  deals 
in  millions,  who  finances  and  manages  great  enterprises  or  who  puts  his  capital 
out  at  interest  is  his  judgment  of  men.  Mr.  Furth  made  up  his  mind  promptly 
and  from  his  own  observation.  A  personal  interview  was  almost  invariably 
the  manner  by  which  the  banker  decided  on  a  course  of  action.  Once  he  had 
satisfied  himself  of  a  man's  honesty  he  stood  ready  to  back  his  opinion  with  all 
the  money  that  reason  justified  employing.  The  reputation  of  a  man  who  prac- 
tices  simple  honesiy,   who   serves   faithfully  and   well   those   who  trust  him   is 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  259 

the  greatest  gain  he  can  hope  from  life.  Such  a  reputation  Jacob  Furth  built 
up  in  his  handUng  of  large  affairs  in  this  city,  and  as  the  affairs  grew  in  import- 
ance the  name  and  reputation  of  the  man  grew  with  them  until  his  was  a 
figure  of  more  than  local  fame.  The  crown  of  this  phase  of  a  busy  career  came 
at  the  time  of  the  great  earthquake  and  fire  which  in  three  brief  days  devastated 
the  city  of  San  Francisco.  When  the  appeal  of  the  stricken  city  went  out  to  the 
world  hearts  were  touched  and  purses  opened  in  every  state  of  the  Union. 
There  was  a  tremendous  competition  to  get  into  the  stricken  city  those  things 
most  needed  by  the  homeless  thousands.  The  great  state  of  Massachusetts 
raised  a  million  dollars  by  public  subscription  and  sought  to  put  this  money  to 
its  best  use  for  the  benefit  of  the  fire  suff"erers.  Far  distant  from  the  disaster, 
it  was  decided  to  employ  some  agent  whose  honesty  and  judgment  would  best 
serve  the  purpose  of  the  subscribers.  Jacob  Furth,  the  banker,  thousands  of 
miles  away  in  Seattle,  was  the  man  chosen.  To  him  Massachusetts  handed  a 
million  dollars  with  the  simple  direction  that  it  be  spent  for  the  best  interests  of 
the  people  of  San  Francisco.  Here  was  a  task  to  try  the  greatest  man.  A 
million  dollars  is  a  tremendous  power  for  good  or  evil.  San  Francisco  was  in 
chaotic  state  and  it  was  difficult  indeed  to  learn  the  needs  of  the  city  or  how 
to  administer  to  them.  Mr.  Furth  undertook  the  trust  with  characteristic  calm- 
ness and  dispatch.  Relief  work  was  organized  rapidly  and  carried  out  system- 
atically. Ways  were  devised  of  doing  the  greatest  good  with  the  money  at  hand, 
and  the  things  most  needed  found  their  way  to  the  hands  of  those  most  in  want. 
As  simply  as  he  undertook  the  slightest  problem,  as  seriously  as  he  undertook 
the  biggest  transaction,  Jacob  Furth  accepted  the  trust  of  Massachusetts  and 
did  its  errand  of  mercy. 

"Some  months  later  Mr.  Furth  journeyed  to  Boston  to  make  an  account 
of  the  funds  in  his  care.  On  this  occasion  he  was  the  guest  of  honor  at  a 
banquet  complimentary  to  his  work  and  his  honesty,  a  banquet  at  which  the 
governor  of  Massachusetts,  the  mayor  of  Boston  and  many  noted  men  were 
present  to  thank  the  agent  of  a  state's  charity.  The  thanks  given  on  this  occa- 
sion by  speech  and  by  the  press  made  a  profound  impression  upon  Mr.  Furth. 
His  shrewd  appraisement  of  values  placed  this  incident,  where  it  belongs, 
amongst  the  greatest  moments  of  his  busy  life.  No  man  could  seek  greater 
honor  than  this  mighty  faith  in  his  ability  and  his  integrity." 

When  Jacob  Furth  passed  away  expressions  of  the  deepest  regret  were  heard 
on  every  hand,  and  men  who  guide  the  destinies  of  Seattle  along  the  lines  of  its 
greatest  activity,  professional,  commercial  and  municipal,  bore  testimony  to  his 
worth.  One  said:  "Seattle  has  lost  its  greatest  friend.  There  was  never  a 
man  in  this  city  who  could  have  accomplished  for  the  transportation  of  Seattle 
what  was  brought  about  by  Mr.  Furth,  but  since  all  this  was  known  best  to 
those  who  have  lived  here  for  long,  the  later  generations  arc  unaware  of  it." 
Another  said:  "Should  Mr.  Furth  in  his  lifetime  have  suddenly  withdrawn 
the  energy  and  money  he  put  into  this  city,  there  are  many  now  in  prosperous 
business  life  who  would  not  be  here.  He  was  a  strong  factor  in  commercial 
and  transportation  life,  such  as  has  been  given  to  few  cities  on  the  continent  to 
enjoy.  He  helped  many  men  in  public  life  whose  stories  were  a  sealed  book  to 
all  but  the  great  benefactor  who  has  passed  away,  for  he  never  told  of  them.  He 
helped   others,   not   from   a   mercenary   motive,   but  because  he   wanted   to   see 


260  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

everybody  prosper."  Seattle's  mayor  expressed  his  opinion  of  Mr.  Furth  in 
the  following  words :  "His  was  one  of  the  kindliest  personalities  I  ever  knew. 
He  did  much  for  Seattle  and  the  northwest  and  aided  immeasurably  in  its 
material  upbuilding."  J.  E.  Chilberg,  president  of  the  new  Chamber  of  Com- 
merce, spoke  of  Mr.  Furth  as  follows:  "Mr.  Furth  was  one  of  the  oldest 
and  most  active  members  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce.  In  his  capacity  as 
trustee  he  rendered  invaluable  service.  As  one  of  the  oldest  bankers  in  the 
city  he  was  progressive  and  generous,  always  ready  with  help  and  encourage- 
ment to  advance  the  business  interests  of  Seattle.  He  was  a  liberal  contributor 
to  all  funds  requiring  the  expenditure  of  money  for  the  benefit  of  the  com- 
munity. Mr.  Furth  occupied  a  position  unique  among  our  citizens.  As  a 
public-spirited  citizen  he  was  essentially  a  product  of  such  times,  and  the  early 
history  of  Seattle,  which  necessitated  cooperation  and  banded  business  men 
together  for  the  common  good.  He  was  one  of  a  class  of  citizens  now  passing 
from  us  that  no  future  condition  of  Seattle  will  or  need  develop.  Hundreds 
of  business  men  wall  mourn  the  loss  of  their  best  business  friend,  one  who  never 
failed  them  in  their  hour  of  need."  Judge  Thomas  Burke  wrote :  "Jacob 
Furth  was  an  unusual  man.  To  exceptional  ability  he  united  a  high  order  of 
public  spirit  and  great  kindness  of  heart.  It  would  be  difficult  to  overestimate 
his  work  in  the  upbuilding  of  Seattle.  His  time,  his  strength  and  his  money 
were  always  at  the  call  of  the  city.  In  his  many  years  of  residence  here  I 
doubt  if  he  was  ever  once  called  upon  for  help  or  leadership  in  any  public 
matter  in  which  he  failed  to  respond  and  respond  cheerfully,  liberally  and  with 
genuine  public  spirit.  He  was  a  man  of  sound  judgment  and  admirable  balance. 
He  never  lost  his  head  no  matter  how  great  the  exicitement  or  agitation  around 
him  was.  No  one  could  hold  fifteen  minutes  conversation  with  him  without 
feeling  that  he  was  talking  with  a  man  of  great  reserve  power.  He  was  a  man 
of  courage  and  wonderful  self-control.  He  kept  his  own  counsel,  whether  it 
related  to  the  transaction  of  his  large  and  varied  business  affairs  or  to  the 
numberless  acts  of  kindness  which  he  was  constantly  doing  for  others.  It  has 
fallen  to  the  lot  of  few  bankers,  in  this  or  any  other  community,  to  do  so  many 
acts  of  substantial  kindness  for  his  customers  and  for  others.  Many  a  man  in 
this  community  owes  a  debt  of  gratitude  to  Jacob  Furth  for  a  helping  hand  at  a 
critical  juncture  in  his  afifairs.  His  passing  from  the  scene 'of  action  here  is, 
and  will  continue  to  be  for  many  years  to  come,  a  serious  loss  to  Seattle." 

Love  of  family  was  one  of  the  most  marked  of  Jacob  Furth's  traits.  He 
enjoyed  having  his  immediate  kin  about  him  more  than  any  form  of  social 
entertainment.  Consulted  about  guest  lists  he  would  name  his  children  and 
consider  the  matter  closed.  So  certain  was  he  in  this  response  that  the  matter 
became  an  affectionate  joke  among  those  dear  to  him.  Not  even  Jacob  Furth'.s 
family  have  a  definite  idea  of  the  number  of  his  charitable  interests.  He  eav»^ 
promptly  and  freely  wherever  his  judgment  justified  giving.  At  times  he  wa<5 
imposed  upon,  but  he  bore  no  ill  will.  As  a  rule  his  interest  in  the  needy  was 
wisely  placed.  To  every  public  charity  of  worth  Mr.  Furth  gave  with  equal 
liberality.  His  name  has  headed  subscription  lists  innumerable  and  his  influence 
and  advice  have  solved  many  a  problem  of  moment  to  institutions  designed  to 
do  good.  But  the  great  test  of  charity  is  its  application  to  private  life.  Charity 
that  gives  is  fine,  but  how  much  finer  the  charity  that  rules  every  act !     Those 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  261 

who  knew  Mr.  Furth  intimately  are  agreed  he  did  not  bear  ill  will.  Men  who 
deceived  him  he  refused  to  deal  with,  but  for  them  he  could  always  find 
extenuation.  His  faculty  of  placing  himself  in  another's  situation  gave  him 
insight  and  sympathy  which  placed  values  in  their  true  light.  He  always  found 
time  to  express  understanding  of  and  sympathy  for  the  motives  of  those  who 
were  against  him. 

Jacob  Furth  came  to  Seattle  a  successful  man  in  the  prime  of  his  life.  He 
brought  a  splendid  heritage — rugged  health,  honesty,  sobriety,  thrift  and  a  keen 
judgment.  He  guided  himself  by  a  simple  creed,  striving  to  do  right  as  he  saw 
it,  to  understand  and  forgive  those  who  were  against  him,  to  be  just  and  to 
be  kind.  He  succeeded  as  few  men  may  hope  to  succeed.  Though  the  immigrant 
boy  rose  to  a  position  of  tremendous  power  and  responsibility,  he  served  well  and 
wisely,  and  in  his  success  he  gave  unsparingly  to  help  those  about  him  and  the 
community  of  which  he  was  proud.  The  passing  of  Jacob  Furth  is  the  passing 
of  a  figure  of  tremendous  interest,  it  marks  the  close  of  a  career  which  embodied 
those  virtues  that  may  well  serve  as  a  pattern  for  men.  A  father  has  been  lost 
to  his  family ;  a  loved  neighbor  has  been  taken  from  the  community ;  a  leader 
has  passed  from  the  city,  and  a  kindly,  generous  gentleman  has  gone  to  his 
reward. 


HON.  JAMES  ZYLSTRA. 

Hon.  James  Zylstra,  mayor  of  Coupeville,  manifests  in  his  official  service 
the  same  progressive  spirit  which  has  characterized  him  in  every  relation  of  life. 
As  a  member  of  the  bar  he  has  won  a  creditable  position  and  his  service  as 
mayor  was  preceded  by  excellent  work  in  the  office  of  county  prosecuting  attorney. 
He  came  to  America  from  Holland,  his  birth  having  occurred  in  Lewarden, 
July  3,  1877,  his  parents  being  Riekele  and  Lizzie  (Pool)  Zylstra,  who  are  also 
natives  of  that  country.  They  came  to  America  in  1880,  settling  first  in  South 
Dakota,  where  the  father  engaged  in  farming  until  1896.  He  then  removed  to 
Whidbey  Island,  where  he  has  engaged  in  the  real  estate  business  to  the  present 
time.  He  was  born  March  28,  1853,  so  that  he  is  now  sixty- four  years  of  age, 
while  his  wife  was  born  November  27,  1852.  In  their  family  were  nine  children, 
of  whom  one  died  in  infancy.  The  others  in  order  of  birth  are:  James  ;  Ralph  ; 
Ranee;  Rien  ;  Nicholas;  Mrs.  Taapke  Neenhanis  and  Mrs.  Augusta  Kiester,  who 
are  residents  of  Oak  Harbor,  Washington ;  and  Mrs.  Jessie  Deffries,  living  in 
Everett,  Washington. 

Brought  to  America  when  but  three  years  of  age,  James  Zylstra  attended 
the  public  schools  of  South  Dakota  and  afterward  became  a  student  in  the 
Puget  Sound  Academy.  In  1903  he  was  elected  county  clerk  of  Island  county, 
in  which  capacity  he  continued  for  four  years,  and  while  thus  engaged  he  devoted 
his  leisure  hours  to  the  study  of  law,  being  admitted  to  practice  in  1905.  He  was 
court  commissioner  for  two  months,  after  which  he  resigned  and  accepted  the 
appointment  of  prosecuting  attorney  of  Island  county.  To  that  position  he  was 
reelected  for  two  successive  terms,  at  the  close  of  which  time  he  entered  upon 
the  private  practice  of  law,  in  which  he  continued  for  two  years.     In   1914  he 


262  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

was  reelected  to  the  ofifice  of  prosecuting  attorney  and  is  still  the  incumbent  in 
that  position.  Being  recalled  to  the  office  is  proof  of  his  ability  and  loyalty 
in  the  position,  in  which  he  has  most  carefully  and  faithfully  safeguarded  the 
legal  interests  of  the  public.  In  1914  he  was  elected  mayor  of  Coupeville  and 
has  been  reelected  for  a  second  term,  again  receiving  the  endorsement  of  the 
public  for  faithful,  meritorious  and  efficient  service.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the 
county  school  board  and  the  cause  of  education  finds  in  him  a  stalwart  champion. 
He  is  a  progressive  republican  and  was  the  organizer  of  the  progressive  party 
in  Island  county. 

On  the  3d  of  August,  1904,  Mr.  Zylstra  was  married  to  IMiss  May  E. 
McCaslin,  of  Coupeville,  a  daughter  of  \\\  H.  and  Esther  Jane  (Dawson)  Mc- 
Caslin,  both  of  whom  are  now  deceased.  In  their  family  were  five  children; 
Earl  Leroy,  who  was  born  in  Coupeville  in  November,  1905 ;  Luella  May,  born  in 
June,  1907;  James  Elwin,  born  December  6,  1909;  Lillian  lone,  in  1910;  and 
Lysle  Wayne,  December  17.  1915.  The  three  older  children  are  all  in  school. 
Mr.  Zylstra  is  a  past  master  of  the  Masonic  fraternity  and  also  a  member  of  the 
Modern  Woodmen  of  America  and  is  in  hearty  sympathy  with  the  purposes  and 
spirit  of  these  organizations.  Along  the  lines  which  govern  honorable,  upright 
Tianhood  and  citizenship  he  has  guided  his  life,  and  the  course  which  he  has 
pursued  in  office  is  one  worthy  of  emulation  in  this  age  when  too  often  the 
opportunities  of  office  are  subverted  for  personal  gain  or  individual  aggrandize- 
ment. 


A.  J.  WEST. 


A.  J.  West  is  now  living  retired  in  Aberdeen,  enjoying  the  fruits  of  former 
well  conducted  business  interests.  In  fact  his  name  is  inseparably  interwoven 
with  the  history  of  his  city  and  state.  In  connection  with  the  former  he  owned 
and  operated  the  first  sawmill  in  Aberdeen  and  he  left  his  impress  upon  the 
annals  of  the  commonwealth  as  a  member  of  the  constitutional  convention.  More- 
over, it  was  Mr.  West  who  bought  the  first  ticket  from  St.  Paul,  Minnesota,  to 
the  coast  over  the  Northern  Pacific  Railroad.  He  was  born  in  Ireland  and  on 
coming  to  the  new  world  settled  in  Canada,  but  afterward  removed  to  Michigan, 
where  in  1863  he  enlisted  for  service  in  the  Civil  war.  He  went  to  the  front  as  a 
private  but  before  the  close  of  hostilities  rose  to  the  rank  of  captain.  He  par- 
ticipated in  many  hotly  contested  engagements  and  his  own  valor  and  loyalty 
inspired  and  encouraged  the  men  who  served  under  him.  He  was  married  in 
Michigan  to  Miss  Jennie  Robinson  on  the  12th  of  June.  1865,  soon  after  his 
return  from  the  army,  and  he  continued  his  residence  in  that  state  until,  attracted 
by  the  opportunities  of  the  northwest,  he  came  to  the  Pacific  coast. 

As  previously  stated,  Mr.  West  purchased  the  first  ticket  over  the  Northern 
Pacific,  traveling  by  rail  to  Portland,  thence  by  boat  to  Astoria  and  on  to  South 
Bend,  to  North  Cove  and  to  Westport,  finally  reaching  Grays  Harbor.  He 
arrived  in  Aberdeen  in  1883  and  built  the  first  sawmill  in  the  town.  The  site  of 
the  city  was  then  covered  with  a  dense  forest  growth  and  the  work  of  development 
had  scarcely  been  begun.     The  machinery  with  which  he  equipped  his  sawmill 


A.  J.  WEST 


> 


p.  THE  NEW  YORK     ■ 
PUBLIC  LIBRARY  j 

ASTOR,    LENOX 
TIL.DEN   FOUNDATi 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  265 

was  purchased  in  Michigan,  shipped  to  Portland  by  rail  and  thence  by  water  down 
the  Columbia  and  up  the  ocean  to  Grays  Harbor.  When  his  mill  was  equipped 
Mr.  West  began  its  operation  and  was- thus  actively  identified  with  the  lumber 
industry  until  1905,  when  he  sold  his  interests  in  the  mill  to  the  Slade  Company, 
after  which  he  established  a  mill  at  Junction  City,  it  being  now  a  large  and 
thriving  industry  of  that  place.  He  picked  out  his  first  mill  site  on  the  map  while 
still  living  in  Michigan  and  he  displayed  notable  prescience  and  foresight  in 
selecting  his  location.  When  preparing  to  come  west  he  had  all  of  his  furniture 
and  other  belongings  packed  and  loaded  on  a  car,  which  was  burned,  entailing 
considerable  loss,  but  undeterred  in  his  purpose,  he  eventually  reached  the  coast 
and  since  that  time  he  has  been  continuously  and  helpfully  associated  with  the 
upbuilding  and  development  of  Aberdeen.  He  was  active  in  connection  with 
Samuel  Benn  and  others  in  securing  the  building  of  the  Northern  Pacific  Railroad 
to  Grays  Harbor,  in  which  connection  he  furnished  the  labor  and  practically 
financed  the  work.  He  also  bought  the  right  of  way,  which  he  graded,  and  he 
sold  to  the  Chicago,  Milwaukee  &  St.  Paul  Railroad  its  present  right  of  way  to 
the  Harbor.  He  owned  one  of  the  first  grocery  stores  of  Aberdeen  and  following 
the  big  fire  of  1893  in  the  city  he  was  very  generous  in  his  distribution  of  groceries 
among  the  needy,  for  people  at  that  time  had  no  money  and  were  entirely  destitute 
of  supplies.  Mr.  West  was  at  that  crisis  in  Aberdeen's  history  mayor  of  the 
city  and  when  aid  was  ofifered  to  Aberdeen  by  neighboring  towns  he  refused  it 
and  through  his  efiforts  and  direction  Aberdeen  took  care  of  her  needy  ones  and, 
Phoenix-like,  the  city  rose  from  the  ashes.  •  ' 

It  was  Mr.  West  who  built  the  first  bridge  across  the  Whishkah  river  and 
also  the  Chehalis  river  at  Aberdeen.  He  was  also  interested  in  establishing  the 
first  electric  light  plant,  equipping  it  with  machinery,  its  location  being  the 
West  Mill. 

There  are  various  other  features  in  his  career  worthy  of  thoughtful  con- 
sideration. Throughout  the  entire  period  of  his  residence  in  the  northwest  he  has 
been  actuated  by  a  spirit  of  devotion  to  the  public  good  and  he  served  as  a 
delegate  to  the  state  constitutional  convention  at  Olympia  when  it  was  necessary 
to  make  the  trip  to  the  capital  city  by  boat  and  stage.  Twice  he  served  as  mayor 
of  Aberdeen  and  in  his  official  connection  put  forth  every  effort  to  promote  the 
city's  upbuilding  and  development  along  substantial  lines,  ever  looking  beyond 
the  exigencies  of  the  moment  to  the  possibilities  of  the  future.  He  was  likewise 
a  member  of  the  school  board  and  the  cause  of  education  found  in  him  a  stalwart 
champion.  He  has  been  a  generous  contributor  to  every  movement  calculated  to 
benefit  the  city  and  in  fact  has  been  the  leading  spirit  in  many  projects  planned 
for  Aberdeen's  upbuilding.  In  all  of  his  business  connections  Mr.  West  has 
followed  the  axiom  that  honesty  is  the  best  policy  and  something  more  of  his 
business  career  is  indicated  in  his  relations  to  his  employes,  manifest  in  the  fact 
that  his  chief  engineer  in  the  present  West  mill  was  with  him  in  Michigan,  came 
to  the  coast  with  him  and  has  since  been  in  his  employ,  covering  a  period  of  forty 
years  in  all. 

To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  W^est  were  born  two  sons:  W.  A.,  who  is  now  secretary 
and  manager  of  the  mill ;  and  E.  R.,  who  is  sales  manager.  The  parents  cele- 
brated their  golden  wedding  in  June,  191 5,  a  most  notable  occasion  for  all  who 
were  present.    They  are  now  living  retired  in  a  comfortable  environment,  for  the 

Vol.  TI— 14  » 


266  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

intelligently  directed  business  activity  of  Mr.  West  supplied  them  with  a  very 
substantial  competence  and  his  present  rest  is  well  deserved,  while  the  regard 
and  honor  entertained  for  him  by  his  fellow  townsmen  is  justly  merited.  He  has 
been  a  prominent  factor  in  the  growth  of  Masonry  in  Aberdeen  and  in  fact  was 
the  founder  of  the  first  lodge  in  the  city.  He  also  furnished  it  with  a  place  of 
meeting,  giving  the  lodge  the  use  of  the  upper  floor  of  a  storehouse  which  stood 
just  across  the  bridge  on  East  Heron  street  for  the  nominal  rental  of  one  dollar 
for  as  long  a  period  as  they  desired  to  hold  meetings  there.  On  the  14th  of 
February,  191 3,  when  the  lodge  celebrated  its  twenty-fifth  anniversary,  Mr.  West 
was  presented  with  a  diploma  of  life  membership,  an  honor  rarely  conferred,  and 
indicating  the  place  of  distinction  which  he  holds  in  the  local  circles  of  the  order. 
He  has  filled  all  the  chairs  of  the  lodge  and  has  at  all  times  been  an  exemplary 
representative  of  the  craft. 


W.  A.  WEST. 


W.  A.  West,  now  managing  the  West  lumber  interests  in  Aberdeen,  was  born 
in  Michigan  but  was  only  eight  weeks  old  when  brought  by  his  parents,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  A.  J.  West,  to  Washington.  He  attended  the  schools  of  Aberdeen,  passing 
through  consecutive  grades  to  the  high  school,  and  during  vacation  periods  in  his 
boyhood  he  spent  his  time  in  the  mill,  gradually  mastering  the  business  in 
principle  and  detail  and  working  his  way  upward  to  his  present  position,  that  of 
secretary  and  manager.  He  is  a  worthy  son  of  a  worthy  sire  and  has  followed  in 
the  business  footsteps  of  his  father  in  every  particular,  displaying  the  same  spirit 
of  enterprise  and  the  same  principles  of  integrity  and  honor  in  all  his  business 
relations. 

On  the  27th  of  June,  1907,  W.  A.  West  was  married  to  ]\Iiss  Gerda  Knudson, 
a  childhood  playmate  of  Mr.  West.  She  is  a  daughter  of  Charles  Knudson,  one 
of  Aberdeen's  pioneers,  who  later  returned  to  Norway  after  losing  his  wife  and 
now  resides  in  that  country.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  West  have  two  children :  Arnold  J., 
in  school ;  and  Kathryn.  The  name  of  West  has  long  figured  prominently  in 
connection  with  the  various  phases  of  Aberdeen's  existence  and  development  and 
stands  as  a  synonym  for  successful  activity  in  connection  with  the  lumber  industry. 


GUS  HENSLER. 


Gus  Hensler,  who  is  engaged  in  the  real  estate  and  insurance  business  at 
Anacortes,  was  born  in  Audrain  county,  Missouri,  in  1864,  his  parents  being 
Ernest  Charles  and  Catherine  (Lang)  Hensler.  The  father,  a  farmer  by  occu- 
pation, came  to  the  west  in  1892  and  is  now  deceased,  but  the  mother  is  still 
living. 

Gus  Hensler  acquired  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Fayette,  Mis- 
souri, and  in  Central  College,  which  is  conducted  under  the  auspices  of  the 
Methodist  Episcopal  church.     He  has  also  learned  many  valuable  lessons  in  the 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  267 

school  of  experience  and  has  thus  continually  added  to  his  knowledge  and  effi- 
ciency. When  but  fifteen  years  of  age  he  became  a  cattle  buyer  and  followed 
that  business  for  a  time  in  New  Mexico,  but  in  1889  he  determined  to  try  his 
fortune  in  the  northwest  and  in  July  of  that  year  arrived  in  Washington.  He 
took  up  a  preemption  claim  in  Skagit  county  not  far  from  Anacortes  and  in  due 
time  proved  up  on  the  property.  He  was  afterward  associated  with  a  Mr.  N.  F. 
McNaught  in  a  land  improvement  company  until  1893,  when  he  was  called  to 
public  office,  serving  for  a  period  of  four  years  as  city  clerk  of  Anacortes.  On 
retiring  from  that  position  he  turned  his  attention  to  the  real  estate  and  insur- 
ance business,  in  which  he  has  since  been  actively  engaged.  Entering  into  a 
partnership,  he  formed  a  light  and  water  company,  but  at  the  end  of  about  four 
years  sold  out  to  Douglass  Allmond  and  since  then  has  given  his  undivided  atten- 
tion to  insurance  and  real  estate. 

In  1890  Mr.  Hensler  was  married  to  Miss  Anna  Barker,  who  died  Septem- 
ber 7,  191 1,  and  on  the  12th  of  December,  1913,  he  wedded  Hessie  E.  Hastings. 
In  politics  he  maintains  an  independent  course,  nor  has  he  ever  been  a  politician 
in  the  sense  of  office  seeking,  although  he  served  in  1897-8  as  county  commis- 
sioner. In  Masonry  he  has  taken  the  degrees  of  the  lodge  and  he  is  also  identi- 
fied with  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  He  belongs  to  the  Chamber 
of  Commerce,  in  which  he  has  served  as  a  director.  Those  who  know  him,  and 
he  has  a  wide  acquaintance,  recognize  in  him  a  progressive  and  enterprising 
business  man  and  a  substantial  citizen. 


THOMAS  R.  WATERS. 


Thomas  R.  Waters,  who  is  practicing  at  the  Bellingham  bar  and  has  through- 
out his  professional  career  displayed  the  qualities  indispensable  to  success — a 
keen,  rapid,  logical  mind  plus  the  business  sense  and  the  ready  capacity  for 
hard  work— was  born  in  New  Madrid,  Missouri,  February  8,  1881,  a  son  of 
Louis  Allen  and  Ella  Waters.  The  father  was  also  a  native  of  New  Madrid 
and  after  completing  a  course  in  the  public  schools  there  entered  the  Pennsyl- 
vania University  at  Philadelphia  and  later  became  a  student  in  the  Louisville 
(Kentucky)  Medical  College,  from  which  he  was  graduated.  He  then  returned 
to  his  native  city,  where  he  entered  upon  the  practice  of  medicine,  in  which  he 
continued  successfully  until  his  death,  in  the  spring  of  1886. 

Thomas  R.  Waters  attended  the  public  and  high  schools  of  Louisville, 
Kentucky,  until  he  reached  the  age  of  sixteen  years,  when  he  entered  the  Louis- 
ville Military  In.stitute,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  i<;oo.  Determined 
upon  the  practice  of  law  as  a  life  work,  he  later  matriculated  in  the  Slate  L'ni- 
versity  of  Michigan  and  was  graduated  therefrom  with  the  degree  of  LI..  B. 
in  1905.  He  then  went  to  Spokane  to  assist  on  a  case,  that  of  the  Peoples  I'nited 
Church  of  Spokane  versus  Mclnturff,  which  occupied  him  for  two  months.  At 
the  expiration  of  that  period  he  came  to  Bellingham.  where  he  entered  into  a 
partnership  with  Frank  W.  Radley  for  the  practice  of  law  under  the  firm  name 
of  Waters  &  Radley.  After  two  years  this  association  was  di.'=;continued  and 
Mr.  Waters  entered  into  partnership  with  George  Downer  uiuUr  tlu'  lirni  name 


268  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

of  Waters  &  Downer  and  when  their  interests  were  dissolved  he  became  a 
partner  of  Judge  Nederer,  who  is  now  United  States  district  judge  at  Seattle. 
The  firm  of  Nederer  &  Waters  existed  until  August,  191 3,  when,  following  the 
appointment  of  the  senior  partner  to  the  bench,  Mr.  W'aters  entered  upon  an 
independent  practice  and  has  since  been  alone.  He  possesses  eloquence  of  lan- 
guage, and  a  strong  personality,  a  thorough  grasp  of  the  law  and  ability  to 
accurately  apply  its  principles  combined  with  an  earnest,  dignified  manner  and 
marked  strength  of  character  are  factors  in  his  efifectiveness  as  an  advocate. 

In  Louisville,  Kentucky,  on  the  first  of  June,  1908,  Mr.  \\'aters  was  married 
to  Miss  Elvira  Batman  and  they  have  become  the  parents  of  three  children : 
Thomas  R.,  Jr. ;  Suzanne ;  and  Louis  Allen.  Fraternally  Mr.  Waters  is  con- 
nected with  the  Elks  and  Knights  of  Columbus  and  his  political  belief  and  alle- 
giance are  indicated  in  the  fact  that  he  is  now  secretary  of  the  Woodrow  Wilson 
League.     If  he  espouses  a  cause  he  becomes  one  of  its  active  supporters. 


ELDRIDGE  WHEELER. 

Eldridge  Wheeler,  superintendent  of  schools  at  Montesano,  Washington,  was 
born  ]\rarch  2^,  1865.  at  Drakesville,  Davis  county,  Iowa,  a  son  of  Frederick 
and  Margaret  (Edwards)  Wheeler,  the  former  a  native  of  the  state  of  New 
York  and  the  latter  of  Tennessee.  In  the  paternal  line  he  is  descended  from 
early  Puritans  of  Massachusetts.  His  education  was  completed  in  the  Southern 
Iowa  Normal  School  and,  taking  up  the  profession  of  teaching,  he  has  been 
active  in  that  field  since  1885.  He  began  as  a  teacher  in  the  rural  schools  of 
Iowa  and  afterward  was  thus  connected  with  the  schools  of  Nebraska.  In  1891 
he  came  to  Washington  and  after  teaching  for  a  time  in  rural  and  village  schools 
he  was  made  superintendent  of  the  city  schools  of  Montesano,  in  which  posi- 
tion he  has  remained  for  twenty-two  years,  a  most  notable  record,  indicative 
of  superior  service  characterized  by  most  progressive  methods.  At  one  time 
he  was  also  county  superintendent  of  the  schools  of  Grays  Harbor  county.  He 
has  also  been  a  factor  in  the  promotion  of  local  industries  and  a  stockholder  in 
several  local  companies. 

In  Pawnee  City,  Nebraska,  on  the  20th  of  March,  1893,  Professor  Wheeler 
was  married  to  Miss  Sadie  Scott,  a  daughter  of  the  Hon.  R.  T.  Scott,  of  that 
place,  and  a  representative  of  one  of  the  pioneer  families  of  southeastern  Neb- 
raska. Robert  Fred  Wheeler,  fifteen  years  of  age,  is  their  only  living  child. 
A  daughter,  Imogene,  died  January  8,   191 5,  at  the  age  of  seventeen  years. 

Professor  Wheeler  has  been  a  lifelong  democrat.  Aside  from  serving  as 
county  superintendent  of  schools  in  1907  and  1908  he  was  a  candidate  on  the 
democratic  ticket  for  state  superintendent  of  public  instruction  in  the  latter  year 
and  he  served  as  mayor  of  Montesano  for  three  terms,  from  1912  to  1914  in- 
clusive. In  1912  he  was  a  delegate  to  the  national  democratic  convention  held 
in  Baltimore,  and  was  among  those  who  advocated  the  nomination  of  Woodrow 
Wilson.  In  1913  he  was  appointed  a  member  of  the  board  of  regents  of  the 
University  of  Washington  and  in  191 5  was  reappointed  to  that  position  for  a 
six  years'  term  which  will  expire  in   1921.     Fraternally  he  is  also  well  known, 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  269 

being  connected  with  the  Masons,  the  Knights  of  Pythias,  the  Maccabees,  the 
United  Workmen  and  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  America.  He  stands  for  hieh 
ideals  in  his  profession  and  his  work  constitutes  an  important  chapter  in  the 
record  of  educational  progress  in  Washington. 


WILLIAM  ASBURY  JOHNSON. 

William  Asbury  Johnson,  an  active  member  of  the  Everett  bar,  now  filling 
the  office  of  city  attorney,  was  born  September  12,  1873,  in  Orono,  Maine.  His 
father,  Charles  W.  Johnson,  also  a  native  of  that  state,  is  a  representative  of  one 
of  the  old  families  of  Maine  that  was  established  at  Kittery  at  an  early  day. 
The  founder  of  the  American  branch  of  the  family  was  James  Johnson,  who 
came  from  England  and  devoted  his  life  to  the  work  of  a  carpenter  and  joiner. 
One  of  the  ancestors  of  our  subject,  Jesse  Davis,  fought  in  the  Revolutionary 
war,  aiding  the  colonists  in  their  struggle  for  independence.  He  was  a  physician 
and  surgeon  and  became  related  by  marriage  to  the  Johnson  family,  his  daughter, 
Phoebe  Davis,  becoming  the  wife  of  Elisha  G.  Johnson,  the  great-grandfather 
of  William  A.  Johnson  of  Everett.  Charles  W.  Johnson,  the  father,  was  a  mill 
man  and  was  identified  with  the  lumber  trade  during  the  greater  part  of  his 
life.  In  the  fall  of  191 5  he  became  a  resident  of  Everett,  where  he  is  now  living 
retired.  At  his  home  in  Orono,  Maine,  he  was  quite  active  in  community  affairs 
and  filled  various  local  offices.  In  politics  he  is  a  stanch  democrat  and  in  religious 
faith  is  a  Universalist.  He  married  Clara  Lancaster,  a  native  of  Maxfield, 
Maine,  and  a  daughter  of  John  Lancaster,  representative  of  an  old  Maine  family 
of  English  descent.  Her  death  occurred  in  Orono,  Maine,  when  she  was  thirty- 
three  years  of  age. 

Their  only  child,  William  Asbury  Johnson,  was  educated  in  the  public  schools 
of  Orono  and  in  the  University  of  Maine,  from  which  he  was  graduated  with  the 
LL.  R.  degree  in  1905,  while  in  1908  his  alma  mater  conferred  upon  him  the 
Master  of  Arts  degree.  From  the  age  of  fifteen  years  he  had  been  variously 
employed  as  a  sailor,  as  an  engineer  and  in  clerical  capacities,  including  that  of 
bookkeeper.  It  was  by  means  of  his  earnings  gained  in  these  different  ways  that 
he  was  able  to  pursue  his  university  course.  Not  having  a  college  diploma,  the 
law  made  it  necessary  that  he  pass  the  state  bar  examination  and  practice  for 
a  time  before  the  law  school  could  confer  a  degree  upon  him.  In  February,  1905, 
he  was  admitted  to  practice  in  Maine  and  in  the  following  June  he  was  grad- 
uated. He  took  up  the  work  of  the  profession  in  Milo,  Maine,  where  he 
remained  for  two  years  and  then  removed  to  Rangor.  Maine,  where  he  also 
spent  two  years.  He  then  left  the  Atlantic  coast  for  the  far  west  and  located 
at  Poison,  Montana,  in  1909,  upon  the  opening  of  the  Flathead  reservation. 
There  he  continued  until  August,  1911,  at  which  time  he  removed  to  Everett, 
arriving  in  that  city  a  comparative  stranger.  He  at  once  entered  upon  active 
practice,  in  which  he  has  since  continued  most  successfully.  He  displays  marked 
ability  in  his  chosen  field.  Lack  of  opportunities  is  ofttimes  an  incentive  to 
ambition  and  energy.  The  man  who  must  carve  out  his  own  way  comes  to  recog- 
nize the  value  of  opportunities  and  of  effort  and  makes  each  move  count  and 


270  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

utilizes  each  hour  in  the  best  possible  way.  Thrown  upon  his  own  resources  at 
an  early  age,  Air.  Johnson  has  advanced  steadily  step  by  step  by  reason  of  merit 
and  capability  and  is  now  recognized  as  an  able  lawyer  of  Everett,  where  in 
January,  1916,  he  was  elected  to  the  office  of  city  attorney. 

On  the  i6th  of  November,  1914,  Air.  Johnson  was  married  to  Miss  Anna 
Rollins,  a  native  of  Maine  and  a  daughter  of  Cyrus  C.  and  Abbie  (Fox) 
Rollins,  representatives  of  an  old  family  of  the  Pine  Tree  state,  where  they  still 
reside.  In  politics  Mr.  Johnson  is  a  republican  and  is  one  of  the  active  workers 
of  his  party  in  Everett.  He  has  taken  the  various  degrees  in  the  Independent 
Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and  also  various  degrees  in  Masonry  and  is  a  past  master 
of  the  Masonic  lodge  of  Milo,  Maine.  He  likewise  belongs  to  the  Benevolent 
Protective  Order  of  Elks  at  Everett,  to  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  the  Red 
Men.  He  has  membership  in  the  Commercial  Club  and  cooperates  in  all  of  its 
well  devised  plans  for  the  improvement  and  upbuilding  of  the  city.  His  religious 
faith  is  that  of  the  Universalist  church.  He  devotes  all  of  his  time  and  atten- 
tion to  his  law  practice  and  he  is  a  member  of  the  Snohomish  County  Bar  Asso- 
ciation. In  his  boyhood  it  was  his  ambition  to  become  a  civil  engineer,  but  on 
one  occasion  he  was  required  to  make  a  talk  before  the  Maine  legislature  when 
evidence  was  being  given  before  Judge  Foster  of  Augusta,  Maine,  who  after 
hearing  Mr.  Johnson  remarked  to  him  that  he  had  missed  his  calling,  that  he 
should  have  studied  law  instead  of  engineering  and  believed  that  he  would  make 
a  brilliant  lawyer.  This  was  the  incentive  which  directed  him  to  prepare  for 
the  bar  and  in  a  calling  where  advancement  depends  entirely  upon  individual 
merit  he  is  making  steady  progress. 


ELMER  E.  HEMRICK. 


Elmer  E.  Hemrick,  manager  of  the  Aberdeen  Brewing  Company  and  vice 
president  of  the  Security  Savings  &  Loan  Association,  was  born  in  Alma,  Wis- 
consin, in  1890,  but  with  the  early  removal  of  the  family  to  Seattle  acquired  his 
education  in  the  public  schools  of  that  city  and  in  Wilson's  Modern  Business 
College.  He  is  a  son  of  Alvin  Hemrick,  of  the  Hemrick  Brothers  Brewing 
Company  of  Seattle. 

In  1910  Elmer  E.  Hemrick  removed  to  Aberdeen  to  fill  the  position  of  assistant 
manager  of  the  Aberdeen  Brewing  Company,  which  had  established  business 
there  in  1902.  Later  he  was  advanced  to  the  position  of  manager  and  so  con- 
tinues. The  company  built  a  plant  there,  installing  modern  machinery  and  equip- 
ment, and  has  since  conducted  a  progressive  and  profitable  brewing  business. 
Since  the  ist  of  January,  1916.  they  have  been  manufacturing  non-alcoholic  beer. 
The  first  officers  of  the  company  were  Alvin  Hemrick,  president ;  E.  J.  Quaver, 
secretary  and  manager ;  and  H.  L.  Smith,  treasurer.  After  several  years  a 
change  occurred  in  the  personnel  of  the  company,  for  while  Alvin  Hemrick 
remained  as  president,  Elmer  E.  Hemrick  became  vice  president  and  manager, 
and  Paul  F.  Glaser  secretary  and  treasurer.  The  company  also  installed  an  ice 
plant  and  with  it  consolidated  the  two  other  ice  plants  of  the  city,  so  that  they 
now  supply  all  the  ice  for  Aberdeen  and  Grays  Harbor. 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  271 

Elmer  E.  Hemrick  does  not  confine  his  attention  alone  to  this  business,  for 
in  February,  1915,  he  became  one  of  the  organizers  of  the  Surf  Packing  Com- 
pany, with  Alvin  Hemrick  as  president ;  Elmer  E.  Hemrick,  vice  president  and 
manager;  and  Paul  F.  Glaser  secretary  and  treasurer.  This  company  was  formed 
for  the  purpose  of  packing  sea  foods,  which  they  put  upon  the  market  under 
the  name  of  the  Hemrick  brand  of  clams  and  clam  nectar.  They  erected  a 
building  ninety  by  one  hundred  and  thirty  feet,  installed  all  modern  machinery 
and  electric  motive  power  and  they  have  a  steam  plant  for  cooking.  They  employ 
thirty-five  people  and  the  capacity  is  thirty  thousand  cases  each  season.  In  the 
brewery  fifteen  people  are  employed  and  in  addition  to  his  interests  in  those 
connections  Elmer  E.  Hemrick  became  one  of  the  organizers  and  is  the  vice 
president  of  the  Security  Savings  &  Loan  Association. 

He  is  well  known  in  fraternal  relations,  being  a  member  of  the  Benevolent 
Protective  Order  of  Elks,  the  Eagles,  the  Red  Men  and  the  Foresters.  He  has 
a  wide  acquaintance  and  his  social  qualities  have  gained  him  warm  friendship, 
while  his  business  enterprise  has  made  him  widely  known. 


THOMAS  J.  TANNER. 


Thomas  J.  Tanner,  who  is  widely  known  as  one  of  Port  Townsend's  leading 
and  highly  respected  citizens,  has  been  actively  engaged  in  business  there  for 
more  than  three  decades  as  proprietor  of  the  Port  Townsend  Soda  Water  Works. 
His  birth  occurred  in  Wilts  county,  England,  in  April,  1845,  his  parents  being 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  John  Tanner,  who  spent  their  entire  lives  in  that  country,  passing 
away  when  their  son  Thomas  was  still  a  child. 

In  the  acquirement  of  an  education  Thomas  J.  Tanner  attended  the  schools 
of  England  and  after  putting  aside  his  textbooks  secured  a  position  as  deHvery 
boy  in  a  grocery  store.  Subsequently  he  made  his  way  to  Newport,  New  South 
Wales,  and  there  worked  at  gardening  until  he  shipped  as  a  cabin  boy,  and  during 
the  succeeding  three  years  he  sailed  to  all  ports  of  the  world.  On  the  expiration 
of  that  period  he  came  to  Utsaladdy,  Washington,  in  a  British  ship  and,  abandon- 
ing seafaring  life,  worked  in  the  logging  camps  on  Whidbey  Island  and  in  the 
sawmills  at  Port  Discovery  and  Port  Gamble.  He  also  worked  on  ranches  and 
proved  up  on  a  homestead  in  Jcfl^erson  county,  where  he  was  engaged  in  ranch- 
ing for  five  years.  He  afterward  spent  two  years  in  the  Gassier  mines  of 
British  Columbia  and  then  returned  to  Port  Townsend,  where  he  worked  at  odd 
jobs  and  later  established  a  wood  sawing  plant  which  he  conducted  for  a  year. 
In  1886  he  bought  out  the  soda  water  business  which  he  has  conducted  con- 
tinuously throughout  the  past  thirty-one  years,  being  accorded  a  liberal  and 
growing  patronage  that  has  brought  him  well  deserved  prosperity. 

On  the  1st  of  January,  1887,  in  Brooklyn,  New  York,  Mr.  Tanner  was  united 
in  marriage  to  Miss  Margaret  Logue,  by  whom  he  had  four  children,  three  of 
whom  still  survive,  namely:  Thomas  J.,  who  was  bom  at  Port  Townsend  in  1888 
and  now  resides  in  Spokane,  Washington  ;  Margaret  V.,  who  was  born  at  Port 
Townsend  in  1889,  is  a  graduate  of  the  Holy  Name  Academy  and  now  well 
known  in  musical  circles;  and  Harry  J.,  whose  birth  occurred  at  Port  Townsend 


272  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

in  1900  and  who  is  now  associated  with  his  father  in  business.     The  daughter 
Minnie  is  deceased. 

Mr.  Tanner  gives  his  political  allegiance  to  the  republican  party  and  has 
served  as  councilman  for  the  past  twenty  years,  while  for  four  years,  from 
1900  to  1903  inclusive,  he  held  the  office  of  county  treasurer.  Fraternally  he  is 
connected  with  the  Red  Men,  which  order  he  joined  many  years  ago,  and  his 
religious  faith  is  indicated  by  his  membership  in  the  Roman  Catholic  church. 
His  life  has  been  upright  and  honorable  in  every  relation  and  the  success  which 
he  now  enjoys  is  directly  attributable  to  his  own  industry,  energy  and  capability. 
He  has  long  been  a  man  of  influence  in  his  community  and  is  numbered  among 
the  honored  pioneer  citizens  of  the  state. 


H.  W.  MacPHAIL. 


H.  W.  MacPhail,  president  of  the  Willapa  Harbor  State  Bank  of  Raymond, 
was  born  in  Cass  City,  Michigan,  April  i,  1880,  a  son  of  Curtis  W.  MacPhail, 
who  was  born  at  Caro,  Michigan,  in  1857.  In  1879,  when  twenty-two  years  of 
age,  he  married  Miss  Matilda  Pervis,  a  native  of  Canada,  who  died  in  1885. 
In  their  family  were  two  sons,  H.  W.  and  Leland  S.,  the  latter  a  resident  of 
Nashville,  Tennessee.  The  father  engaged  in  general  merchandising  during  early 
manhood  but  in  1880  turned  his  attention  to  banking,  establishing  the  first  bank 
in  Cass  City,  Michigan.  He  is  still  actively  identified  with  that  business  through- 
out the  state,  making  his  home  at  Ludington. 

After  acquiring  his  education  in  the  public  schools  and  a  business  college, 
H.  W.  MacPhail  became  his  father's  associate  in  the  banking  business  and 
received  his  initial  business  training  and  experience  in  the  fourteen  banking  insti- 
tutions which  his  father  had  established  in  Michigan.  Later,  with  the  desire  to 
test  his  ability,  he  came  to  the  west,  hoping  to  find  still  better  opportunities  in 
this  great  and  growing  section  of  the  country.  Arriving  in  Raymond  in  1908, 
he  organized  the  Willapa  Harbor  State  Bank,  of  which  he  at  first  became  cashier. 
Later  he  was  elected  to  the  vice  presidency  and  in  1914  was  chosen  for  the  head 
of  the  institution,  since  which  time  he  has  directed  its  policy  as  its  president. 
The  other  officers  are :  Ralph  Burnside,  vice  president ;  E.  E.  Calkett,  cashier ; 
and  C.  E.  Meredith,  assistant  cashier.  The  bank  has  a  capital  and  surplus  of 
one  hundred  thousand  dollars  and  is  regarded  as  one  of  the  safe,  reliable  financial 
concerns  of  this  section  of  the  state.  Mr.  MacPhail  soon  gave  demonstration  of 
his  business  powers,  capacity  and  resourcefulness  and  his  cooperation  has  been 
sought  along  various  other  lines.  He  now  has  important  and  extensive  business 
connections,  being  the  vice  president  of  the  Pacific  Fruit  Package  Company, 
treasurer  of  the  Puget  Sound  &  Willapa  Harbor  Railway  Company,  which  ex- 
tended its  line  from  Tacoma  to  Raymond  in  191 5,  vice  president  of  the  Hardwood 
Mill  Company,  and  president  of  the  MacPhail  Investment  Company,  all  of  which 
indicate  something  of  the  nature,  breadth  and  importance  of  his  interests.  He 
also  organized  the  Willapa  Harbor  Telephone  Company  in  1910  and  was  its 
treasurer  and  one  of  the  directors  until  1914,  when  they  sold  out  to  the  Pacific 
Telegraph  &  Telephone  Company.     He  is  also  interested  with  his  father  in  the 


H.  W.  MacPHATL 


THE   NEW  YORK    1 
PUBLIC  LIBRARY  I 


ASTOR,    LENOX 
TILDEN  FOUNDATION 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  275 

ownership  and  operation  of  eighteen  banks  in  Michigan  and  thus  he  is  promi- 
nently identified  with  the  financial  development  of  two  states.  Together  with 
A.  C.  Little  he  organized  the  Commercial  Club  of  Raymond,  of  which  for  three 
years  he  was  the  president,  putting  forth  efifective  and  well  directed  effort  for  the 
development  of  the  city  through  that  organization  and  instituting  various  methods 
for  the  promotion  of  civic  standards. 

On  the  17th  of  July,  1909,  Mr.  MacPhail  was  married  to  Miss  Ethel  M. 
Maclachlan,  of  Findlay,  Ohio,  and  they  have  one  son,  Norman  Curtis.  Mr. 
MacPhail  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  Presbyterian  church  and  fraternally 
he  is  connected  with  the  Masons,  the  Elks  and  the  Knights  of  Pythias,  having 
taken  the  degrees  of  York  and  Scottish  Rites  in  Masonry,  while  with  the  Nobles 
of  the  Mystic  Shrine  he  has  crossed  the  sands  of  the  desert.  Something  of  the 
nature  of  his  recreation  is  indicated  in  the  fact  that  he  is  a  member  of  the 
Raymond  Rod  and  Gun  Club,  the  Grays  Harbor  Country  and  Golf  Club  and  the 
Tacoma  Country  and  Golf  Club.  His  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  republicar. 
party  and  he  is  conversant  with  all  vital  questions  and  issues  of  the  day.  He  is  a 
man  who  at  all  times  recognizes  his  duties  and  obligations  of  citizenship  and 
who  in  his  business  career  is  ever  stimulated  by  opportunity,  which  is  to  him  a 
call  to  action.  The  word  fail  has  no  place  in  his  vocabulary,  and  determination 
and  energy  have  enabled  him  to  overcome  all  obstacles  and  to  utilize  in  the  best 
possible  manner  the  advantages  offered.  His  work  has  indeed  been  a  contributing 
element  to  the  upbuilding  of  Raymond. 


COLONEL  GRANVILLE  OWEN  HALLER. 

The  life  record  of  Colonel  Granville  Owen  Haller  was  an  exposition  of  a 
spirit  of  lofty  patriotism,  manifest  as  strongly  in  his  efforts  for  the  development 
and  upbuilding  of  the  northwest  as  in  his  service  through  so  many  years  as  a 
member  of  the  army.  While  he  wore  the  nation's  uniform  he  was  a  strict 
disciplinarian,  prompt  in  executing  the  commands  of  a  superior  officer  and 
equally  alert  to  see  that  his  own  orders  were  faithfully  executed.  His  nation's 
honor  was  his  foremost  thought.  When  he  retired  to  private  life  he  still  felt 
that  he  owed  a  service  to  his  country  and  he  gave  it  in  his  efforts  to  promote 
progress  and  upbuilding  in  the  northwest  and  Washington  came  to  know  him  as 
one  of  its  most  honored  and  valued  citizens.  He  was  serving  as  president  of  its 
Old  Settlers  Society  at  the  time  of  his  demise. 

Colonel  Haller  was  born  in  York,  Pennsylvania,  January  31,  1819.  and  his 
father,  George  Haller,  also  first  opened  his  eyes  to  the  light  of  day  in  York.  He 
died  when  his  son  Granville  was  but  two  years  of  age  and  the  mother  was  left 
with  four  young  children  to  care  for  and  supi^ort.  She  displayed  the  spirit  of 
sacrifice  characteristic  of  the  mother  and  so  managed  her  affairs  that  she  was  able 
to  give  her  children  good  educational  ojjportunities.  Granville  O.  Haller  attended 
school  in  his  native  town  and  early  in  life  determined  upon  a  military  career. 
Following  examination  by  the  board  of  military  officers  at  Washington,  D.  C,  in 
T839.  he  was  commissioned  second  lieutenant -in  the  Fourth  Regiment  in  the  United 
States  Infantry,  although  then  but  twenty  years  of  age.  In  1841-2  he  participated 
in  the  Florida  war,  taking  part  in  the  battle  of  Big  Cypress  Swamp  and  the  engage- 


276  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

ment  which  resulted  in  the  capture  of  Halleck  Tushnugger's  band,  which  brought 
an  end  to  the  conflict.  From  the  ist  of  January,  1843,  until  he  resigned,  on  the 
loth  of  September,  1845,  he  was  adjutant  of  the  Fourth  Infantry,  and  he  became 
brigade  major  of  the  Third  Brigade,  United  States  Regulars  under  General 
Taylor,  in  Texas,  in  1845.  During  the  war  with  Mexico  he  commanded  his 
company  from  the  time  of  the  siege  of  Vera  Cruz  until  the  city  of  Mexico  was 
captured,  participating  in  a  number  of  hotly  contested  engagements  in  the  valley 
of  Mexico,  including  the  attack  upon  the  fortifications  of  San  Antonio  and  the 
storming  of  El  Molino  del  Rey.  It  was  his  valor  and  gallantry  on  that  occasion 
that  won  for  him  the  brevet  of  major.  After  participating  in  the  capture  of 
Mexico  city  and  in  skirmishing  within  its  walls  on  the  following  day,  the  officer's 
report  mentioned  his  gallantry  and  valuable  aid.  On  the  ist  of  January,  1848, 
he  was  advanced  to  the  rank  of  captain  in  the  Fourth  Infantrj^  and  afterward 
spent  some  time  on  recruiting  duty. 

In  1852  the  order  came  for  Majors  Sanders  and  Haller  to  join  the  department 
of  the  Pacific  with  their  respective  commands  and  they  sailed  on  the  United 
States  store  ship  Fredonia,  by  way  of  Cape  Horn,  arriving  at  San  Francisco  in 
June,  1853,  thus  completing  the  voyage  of  seven  months.  Major  Haller  and  his 
company  proceeded  at  once  to  Fort  \''ancouver,  Washington,  and  later  to  Fort 
Dallas,  Oregon,  after  which  he  was  engaged  in  active  mihtary  duty  against  the 
Indians  when  military  force  was  of  necessity  employed  to  make  them  understand 
that  the  atrocities  and  murders  which  they  had  inflicted  upon  the  settlers  must  be 
stopped.  He  was  an  active  participant  all  through  the  Indian  war  of  the  north- 
Test  and  rendered  valuable  aid  to  the  government  and  to  the  brave  pioneer  people 
who  were  attempting  to  reclaim  the  region  for  the  purposes  of  civilization.  In 
the  fall  of  1856  he  received  orders  to  establish  and  command  a  fort  near  Port 
Townsend  and  the  work,  notwithstanding  many  formidable  difficulties,  was  satis- 
*factorily  accomplished,  and  for  many  years  the  fort  was  garrisoned  and  known 
as  Fort  Townsend. 

In  speaking  of  his  military  career  a  contemporary  biographer  said :  "While 
there  the  Major  and  his  men  were  a  most  efficient  force  in  protecting  the  settlers, 
and  well  does  Major  Haller -deserve  mention  in  the  history  of  the  northwest,  for 
his  efforts  contributed  in  larger  measure  than  the  vast  majority  to  the  development 
of  this  region,  for  had  it  not  been  for  the  protection  which  he  gave  to  the  settlers 
the  Indians  would  have  rendered  impossible  the  labors  of  the  pioneers  in  the 
work  of  reclaiming  the  wild  land  for  purposes  of  civilization  and  planting  the 
industries  which  have  led  to  the  material  upbuilding  of  this  portion  of  the  country. 
For  some  time  Major  Haller  was  with  his  command  on  board  the  United  States 
ship  patrolling  the  waters  of  the  Sound  and  removed  all  foreign  Indians  from  the 
district.  While  thus  engaged  he  also  participated  in  the  occupation  of  San  Juan 
island  until  the  boundary  question  was  settled.  In  i860  he  was  assigned  to  Fort 
Majave,  in  Arizona,  and  while  stationed  there  he  treated  the  Indians  with  such 
consideration  and  justice  that  when  his  command  had  withdrawn  he  had  so 
gained  the  goodwill  of  the  red  race  that  the  miners  had  no  hesitation  about 
continuing  their  operations  there  and  did  so  without  molestation.  In  1861  came 
orders  for  Major  Haller  to  proceed  with  his  command  to  San  Diego,  California, 
and  afterward  to  New  York  city  to  join  the  army  then  being  organized  by  General 
McClellan.     He  had  previously  been  brevet  major  but  on  the  25th  of  September, 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  277 

1861,  was  promoted  to  major  of  the  Seventh  Infantry -but  the  members  of  the 
regiment  were  being  held  as  prisoners  of  war  in  Texas  and  Major  Haller  reported 
to  General  McClellan  and  shortly  afterward  was  appointed  commandant  general 
at  the  general  headquarters  on  the  staff  of  McClellan  and  the  Ninety-third  Regi- 
ment of  New  York  Volunteers  was  placed  under  his  command  as  guard  of  the 
headquarters.  Major  Haller  was  thus  employed  under  General  McClellan 
throughout  the  Virginia  and  Maryland  campaign  and  the  subsequent  campaign  of 
General  Burnside  and  also  for  a  short  time  under  General  Hooker.  He  was  then 
designated  provost  marshal  general  of  Maryland  and  later  was  detached  and  sent 
to  York  and  Gettysburg  to  muster  in  volunteers  and  to  get  all  the  information 
possible  of  the  movements  of  the  enemy,  also  to  order  the  citizens  to  remove  the 
stock  and  property  across  the  Susquehanna  out  of  the  way  of  the  rebel  army. 
While  thus  busily  engaged  in  the  service  of  his  country,  Major  Haller  was 
wrongfully  reported  for  disloyalty  to  the  government  and  in  the  latter  part  of 
July,  1863,  he  was  dismissed  from  the  service  without  a  hearing.  Astonished 
beyond  measure,  he  demanded  a  hearing,  which  was  refused.  Not  satisfied  to 
submit  to  such  a  great  wrong,  after  sixteen  years  of  waiting  he  secured  a  hearing 
and  was  fully  exonerated.  His  honor  was  fully  vindicated  and  he  was  reinstated 
in  the  army  and  commissioned  colonel  of  infantry  in  the  United  States  Regulars. 
His  command  was  the  Twenty-third  Infantry  and  he  continued  as  its  colonel  from 
December  11,  1879,  to  February  6,  1882,  at  which  time  he  was  retired,  being 
over  sixty-three  years  of  age." 

During  the  period  in  which  he  was  not  connected  with  the  army  Colonel  Haller 
was  a  resident  of  Washington  territory  and  gave  his  attention  to  the  development 
of  a  fine  farm  on  Whitby  island.  His  work  demonstrated  the  possibilities  of 
Washington  for  the  production  of  nearly  all  kinds  of  agricultural  and  horticultural 
products  and  the  example  which  he  set  in  this  direction  has  proven  of  immense 
value  to  the  state,  being  followed  by  others.  He  also  gave  attention  to  the 
manufacture  of  lumber  and  likewise  engaged  in  merchandising.  His  business 
interests  were  of  a  character  which  contributed  to  the  settlement,  upbuilding  and 
improvement  of  the  district  in  which  he  lived.  He  was  very  liberal  in  giving 
credit  to  the  settlers  who  wished  to  buy  provisions  and  implements  and  thus 
enabled  many  to  gain  a  good  start.  While  he  was  engaged  in  business  he  also 
acquired  large  grants  of  land  which  were  at  first  of  little  value  but  with  the 
settlement  of  the  state  their  value  greatly  increased,  and  improvements  also 
added  to  their  selling  price,  so  that  eventually  the  property  became  a  source  of 
gratifying  income  to  Colonel  Haller  and  his  family.  Upon  his  retirement  from 
the  army  he  returned  to  Washington,  having  developed  a  great  fondness  for 
the  state  during  the  years  of  his  former  residence  here.  He  located  in  Seattle 
in  1882  and  remained  continuously  a  resident  of  that  city  until  his  life's  labors 
were  ended  in  death. 

On  the  2 1  St  of  June,  1849,  Colonel  Haller  was  married  to  Miss  Henrietta 
Maria  Cox,  who  belonged  to  a  prominent  Irish  family,  descendants  of  Sir  Richard 
Cox,  who  w^as  her  great-grandfather  and  was  once  lord  chancellor  of  Ireland. 
Coming  to  the  new  world  her  people  located  in  Pennsylvania  and  in  that  state 
Mrs.  Haller  was  reared,  educated  and  married.  Five  children  were  born  to 
this  union.  Henry  died  at  an  early  age.  Morris  came  to  Seattle  prior  to  the  loca- 
tion of  his  parents  here  and  became  prominent  as  an  attorney.    He  was  the  organ- 


278  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

izer  of  extensive  business  enterprises  which  have  proven  of  the  greatest  value  and 
benefit  in  the  upbuilding  of  the  material  interests  of  the  state.  He  was  one  of 
the  organizers  of  the  Seattle,  Lake  Shore  &  Eastern  Railroad  Company  and  vari- 
ous other  business  interests  of  great  magnitude  which  contributed  not  alone  to  the 
success  of  the  owners  and  stockholders  but  as  well  to  general  prosperity.  In 
1889,  while  on  a  hunting  and  fishing  trip  with  T.  T.  Minor  and  E.  Louis  Cox,  he 
was  accidentally  drowned.  This  was  a  distinct  loss  to  the  community  in  which  he 
lived  and  to  the  state  for  he  had  gained  many  friends  and  his  standing  and  promi- 
nence in  business  circles  had  made  him  a  valued  factor  in  public  life.  Alice  Mai 
Haller,  the  eldest  daughter,  became  the  wife  of  Lieutenant  (now  Colonel)  William 
A.  Nichols  and  died  leaving  two  children.  Charlotte  Elinor  and  Theodore 
N.  Haller,  the  latter  mentioned  on  another  page  of  this  work,  are  the  two  surviving 
members  of  the  family. 

The  family  circle  was  once  more  broken  by  the  hand  of  death,  when  on  the 
2d  of  May,  1897,  Colonel  Haller  passed  away,  his  demise  being  the  occasion  of 
deep  and  widespread  regret  to  all  who  knew  him.  He  was  then  in  the  seventy- 
ninth  year  of  his  age,  and  he  was  the  president  of  the  State  Pioneer  Society. 
In  Masonry  he  occupied  a  prominent  position,  having  been  grand  master  of  the 
Grand  Lodge  of  the  territory.  He  took  the  degrees  both  of  the  York  and  the 
Scottish  Rites,  and  his  views  were  considered  authority  on  Masonic  usages,  tenets 
and  rites.  He  was  also  the  commander  of  the  Military  Order  of  the  Loyal  Legion 
of  Washington.  That  he  possessed  business  ability  of  high  order  is  indicated  in 
the  fact  that  he  recognized  the  opportunities  for  the  development  of  the  northwest 
and  for  judicious  investment  and  in  time  his  property  brought  to  him  and  his 
family  a  very  gratifying  income.  The  greater  part  of  his  life,  however,  was 
devoted  to  his  country's  service  and  there  was  no  man  who  displayed  a  more 
loyal  or  devoted  patriotism.  Lie  loved  the  old  flag  and  regarded  it  ever  as  the 
symbol  of  the  highest  national  honor.  He  was  a  man  of  fine  personal  appearance 
and  of  military  bearing.  His  broad  brow  indicated  a  strong  intellect,  his  eyes 
shone  clear  and  bright,  and  he  was  never  afraid  to  look  any  man  in  the  face. 
He  had  the  courage  of  his  convictions,  his  ideals  of  life  were  high,  and  he  ever 
endeavored  to  exemplify  them  in  his  daily  conduct.  Thus  he  left  to  his  family 
the  priceless  heritage  of  an  untarnished  name  and  an  example  which  may  well 
serve  as  a  source  of  inspiration  to  others. 


FREDERICK  J.  WOOD. 

Prominent  among  the  energetic,  farsighted  and  successful  business  men  of 
Bellingham  is  Frederick  J.  Wood,  of  the  E.  K.  Wood  Lumber  Company.  His 
plans  are  always  well  defined  and  carefully  executed  and  thorough  study  and 
broad  experience  have  made  him  familiar  with  every  phase  of  the  lumber  busi- 
ness, so  that  he  is  now  most  capable  of  handling  the  extensive  and  important 
interests  under  his  care.  He  comes  from  another  state  where  the  lumber  indus- 
try flourished  for  many  years,  being  a  native  of  Stanton,  Michigan,  where  his 
birth  occurred  in  1869.  His  father,  E.  K.  Wood,  was  engaged  in  the  lumber 
business    there   and   in    1884   came   to   the   coast   with    Messrs.    Middleton    and 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  279 

Weatherwax  of  Greenville,  Michigan,  and  Aberdeen.  Washington,  respectively. 
Here  they  purchased  timber  lands.  From  1892  Mr.  Wood  continuously  lived 
in  San  Francisco  until  his  death,  which  occurred  July  30,  191 7.  In  his  family 
were  two  sons,  Walter  T.  Wood  being  still  a  resident  of  San  Francisco,  where 
he  is  interested  in  the  lumber  business. 

Frederick  J.  Wood,  however,  came  to  Bellingham  and  has  made  for  himself 
a  most  creditable  position  in  business  circles  here  as  active  manager  of  the 
interests  of  the  E.  K.  Wood  Lumber  Company,  which  was  established  in  Novem- 
ber, 1900,  buying  out  the  Fairhaven  Lumber  Company.  The  new  company  at 
once  remodeled  and  rebuilt  the  plant,  which  has  a  capacity  of  one  hundred  and 
sixty  thousand  feet  of  lumber  and  twenty  thousand  lath  and  employs  from  one 
hundred  and  fifty  to  one  hundred  and  sixty  men.  The  plant  is  being  operated 
to  the  fullest  extent  all  the  time.  They  buy  logs  on  the  market,  having  no  lum- 
ber camps,  and  they  use  both  steam  and  electric  power.  Their  output  is  supplied 
to  both  the  rail  and  the  export  trade.  They  own  their  own  docks  on  the  Sound, 
having  deep  water  here  at  all  times,  and  they  have  connection  with  the  Great 
Northern,  the  Milwaukee  and  the  Northern  Pacific  Railroad  Companies.  Mr. 
Wood  has  practically  been  in  Western  Washington  since  1892.  He  was  con- 
nected with  the  mill  owned  by  the  E.  K.  Wood  Company  at  Hoquiam  from  1892 
to  1899  but  was  in  the  San  Francisco  office  from  1899  to  1900,  after  which  he 
came  to  Bellingham.  He  is  owner  of  the  business  conducted  under  the  name  of 
the  Coast  Clay  Company,  which  employs  about  thirteen  men  engaged  in  the 
manufacture  of  shale  and  clay  products.  This  business  is  developing  and  has 
already  been  placed  upon  a  substantial  and  profitable  basis. 

In  1 89 1  Mr.  Wood  was  united  in  marriage  at  Lakeview,  Michigan,  to  Miss 
Anna  Bale,  and  they  have  two  children,  Warren  B.  and  Marian  A.  Mr.  Wood 
is  identified  with  the  Masons  and  the  Elks.  In  the  former  organization  he  has 
become  a  Knight  Templar,  a  thirty-second  degree  Scottish  Rite  Mason  and  a 
Noble  of  the  Mystic  Shrine.  He  likewise  belongs  to  the  Country  Club,  the 
Cougar  Club  and  the  Kulshan  Club,  in  all  of  which  he  is  active  and  popular.  He 
is  widely  known  and  is  held  in  the  highest  regard  by  all,  enjoying  the  respect 
and  confidence  of  his  ])usiness  colleagues  and  associates  and  the  friendship  of 
all  with  whom  he  comes  in  contact  in  other  connections.  He  measures  up  to 
high  standards  of  manhood  and  citizenship  and  his  business  activities  have  ever 
been  of  a  character  which  have  contributed  to  public  progress  and  improvement 
in  this  section  of  the  state. 


JAMES  M.  SLEICHER,  M.  D. 

Dr.  James  M.  Sleicher,  who  for  the  past  ten  years  has  successfully  engaged 
in  the  practice  of  medicine  in  Chehalis,  claims  Pennsylvania  as  his  native  state, 
his  birth  occurring  in  Allentown,  July  17,  i860,  and  he  is  the  second  in  a  family 
of  five  children.  His  parents,  Jonas  and  Catherine  (  Butz)  Sleicher.  were  also 
born  in  Pennsylvania,  where  the  father  engaged  in  business  as  a  carriage  builder 
for  a  number  of  years.  He  died  in  July,  1907.  and  the  mother  passed  away  when 
the  Doctor  was  a  small  boy. 


280  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

Dr.  Sleicher  acquired  his  early  education  in  the  pubHc  schools  of  the  Keystone 
state  and  the  knowledge  there  obtained  was  supplemented  by  a  course  at  Ursinus 
College  in  Collegeville,  Pennsylvania,  and  at  Columbia  College,  New  York,  grad- 
uating from  both  institutions  with  the  degree  of  A.  B.  Later  he  entered  upon 
the  study  of  medicine  in  Gross  Medical  College,  Denver,  Colorado,  and  upon  his 
graduation  was  granted  the  degree  of  M.  D.  in  1888.  He  was  also  graduated 
from  the  medical  department  of  the  University  of  Louisville,  Kentucky,  and  has 
taken  post  graduate  work  in  Philadelphia,  New  York  and  Chicago  and  also  at 
Johns  Hopkins  University,  Baltimore,  Maryland,  and  under  the  Mayo  brothers 
at  Rochester,  Minnesota.  It  will  thus  be  seen  that  he  is  exceptionally  well  fitted 
for  the  profession  which  he  follows,  keeping  posted  on  all  discoveries  known  to 
the  science  of  medicine  and  surgery,  and  in  his  practice  he  has  met  with  most 
excellent  success.  He  first  opened  an  office  at  Walsenburg,  Colorado,  where  he 
engaged  in  practice  for  seven  years,  and  the  following  twelve  years  were  spent 
at  Watertown,  Wisconsin.  In  1906  Dr.  Sleicher  came  to  Chehalis,  Washington, 
and  here  he  has  followed  his  chosen  calling  ever  since. 

The  Doctor's  wife  was  formerly  a  nurse  at  St.  Helen's  Hospital.  He  has 
one  daughter,  Ruth,  now  the  wife  of  Julian  E.  Smith,  who  is  connected  with 
the  Butler  Paper  Company  of  Chicago,  in  which  city  they  make  their  home. 

In  politics  the  Doctor  has  always  affiliated  with  the  democratic  party  and  in 
religious  faith  he  is  a  Presbyterian.  He  is  a  Knight  Templar  Mason  and  has 
taken  all  of  the  degrees  of  the  Scottish  Rite,  and  is  also  a  member  of  the  Benev- 
olent Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  has  belonged  to  the  Citizens  Club  of  Chehalis 
since  its  inception.  He  is  prominently  identified  with  the  Lewis  County  Medical 
Society,  the  Washington  State  Medical  Society  and  the  American  Medical  As- 
sociation and  has  been  honored  with  the  presidency  of  the  first  named  organ- 
ization and  is  now  a  delegate  from  the  state  to  the  national  association.  It  will 
thus  be  seen  that  he  stands  high  in  the  esteem  of  his  professional  brethren,  who 
recognize  his  ability  and  worth,  and  his  success  is  all  the  more  creditable  in  that 
he  worked  his  way  through  college  and  by  his  own  unaided  efforts  has  sur- 
mounted all  obstacles  in  his  path  until  he  now  ranks  among  the  leading  physicians 
and  surgeons  of  western  Washington. 


WILLIAM  HENRY  LONGFELLOW  FORD. 

William  Henry  Longfellow  Ford,  occupying  the  position  of  city  treasurer  at 
Everett,  was  born  in  Central,  Michigan,  on  the  5th  of  October,  1876.  His  father, 
Samuel  Ford,  a  native  of  England,  came  to  America  about  1866  and  became  one 
of  the  pioneer  residents  of  Central,  Michigan.  He  was  a  miner  and  followed 
that  pursuit  during  the  greater  part  of  his  active  business  life  but  is  now  living 
retired,  making  his  home  at  Ironwood,  Michigan.  His  wife,  who  bore  the  maiden 
name  of  Elizabeth  Williams,  was  born  and  reared  in  England  and  accompanied 
.her  husband  to  the  United  States.  They  became  parents  of  thirteen  children, 
of  whom  William  H.  L.  is  the  third  in  order  of  birth. 

In  the  public  schools  of  Central  and  of  Ironwood,  Michigan,  William  H.  L. 
Ford  pursued  his  education  to  the  age  of  thirteen  years  and  then  started  out 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  281 

in  the  world  as  a  clerk  with  the  Ironwood  Store  Company.  He  was  employed 
in  clerical  lines  in  Ironwood  for  six  years  and  then  sought  the  opportunities  of 
the  northwest,  arriving  in  Everett,  May  17,  1894,  having  no  acquaintances  in  the 
city  at  that  time.  Soon  afterward  he  went  to  Montecristo,  where  he  engaged  in 
mining,  acting  as  a  brakeman,  his  duty  being  to  take  the  ore  from  the  mines  to 
the  terminal  or  concentrator.  He  was  thus  connected  with  mining  interests  until 
1896  and  went  to  Alaska  during  the  days  of  the  early  rush  following  the  gold 
excitement  there.  He  remained  at  Wrangell,  Alaska,  for  a  period  of  eighteen 
months,  during  which  time  he  engaged  in  freighting.  On  returning  to  Wash- 
ington he  settled  at  Everett  and  there  engaged  in  the  lumber  business  as  an  em- 
ploye of  the  Northern  Lumber  Company,  with  which  he  remained  from  1899 
until  1903.  He  afterward  accepted  a  clerical  position  with  the  Everett  Cream- 
ery, Ice  &  Storage  Company  and  in  1906  he  was  appointed  to  the  position  of 
deputy  city  clerk,  serving  under  O.  D.  Wilson,  in  which  department  he  remained 
until  the  26th  of  December,  191 1.  He  was  then  appointed  city  treasurer  by  the 
city  council,  which  office  he  has  since  filled  to  the  satisfaction  of  the  officials  and 
of  the  public  at  large. 

On  the  3d  of  July,  1899,  Mr.  Ford  was  married  at  Everett  to  Miss  Esther 
Ford,  native  of  Ontario,  Canada,  and  a  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  J.  W.  Ford, 
of  English  descent,  the  latter  now  deceased.  There  has  been  one  child  born  of 
this  marriage,  Esther  J.,  whose  birth  occurred  in  Everett  on  the  28th  of  August, 
1900. 

During  his  residence  in  Michigan,  Mr.  Ford  served  as  a  corporal  of  Company 
H  in  the  Fifth  Regiment  of  the  Michigan  National  Guard.  In  politics  he  has 
always  been  an  earnest  republican,  active  in  political  and  civic  affairs.  He  is 
also  identified  with  the  Masonic  and  Odd  Fellows  lodges  and  the  Woodmen  of 
the  World,  all  at  Everett,  and  he  is  likewise  a  member  of  the  Commercial  Club. 
An  Episcopahan  in  religious  faith,  he  is  now  serving  as  secretary  of  the  vestry 
and  he  is  also  a  director  of  the  Young  Men's  Christian  Association  of  Everett. 
In  a  word,  he  is  very  active  in  church  and  charitable  work  and  he  lends  his  aid 
and  influence  to  every  movement  that  tends  to  uplift  the  individual  and  promote 
community  interests,  holding  at  all  times  to  high  standards. 


GEORGE  W.  JEFFREY. 

George'  W.  Jeffrey,  a  grocer  of  Port  Angeles,  was  born  in  Elmborough,  West 
Virginia,  January  10,  1883,  a  son  of  T.  P.  and  Sarah  L.  (Crossfield)  Jeffrey, 
who  are  natives  of  West  Virginia  and  of  England  respectively.  In  early  girl- 
hood the  mother  went  with  her  parents  to  Canada  and  afterward  to  West 
Virginia,  where  she  was  married.  T.  P.  Jeffrey  engaged  in  mercantile  lines  and 
spent  the  greater  part  of  his  life  in  his  native  state  but  is  now  living  in  North 
Yakima,  Washington,  at  the  age  of  sixty-four  years,  while  his  wife  has  reached 
the  age  of  fifty-eight  years.    In  their  family  were  four  children. 

The  second  of  the  number  was  George  W.  Jeffrey,  who  in  his  youthful  days 
attended  the  schools  of  his  native  state  and  was  graduated  from  the  Wesley  high 
school.     His  initial  step  along  business  lines  was  in  connection  with  the  grocery 


282  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

trade  at  Rowena,  Colorado,  where  he  remained  for  three  years.  He  then  went 
to  Julesburg,  Colorado,  and  in  1906  arrived  in  Port  Angeles,  Washington,  where 
he  bought  out  the  grocery  store  of  K.  O.  Erickson.  He  has  been  successful  to 
a  high  degree  in  the  conduct  of  his  business  and  has  one  of  the  most  attractive 
and  best  appointed  grocery  stores  of  the  city,  carrying  a  large  and  well  selected 
line  of  staple  and  fancy  goods. 

On  the  nth  of  April,  191 1,  in  North  Yakima,  Mr.  Jeffrey  was  married  to 
Miss  May  L.  Mook,  a  daughter  of  Anson  and  Mary  L.  Mook,  the  former  now 
deceased.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jefifrey  have  a  daughter,  Maxine  Virginia,  born  in  Port 
Angeles  in  191 3.  Mr.  Jeffrey  follows  an  independent  course  politically  and  fra- 
ternally is  connected  with  the  Elks  and  the  Odd  Fellows.  He  has  worked  his 
way  upward  entirely  unaided  and  stands  high  not  only  as  a  merchant  but  as  a 
citizen  of  Port  Angeles. 


H.  W.  PATTON. 


H.  W.  Patton,  former  editor  of  the  Grays  Harbor  Washingtonian,  a  daily 
paper  published  at  Hoquiam,  has  devoted  practically  his  entire  life  to  journalism 
and  has  had  the  broad  experience  which  comes  through  the  varied  lines  of 
newspaper  work.  He  was  born  in  Missouri  in  1856  and  completed  his  education 
in  the  State  University  at  Columbia,  Missouri.  In  1880  he  went  to  Texas  and 
in  1883  became  a  resident  of  California,  where  he  engaged  in  newspaper  work. 
He  was  also  made  special  agent  of  the  United  States  interior  department  in 
southern  California,  having  charge  of  the  allotment  of  lands  in  thirty-one  Indian 
reservations.  Almost  his  entire  life,  however,  has  been  given  to  newspaper  work 
and  his  specialty  has  seemed  that  of  taking  charge  of  any  building  up  run-down 
papers.  He  has  been  particularly  successful  in  that  field,  for  he  possesses  the 
ability  of  presenting  news  in  an  attractive  form  that  results  in  the  rapid  develop- 
ment of  the  circulation  department.  His  newspaper  work  has  brought  to  him 
many  interesting  experiences,  some  of  which  are  of  a  most  unusual  character. 
In  1 89 1  he  undertook  a  trip  in  a  flat  bottomed  boat  for  the  San  Francisco 
Examiner  from  Yuma,  Arizona,  into  the  Imperial  valley  of  California.  He  was 
one  of  the  first  white  men  who  ever  went  over  the  district  now  known  as  the 
Imperial  valley  and  was  on  that  trip  the  discoverer  of  the  source  of  the  Salton  sea. 
Another  interesting  and  unusual  trip  which  he  made  was  in  1897,  when  in  the 
service  of  the  government  he  visited  the  Cannibal  or  Tiburon  islands  on  a  tour  of 
inspection,  making  a  full  report  to  the  department  on  his  return.  He  held  the 
position  of  register  of  the  United  States  land  office  in  Los  Angeles  for  three  years, 
beginning  in  1888. 

Mr.  Patton's  identification  with  newspaper  publication  in  Washington  began  in 
1899,  when  he  went  to  Everett  and  purchased  the  paper  now  published  under 
the  name  of  the  Herald.  Two  years  later,  or  in  1901.  he  took  over  the  Aberdeen 
World,  then  known  as  the  Bulletin,  and  built  up  that  paper,  placing  it  upon  a 
substantial  basis.  Later  he  went  to  Eureka,  California,  where  he  purchased  the 
Standard,  and  upon  his  return  to  Washington  settled  in  Bellingham,  where  for 
six  years  he  conducted  the  x\merican  and  the  Reveille.    In  1912  Mr.  Patton  came 


H.  W.  PATTON 


HE   NE  )^K     r 

PUBLIC  LIBRARY 


ASTOR,    LENOX  j 

TIX-DBN   FOUNDATION  f. 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  285 

to  Hoquiam  as  editor  of  the  Grays  Harbor  Washingtonian,  which  had  been 
estabhshed  in  1889  by  O.  M.  Moon  as  a  weekly  paper.  It  changed  hands  several 
times  before  passing  into  possession  of  its  present  owner,  Congressman  Albert 
Johnson,  in  1908,  and  when  he  was  elected  to  Congress  in  1912  he  placed  Mr. 
Patton  in  charge.  The  Washingtonian  was  changed  to  a  daily  paper  about  1905 
and  today  the  office  is  most  modern  in  its  equipment  and  methods,  containing 
two  linotype  machines  and  other  equipment  of  the  up-to-date  printing  office.  The 
circulation  has  increased  to  twenty-seven  hundred  and  the  Washingtonian  is 
today  a  real  organ  in  the  development  of  Grays  Harbor  and  the  exploitation  of 
its  interests.  Mr.  Patton  as  a  newspaper  man  possesses  initiative  as  well  as 
enterprise  and,  readily  grasping  the  points  of  a  situation,  eliminates  that  which  is 
nonessential  and  develops  to  the  full  the  essential  points  leading  to  success. 

In  1886,  at  Los  Angeles,  Cahfornia,  Mr.  Patton  was  married  to  Miss  Elizabeth 
F.  Jordan,  of  Massachusetts,  who  passed  away  leaving  four  children :  Mrs.  Irene 
Cooper,  of  Bellingham;  Joseph  L.,  of  Seattle;  Clotilde,  at  home;  and  Ysabel,  a 
senior  in  the  Washington  State  University.  On  the  ist  of  October,  1914,  Mr. 
Patton  wedded  Mrs.  S.  S.  McMillan  nee  Soule,  a  representative  of  one  of  the 
prominent  pioneer  families  of  the  state.  She  is  very  active  and  public-spirited 
and  has  been  connected  with  various  movements  which  have  worked  for  the 
benefit  of  the  commonwealth  and  the  uplift  of  the  individual.  She  was  appointed 
by  the  president  a  member  of  the  commission  which  spent  several  months  in 
Europe  studying  rural  credits  and  rural  conditions  and  visited  many  of  the 
agricultural  districts  there.  She  has  been  regent  of  the  Robert  Gray  Chapter  of 
the  Daughters  of  the  American  Revolution  and  is  a  delegate  to  the  Continental 
Congress  of  the  organization  at  Washington  in  the  current  year.  She  belongs 
to  the  Woman's  Club,  to  the  County  Pioneers  Association,  to  the  State  Historical 
Society,  of  which  she  is  serving  on  the  board,  and  is  also  a  member  of  the  state 
library  board.  These  associations  indicate  something  of  the  breadth  of  her  inter- 
ests and  the  scope  of  her  activities,  which  have  reached  out  along  constantly 
developing  lines  in  an  effort  to  improve  economic  and  sociological  conditions. 

Mr.  Patton  is  identified  with  the  Masonic  fraternity  and  with  the  Benevolent 
Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  his  high  standing  in  newspaper  circles  is  indicated 
in  the  fact  that  he  has  been  honored  with  the  presidency  of  the  Washington  State 
Press  Association,  in  which  capacity  he  served  in  1916. 


CLARENCE  B.  BAGLEY. 

Clarence  B.  Bagley  was  born  in  Troy  Grove,  near  Dixon,  Illinois,  November 
30,  1843.  His  father  was  what  was  called  in  those  days  an  itinerant  minister 
^n  the  service  of  the  Methodist  Protestant' church  and  stationed  but  a  year  at  a 
time  in  a  place.  Clarence's  early  memories  are  of  Abingdon,  La  Fayette,  Prince- 
ton and  Chicago. 

On  the  20th  of  April,   1852,  the   family  started  from  Princeton  across  the 

plains.     They  reached  the  Missouri  river  May  22d,  the  summit  of  the  Rocky 

Mountains  July  4th,  The  Dalles,  Oregon,   September  3d,  and   Salem,  Oregon, 

September  21st  of  that  year.     They  lived  in  and  near  Salem   for  eight  years. 
Vol  n— 15 


286  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

In  November,  1852,  Clarence  began  school  studies  in  the  Willamette  Institute, 
later  called  Willamette  University,  in  Salem  and  continued  in  school  all  the 
time  in  the  winters  and  part  of  the  summers  until  i860.  In  1856  the  family 
moved  out  from  Salem  to  a  farm  and  lived  there  for  four  years.  During  that 
time  Clarence  became  familiar  with  farming  operations,  with  horses  and  cattle 
and  the  farm  hfe  of  that  pioneer  period. 

In  October,  i860,  Rev.  Daniel  Bagley,  his  wife  and  Clarence  started  in  a 
buggy  to  make  the  overland  trip  from  Salem  to  Seattle,  Washington,  arriving 
at  the  latter  place  during  the  last  days  of  October.  That  winter  Rev.  Daniel 
Bagley  taught  the  village  school  and  during  his  absence  of  several  weeks 
Clarence  officiated  in  his  place. 

In  1 861  he  began  work  clearing  the  timber  from  the  site  of  the  university, 
which  had  during  that  winter  been  located  in  Seattle  by  the  legislature.  During 
the  remainder  of  the  year  1861  and  the  greater  part  of  1862  he  worked  upon 
and  about  the  university,  clearing,  painting,  carpentering,  making  fences  and 
doing  other  odd  jobs  of  work.  Late  in  1862  he  went  by  sailing  vessel  with 
his  mother  to  San  Francisco,  returning  that  fall  also  on  a  sailing  vessel.  In 
1863  he  accompanied  his  father  and  mother  by  way  of  San  Francisco  and  the 
Isthmus  to  New  York  and  to  Meadville,  Pennsylvania,  where  he  attended 
Allegheny  College  that  winter.  In  April,  1864,  the  family  started  on  their 
return  by  way  of  the  Isthmus  to  Seattle,  reaching  the  latter  place  about  the 
1st  of  July.  The  rest  of  that  year  and  during  1865  he  was  engaged  at  his 
trade  as  a  painter  in  the  little  village. 

On  the  24th  of  December,  1865,  he  was  married  to  Alice  Mercer.  In  1866 
he  received  an  appointment  as  clerk  in  the  surveyor  general's  office  under 
Selucius  Garfielde,  in  Olympia,  and  he  and  his  young  bride  removed  to  that 
place,  where  he  was  employed  in  that  office  for  nearly  three  years.  Late  in 
1868  he  went  into  the  printing  office  of  Randall  H.  Hewitt,  where  he  learned 
the  printer's  trade,  being  employed  upon  the  Territorial  Republican  and  the 
Echo,  the  latter  a  temperance  paper.  This  paper  he  bought  the  next  year  and 
continued  to  publish  until  1869,  when  he  disposed  of  his  interest  in  it.  In  1869 
he  was  employed  upon  the  Commercial  Age,  a  paper  recently  established  in 
Olympia.  and  in  October  was  elected  clerk  of  the  council  of  the  legislature, 
serving  during  that  winter.  In  1870  the  Commercial  Age  was  discontinued  and 
he  and  his  wife  then  returned  to  Seattle  and  lived  there  during  the  remainder 
of  that  year  and  until  May,  1871. 

During  the  winter  of  1870  his  time  was  occupied  in  aiding  in  the  development 
of  the  Newcastle  coal  mines.  Aluch  of  the  time  he  had  charge  of  the  company's 
store  at  Newcastle  and  of  the  company's  operations  above  ground.  In  May, 
1871,  he  received  appointment  from  Samuel  Coulter  as  deputy  in  the  office  of 
the  internal  revenue  collector  of  Washington  at  Olympia  and  held  that  position 
vmtil  1873.  In  November,  1872,  he  was  appointed  business  manager  and  city 
editor  of  the  Puget  Sound  Courier,  which  had  been  established  on  January  ist 
of  that  year  in  Olympia.  In  1873  ^^  ^^^  Samuel  Coulter  and  Thomas  M. 
Reed  bought  that  newspaper  and  the  printing  office  connected  with  it.  Later  in 
that  year  he  bought  the  interest  of  his  partners. 

In  the  fall  of  1873  he  was  appointed  by  Henry  G.  Struve.  secretary  of  the 
territory,  territorial  printer  and  he  held  that  position  under  different  secretaries 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  287 

for  ten  years,  during  which  period  he  also  continued  to  edit  and  pubHsh  the 
Courier  and  to  carry  on  a  large  job  printing  business  connected  with  it.  In  1884 
he  disposed  of  his  interest  in  the  newspaper  and  printing  office,  and  for  several 
months  had  charge  of  the  office  of  the  collector  of  internal  revenue  in  Portland, 
Oregon. 

In  1874  he  was  again  appointed  deputy  collector  of  internal  revenue  by 
Edward  Giddings  with  full  charge  of  the  office.  Mr.  Giddings  died  in  April, 
1876,  and  Mr.  Bagley  remained  acting  collector  until  July  ist,  when  Major 
James  R.  Hayden  assumed  charge  as  collector  and  Mr.  Bagley  retained  the 
■chief  deputyship.  They  served  together  until  the  Washington  district  was  con- 
solidated with  Oregon,  and  then  the  latter  retained  his  deputyship  under  Collector 
John  C.  Cartwright  until  President  Cleveland  appointed  a  democrat  early  in 
1885. 

Soon  afterward  he  disposed  of  his  interests  in  Olympia  and  returned  to  Seattle 
to  live.  He  began  at  once  to  clear  the  site  for  his  future  home  from  the  original 
forest  in  the  northern  part  of  the  city,  on  the  old  donation  claim  of  his  wife's 
father,  Thomas  Mercer,  then  a  long  way  from  the  settled  part  of  the  town,  and  in 
1886  he  and  his  family  established  themselves,  in  their  new  home,  where  they  have 
continued  to  reside  to  the  present  date.  That  year  he  and  several  other  gentle- 
men bought  the  Post-Intelligencer  daily  and  weekly  newspaper,  and  during  the 
next  year  he  was  its  business  manager,  until  it  was  bought  by  L.  S.  J.  Hunt. 
He  then  purchased  a  new  outfit  and  started  in  his  old  business  of  job  printing. 

Soon  afterward  he  was  associated  with  Homer  M.  Hill  in  the  ownership  and 
publication  of  the  Daily  Press.  In  1888  he  disposed  of  his  interests  in  the  print- 
ing office  and  newspaper  and  early  in  1889  joined  with  a  party  of  gentlemen  in 
the  establishment  of  a  bank  in  the  north  part  of  the  city.  A  year  later  he  sold 
out  his  interest  in  that  institution.  In  1890  he  was  elected  a  member  of  the  house 
of  delegates  of  the  city  council  and  served  a  two-year  term. 

During  1890,  1891,  1892  and  1893  '"'e  made  several  trips  to  Chicago,  having 
been  appointed  by  Governor  E.  P.  Ferry  an  alternate  commissioner  of  the  Colum- 
bian Exposition,  then  planning  to  be  held  in  Chicago  in  1893.  He  was  one  of 
those  who  voted  for  and  secured  the  establishment  of  the  Exposition  on  the 
site  at  Jackson  Park.  In  1892  he  joined  in  the  establishment  of  another  bank 
in  the  northern  part  of  the  city  and  had  charge  of  that  institution  until  the 
disastrous  failures  of  so  many  institutions  in  1893  carried  that  institution  down 
in  the  general  crash. 

In  September,  1894,  he  received  an  appointment  from  \\'ill  II.  Perry  as 
deputy  in  the  office  of  city  comptroller  and  served  in  that  position  until  1900, 
when  he  was  appointed  secretary  of  the  board  of  public  works  of  the  city,  which 
position  he  has  continued  to  occupy  until  the  present  time,  having  already  com- 
pleted twenty-one  years  of  continuous  service  in  the  employ  of  the  city. 

Early  in  his  business  career  he  began  the  preservation  of  the  newspapers  of 
the  territory  and  its  laws  and  journals,  and  during  the  lapse  of  years  gathered 
a  large  and  extremely  valuable  collection.  About  1900  he  began  writing  sketches 
and  articles  for  the  newspapers  and  the  magazines  of  the  northwest  pertaining 
to  the  early  history  of  western  Washington  and  particularly  of  Seattle.  This 
revived  his  interest  in  the  collecting  of  historical  material  and  he  began  assem1)ling 
all   the  books,   pamphlets   and   publications   accessible   pertaining  to   the    Pacific 


288  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

northwest,  chiefly  of  the  old  Oregon  territory."  At  the  present  time  he  has  the 
largest  and  best  selected  collection  of  that  character  extant  excepting  that  of  the 
Oregon  E[istorical  Association  at  Portland  and  the  library  of  British  Columbia 
at  Victoria. 

During  the  period  of  the  Civil  war  he  was  a  strong  believer  in  the  justice 
of  the  Union  cause  and  a  supporter  of  the  Union  party  in  Seattle  and  immediately 
after  the  close  of  the  war  attached  himself  to  the  republican  party  and  has  been 
a  member  of  that  organization  all  the  later  years. 

Clarence  B.  Bagley  and  Alice  Mercer  were  married  by  Rev.  C.  G.  Belknap,  in 
Seattle,  December  24,  1865. 

Their  children  are:  Rena,  born  in  Seattle,  August  3,  1868;  Myrta,  born  in 
Olympia,  December  22,  1871 ;  Ethel  W.,  born  in  Olympia,  June  16,  1877;  Alice 
Claire,  born  in  Olympia,  November  4,  1879;  Cecil  Clarence,  born  in  Seattle,  July 
21,  1888. 

Rena  Bagley  and  Frank  S.  Griffith  were  married  in  Seattle,  January  10,  1893. 
Daughter,  Phyllis,  born  September  2,  1896. 

Myrta  Bagley  and  Earle  R.  Jenner  were  married  in  Seattle,  April  21,  1897. 
Sons :  Earle  B.,  born  July  28,  1900;  Lawrence  M.,  born  July  2,  1909;  Frederick  C., 
born  July  2,  191 1. 

Ethel  W.  Bagley  and  H.  Eugene  Allen  were  married  in  Seattle,  March  2, 
1904.    Sons  :  Richard  B.,  born  July  19,  1907;  Robert  M.,  bom  May  23,  191 1. 

Alice  Claire  Bagley  and  Frederick  Dent  Hammons  were  married  in  Seattle, 
June  24,  1900. 

Cecil  Clarence  Bagley  and  Myrtle  Park  were  married  November  26,  1912. 
Son :  Park  Daniel,  born  May  20,  1914. 


CAPTAIN  HANS  K.  A.  JOHNSON. 

Captain  Hans  K.  A.  Johnson,  who  has  been  captain  on  all  the  tugboats  of 
the  Northwestern  Lumber  Company  during  the  years  of  his  residence  at  Hoquiam, 
where  he  took  up  his  abode  on  the  8th  of  August,  1886,  is  a  native  of  Norway. 
He  was  thirty  years  of  age  at  the  time  of  his  arrival  at  Hoquiam,  his  birth  having 
occurred  in  1856.  In  1873  he  left  the  land  of  the  midnight  sun  for  the  United 
States  and  settled  at  Philadelphia,  where  he  remained  for  a  number  of  years 
and  then  came  to  the  Pacific  coast.  For  five  or  six  years  he  lived  at  Astoria, 
Oregon,  where  he  followed  steamboating  and  fishing,  and  on  the  expiration  of 
that  period  he  removed  to  Hoquiam,  where  he  at  once  entered  the  employ  of  the 
Northwestern  Lumber  Company  in  the  shipyards,  building  several  boats.  He 
was  afterward  made  mate  on  the  tug  Ranger  and  five  years  later  was  advanced 
to  the  position  of  captain.  He  has  been  a  captain  on  all  the  tugboats  of  the  com- 
pany since  and  has  served  the  corporation  well,  as  he  can  always  be  depended 
upon  and  knows  thoroughly  the  craft  on  which  he  sails.  He  also  has  other  busi- 
ness interests,  being  a  director  of  the  Soule  Tug  &  Barge  Company. 

In  1896  Captain  Johnson  was  married  in  San  Francisco  to  Mrs.  Anna  Brad- 
ley and  they  have  one  son,  Paul.  Captain  Johnson  has  ever  been  ready  to  serve 
his  community  in  any  possible  way  and  has  worked  earnestly  for  Hoquiam's  up- 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  289 

building,  believing  in  doing  more  for  the  city  in  which  he  lives  than  for  some 
other  town.  In  politics  he  is  a  republican,  and  while  he  keeps  well  informed  on 
the  questions  and  issues  of  the  day,  has  never  been  an  office  seeker.  Fraternally 
he  is  identified  with  the  Odd  Fellows  and  the  Masons  and  in  the  latter  organiza- 
tion has  attained  the  thirty-second  degree  of  the  Scottish  Rite,  while  in  his  life 
he  exemplifies  the  beneficent  spirit  of  the  craft. 


WILLIAM   T.  BIGGAR. 


William  J.  Biggar,  a  member  of  the  Bellingham  bar  whose  ability  stands 
the  practical  test  of  the  work  of  the  courts  and  whose  enviable  reputation  is 
based  upon  what  he  has  actually  accomplished,  is  now  senior  partner  of  the 
firm  of  Biggar  &  Waters.  He  prepared  for  his  chosen  profession  at  the  Uni- 
versity of  Michigan  but  is  a  Pacific  coast  man  by  birth  and  training.  He  was 
born  near  Santa  Rosa,  Sonoma  county,  California,  on  the  i8th  of  September, 
1878,  and  comes  of  sturdy  Scotch  and  Irish  parentage,  being  a  son  of  William  J. 
and  Mary  (Stuart)  Biggar,  the  latter  a  lineal  descendant  of  the  historic  Stuart 
family  of  Scotland.  The  father  was  born  in  Cookstown,  County  Tyrone,  Ireland, 
in  1838,  and  was  a  representative  of  the  Biggar  family  which  played  a  conspicuous 
and  most  honorable  part  in  the  famous  controversy  between  the  people  of 
Ireland  and  their  absentee  landlords,  caused  by  the  latter's  usurpation  of  power. 
While  that  struggle  was  going  on  Joseph  Gillis  Biggar  was  a  member  of  parlia- 
ment from  County  Tyrone  and  was  a  leader  in  the  historic  debates  on  the  Irish 
land  question.  In  the  early  days  of  California's  development  William  J.  Biggar, 
Sr.,  became  a  resident  of  that  state,  settling  near  Santa  Rosa,  where  he  became 
the 'Owner  of  land  and  developed  a  farm.  He  was  always  a  very  vigorous  de- 
fender of  democratic  views. 

Reared  upon  the  homestead  farm,  William  J.  Biggar,  Jr.,  attended  the  public 
and  high  schools  of  Santa  Rosa  and  continued  to  assist  his  father  in  the  de- 
velopment of  the  home  place  until,  determining  upon  the  practice  of  law  as  a 
life  work,  he  made  his  way  to  Ann  Arbor,  Michigan,  where  he  entered  the  State 
University,  from  which  he  was  graduated  with  the  class  of  1899.  He  then 
went  to  Kansas  City,  Missouri,  where  he  entered  upon  the  practice  of  law. 
in  which  he  continued  actively  until  1908.  In  that  year  he  arrived  in  Ik-lling- 
ham,  Washington,  and  formed  a  partnership  with  X.  K.  Staley  under  the  lirm 
name  of  Staley  &  Biggar,  an  association  that  was  maintained  until  lO'.v  when 
he  became  associated  with  Thomas  R.  Waters  as  senior  partner  in  the  now  exist- 
ing law  firm  of  Biggar  &  Waters.  They  are  accorded  a  liberal  clientage  of  a 
large  and  distinctively  representative  character  and  the  reputation  which  .Mr. 
Biggar  has  won  at  the  bar  is  well  deserved,  for  he  is  most  thorough  and  pains- 
taking in  the  preparation  of  his  cases,  is  clear  and  felicitous  in  argument,  logical 
in  his  deductions  and  correct  in  his  application  of  legal  princi])les  to  the  j)oints 
at  issue. 

On  the  22d  of  October,  1906,  Mr.  Biggar  was  married  in  Kansas  City. to 
Miss  Sarah  Margaret  Vance.  He  is  well  known  as  a  mem!)er  of  the  Elks  lodge 
and  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and  he  has  membership  as  well  in 


290  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

the  Unitarian  church.  He  belongs  also  to  the  Metropolitan  Club  of  Seattle  and 
in  his  political  views  is  a  progressive.  It  is  well  known  that  his  position  is 
never  an  equivocal  one ;  he  fearlessly  but  not  aggressively  announces  his  belief 
and  stands  loyally  by  his  opinions.  While  his  early  political  allegiance  was 
given  to  the  republican  party  he  became  convinced  because  of  its  policy  and 
attitude  upon  vital  questions  that  the  time  had  arrived  for  the  establishment 
of  a  new  party  and  he  did  not  hesitate  to  join  the  progressive  ranks,  in  fact 
was  one  of  the  first  in  the  state  to  come  out  strongly  in  support  of  the  new  or- 
ganization. In  191 2  he  was  one  of  the  electors  on  the  ticket  which  supported 
Theodore  Roosevelt  for  president  and  cast  his  vote  for  him.  Roosevelt  carried 
the  state  of  Washington  at  that  time.  He  has  ever  believed  that  a  public  offi- 
cial owes  his  whole  duty  to  the  people  and  he  advocates  many  advanced  meas- 
ures, including  a  system  of  rural  credits,  which  will  enable  farmers  to  obtain 
loans  direct  from  the  government  at  a  rate  of  interest  not  to  exceed  four  per 
cent.  Moreover,  he  regards  the  flag  of  the  country  as  something  more  than 
a  thing  to  be  talked  about — as  the  emblem  of  the  people's  sovereign  will,  beneath 
the  folds  of  which  the  weakest  must  be  protected  and  which  the  strongest  must 
obey.  In  other  words  Mr.  Biggar  is  a  deep  thinker  and  a  student  of  the  vital 
questions  and  issues  of  the  day  and  he  undertakes  the  solution  of  political  and 
of  legal  problems  with  equal  thoroughness,  which  is  one  of  his  strongly  marked 
characteristics  and  has  been  an  important  factor  in  his  attainment  of  gratifying 
success  at  the  bar. 


SOLOMON  W.  FISHER. 

Solomon  W.  Fisher,  who  owns  a  well  improved  farm  at  Fisher,  Washington, 
overlooking  the  Columbia  river,  is  applying  the  progressiveness  and  enterprise 
characteristic  of  the  west  to  his  farm  work  and  has  already  gained  a  gratifying 
measure  of  prosperity.  He  is  a  western  man  by  birth  as  well  as  by  preference, 
his  birthplace  being  Ritter,  Oregon.  His  natal  day  was  the  2d  of  August,  1884, 
and  he  is  a  son  of  Job  and  Lydia  (Allphin)  Fisher,  natives  respectively  of  Vir- 
ginia and  of  Oregon.  The  father  was  born  July  25,  1827,  and  when  twenty- 
three  years  of  age  located  in  Clarke  county,  Washington,  after  having  spent 
one  year  in  California.  He  took  up  a  donation  claim  of  one  hundred  and  sixty 
acres  in  Clarke  county  which  is  now  the  home  of  our  subject.  In  i860  the 
father  went  to  Grant  county,  in  eastern  Oregon,  where  he  mined  to  some  extent, 
but  gave  the  greater  part  of  his  attention  to  raising  fine  horses,  which  he  shipped 
and  sold  in  eastern  markets.  He  took  a  great  deal  of  pride  in  his  horses  and 
gained  an  enviable  reputation  as  a  breeder.  During  the  early  days  the  Indians 
were  numerous  and  often  hostile  and  he  took  an  active  part  in  the  Indian  wars 
of  1855  and  1856  and  he  gained  considerable  note  as  an  Indian  fighter,  being  a 
man  of  unusual  daring.  During  the  years  from  1888  to  1899  ^^  resided  in  Linn 
and  ^lultnomah  counties,  Oregon,  but  in  i89<)  he  returned  to  his  original  claim 
in  Clarke  county.  Washington,  where  he  lived  until  his  death,  which  occurred 
on  the  3d  of  February,  1905.  In  1883,  while  living  in  Grant  county,  he  mar- 
ried  Lydia   Allphin,    who   is   said   to   have   been   the   third   white   child   born   in 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  291 

Oregon.  She  reached  an  advanced  age,  dying  in  1913.  She  was  the  mother 
of  four  children  :  three  daughters,  all  of  whom  are  now  deceased,  and  Solomon  W. 

The  last  named  received  a  common  school  education  and  remained  at  home 
until  he  attained  his  majority.  For  several  years  he  devoted  his  time  almost 
exclusively  to  operating  the  home  farm  in  association  with  his  father  aiid  the 
practical  training  thus  received  well  qualified  him. to  follow  agricultural  pur- 
suits on  his  own  account.  He  is  now  operating  the  farm  which  his  father  took 
up  as  a  donation  claim  many  years  ago  and  its  high  state  of  development  testifies 
to  his  efficiency  and  good  management.  Not  only  are  the  fields  well  cultivated, 
but  the  barns  and  other  buildings  are  substantial  and  well  adapted  to  their  pur- 
pose and  the  residence  is  commodious  and  attractive. 

In  1905  Mr.  Fisher  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Mary  E.  Cates,  a  native 
of  Oregon  and  a  daughter  of  William  A.  Cates,  now  a  resident  of  Clarke  county, 
this  state.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Fisher  have  been  born  two  children:  Ida,  whose 
birth  occurred  May  20,  1906;  and  Mamie,  born  December  20,  1907. 

Mr.  Fisher  is  a  democrat  and  gives  careful  study  to  cjuestions  of  government 
although  not  an  office  seeker.  He  belongs  to  both  the  Farmers  Grange  and  the 
United  Artisans,  in  both  of  which  organizations  he  is  well  liked.  He  has  thor- 
oughly identified  his  interests  with  those  of  his  community  and  can  be  counted 
upon  to  do  his  part  in  furthering  the  public  Vvelfare. 


CAPTAIN  GEORGE  E.  SANBORN. 

Captain  George  E.  Sanborn,  of  Hoquiam,  has  always  lived  on  the  seaboard, 
first  on  the  Atlantic  coast  and  now  for  eighteen  years  on  the  Pacific.  He  was 
born  at  Machias  Port,  Maine,  in  1868.  His  father,  John  Sanborn,  was  a  sea 
captain  for  many  years  and  in  fact  represented  the  firm  of  Chase,  Talbot  &  Com- 
pany of  New  York  city  for  four  decades.  He  also  had  four  brothers  who  were 
sea  captains  and  thus  it  is  that  the  family  has  been  closely  connected  with  nav- 
igation interests.  Captain  John  Sanborn  wedded  Sarah  Holmes  and  their  son, 
George  E.,  to  whom  there  naturally  came  a  love  of  the  sea,  began  sailing  when 
he  was  but  fourteen  years  of  age.  For  three  years  he  was  in  the  employ  of  J.  A. 
Simpson,  of  New  York,  and  afterward  spent,  nine  years  with  the  John  S.  Emory 
Company,  of  Boston.  As  captain  he  commanded  the  international  racing  yacht 
Volunteer  and  the  yacht  Puritan  for  Commodore  J.  Malcolm  Forbes,  of  Boston, 
and  also  the  bark  Clotilde,  the  bark  Megunticook  and  the  brig  Hattie.  In  1898 
he  arrived  in  California,  where  he  met  Captain  Mat  Peasley,  a  schoolmate,  whom 
he  had  known  in  Maine,  who  induced  him  to  take  a  trij)  as  mate  on  his  vessel 
bound  for  Mexico.  Upon  their  return  the  captain  induced  Mr.  Sanborn  to 
remove  to  Hoquiam,  where  he  went  to  work  on  the  new  waterworks,  being  thus 
employed  until  the  plant  was  completed.  He  afterward  became  mate  on  the  tug 
Traveler  under  Captain  John  Reed,  spending  two  and  a  half  years  in  that  con- 
nection, when  he  was  advanced  to  the  position  of  captain  of  the  tug.  He  con- 
tinued to  command  boats  as  captain  for  that  company,  the  Grays  Harbor  Tow- 
boat  Company  at  Hoquiam,  doing  harbor  and  river  and  coastwise  towing,  and 
remaining  in  their  employ   for  eighteen  years  or  until  June  7,   1916,   when  he 


292  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

resigned  from  their  service.  After  resting  for  six  weeks  he  was  offered  and 
accepted  the  position  of  Hoquiam  manager  of  the  Grays  Harbor  Stevedore  Com- 
pany and  has  found  the  work  much  to  his  Hking.  He  is  navigation  officer  of 
the  government  mihtia,  having  charge  of  the  torpedo  boat  Fox.  He  is  also  vice 
president  of  the  Soule  Tug  &  Barge  Company. 

In  Maine,  in  1889,  Captain  Sanborn  was  married  to  Miss  Hattie  E.  Getchell 
and  they  have  had  two  sons :  George  Harrison,  who  was  drowned  here  a  few 
years  ago ;  and  John  Edward,  living  in  Hoquiam.  In  his  political  views  Captain 
Sanborn  is  a  republican  and  fraternally  he  is  connected  with  the  Masons,  the 
Elks  and  the  Foresters.  He  has  visited  all  countries  and  many  ports  of  the  world 
and  his  has  been  a  broad  and  interesting  experience,  bringing  him  wide  knowledge 
of  various  lands  and  their  peoples.  He  can  relate  many  a  thrilling  tale,  some 
of  which  are  matters  of  personal  experience,  and  there  is  no  phase  of  navigation 
with  which  he  is  not  familiar. 


CHARLES  R.  WILSON. 

Charles  R.  Wilson  was  closely  associated  with  those  interests  which  have  been 
important  factors  in  the  upbuilding  of  Aberdeen,  which  owes  its  rapid  growth  to 
the  development  of  the  lumber  industry.  He  was  the  founder  and  promoter  of 
the  enterprise  conducted  under  the  name  of  Wilson  Brothers  &  Company  and 
developed  one  of  the  leading  lumber  mills  of  the  state.  His  birth  occurred  in 
Gothenburg  and  Bohus  Ian,  Sweden,  on  the  24th  of  July,  1846,  and  after  spending 
the  days  of  his  boyhood  and  youth  in  that  country  he  came  to  the  United  States 
in  1868,  when  a  young  man  of  twenty-two  years,  landing  at  New  York,  whence 
he  afterward  made  his  way  to  San  Francisco  and  thence  sailed  for  Portland, 
Oregon.  On  his  arrival  in  the  latter  city  he  and  his  brother  Fred,  who  had 
accompanied  him,  began  work  on  a  small  steamboat  and  soon  afterward  he  and 
his  brother  Henry  purchased  that  boat,  while  Fred  Wilson  bought  a  larger  one. 
The  two  brothers,  who  were  partners,  did  towing  on  the  Columbia  river  and  thus 
carried  on  business  together  for  a  number  of  years.  In  1881  they  purchased  a 
small  sawmill  near  Rainier,  Oregon,  and  when  soon  afterward  it  was  destroyed 
by  fire  they  rebuilt  and  the  two  operated  the  mill,  one  working  as  engineer  and 
the  other  as  sawyer.  When  they  bought  the  sawmill  they  also  purchased  a  lum- 
beryard in  Portland,  Oregon,  and  retained  ownership  of  the  steamboat.  Thus 
they  were  able  to  do  all  of  the  work  in  the  manufacture  of  lumber  from  the  time 
the  standing  timber  was  cut  until  the  lumber  was  delivered  to  the  consumer.  For 
a  time  Charles  R.  Wilson  attended  to  the  mill  end  of  the  business  but  later  after 
they  sold  the  boat  both  he  and  his  brother  gave  their  attention  to  the  conduct  of 
the  mill  and  the  management  of  the  lumberyard.  They  owned  timber  land  near 
Rainier,  but  when  all  of  the  timber  was  finally  cut  they  left  that  district  and  in 
1887  went  to  Aberdeen.  The  site  of  the  present  extensive  mill  now  owned  by 
the  firm  of  Wilson  Brothers  &  Company  was  secured  through  the  assistance  of 
Sam  Benn  and  A.  J.  West.  The  history  of  the  success  of  the  plant  shows  a 
wonderful  growth  resulting  from  the  untiring  industry,  the  keen  sagacity  and 
business  ability  of  the  brothers,  who  bviilt  up  a  business  of  very  extensive  and 


CHARLES  R.  WILSOX 


I  PUBLIC  UBRAR^^' 


ASTOR,    LENOX 
TILDEN  FOUNDATION   l 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  295 

profitable  proportions.  During  the  widespread  financial  panic  of  1893  they  kept 
their  mill  in  operation  and  paid  higher  salaries  to  men  than  any  other  mill  on  the 
coast,  thus  enabling  many  a  man  to  tide  over  the  hard  times.  With  the  gradual 
development  of  their  trade  theirs  became  one  of  the  leading  mills  in  the  state  and 
the  business  scarcely  second  to  any  in  Washington. 

On  the  2ist  of  November,  1878,  Mr.  Wilson  was  married  to  Miss  Margaret 
Moar,  of  Portland,  Oregon,  and  to  them  were  born  the  following  children : 
Charles  R.,  who  died  in  infancy;  Carrie  E.,  the  deceased  wife  of  F.  W.  Loomis,  of 
Aberdeen;  Jonathan  H. ;  William  C. ;  Ruby  M. ;  Robert  R.,  deceased;  Margaret 
A. ;  Helen  M.,  and  George  Dewey.  Those  living  are  all  yet  at  home  with  the 
mother  and  the  sons  are  looking  after  the  business.  The  husband  and  father 
passed  away  on  the  15th  of  August,  1908.  The  family  reside  in  Aberdeen  and 
Mrs.  Wilson  has  erected  one  of  the  most  beautiful  homes  in  the  city. 

Mr.  Wilson  long  ranked  as  one  of  the  foremost  business  men  of  Aberdeen. 
He  served  on  the  city  council  for  one  term  and  during  that  time  the  city  hall  was 
erected.  He  was  a  member  of  the  building  committee  and  was  also  instrumental 
in  having  the  new  bridge  at  Heron  street  across  the  Whishkah  river  made  free. 
The  first  bridge  was  a  toll  bridge.  He  possessed  many  splendid  traits  of  character, 
was  devoted  to  the  welfare  of  his  city,  his  loyalty  being  manifest  in  many  tangible 
ways,  was  sincere  and  ardent  in  his  friendships  and  w^as  a  most  devoted  husband 
and  father.  High  regard  was  entertained  for  him  wherever  he  was  known  and 
those  things  which  make  life  worth  living  came  to  him  in  abundant  measure  as 
the  result  of  his  ability,  so  that  he  never  had  occasion  to  regret  his  determination 
to  leave  his  native  land  and  try  his  fortune  in  America. 


FRANK  E.  FROST. 


Frank  E.  Frost,  treasurer  of  the  Bloedel  Donovan  Lumber  Mills  of  Belling- 
ham,  was  born  in  Clarion,  Iowa,  May  6th,  1884,  ^  son  of  E.  J.  and  Henrietta 
Frost.  The  father  was  engaged  in  the  operating  department  of  the  Chicago, 
Rock  Island  &  Pacific  Railroad  at  Clarion,  Iowa,  for  many  years  but  retired  from 
active  business  connectioris  in  1906  and  is  now  making  his  home  with  his  son 
Frank. 

The  latter  attended  the  public  and  high  schools  of  his  native  city  and  after- 
ward entered  the  employ  of  the  Chicago,  Rock  Island  &  Pacific  Railroad  as  a 
clerk  in  the  freight  department,  where  he  remained  for  a  year.  At  the  expiration 
of  that  period  he  removed  to  Bellingham,  Washington,  and  entered  the  employ 
of  Fred  Kenoyer,  who  operated  a  lumber  mill,  having  charge  of  the  yard  and 
sales  for  two  years.  He  then  went  to  Oakland.  California,  and  attended  the 
Polytechnic  Business  College  for  five  months,  after  which  lie  went  to  Seattle 
and  was  a  student  in  Wilson's  Business  College  for  a  month.  1  \v  next  worked 
for  the  Chicago  &  Great  Western  Railroad  as  stenographer  and  traffic  man 
until  July,  1908,  when  he  returned  to  Bellingham  and  became  a  stenographer 
with  the  Larson  Lumber  Company,  occupying  that  position  for  two  years.  At 
the  expiration  of  that  period  he  accepted  the  position  of  bookkeeper  for  the 
Lake   Whatcom   Logging   Company   and   the   Larson   Lumber   Company,    which 


296  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

ivere  all  the  same  people,  and  when  the  latter  company  was  reorganized  on  the 
ist  of  April,  1913,  under  the  name  of  the  Bloedel  Donovan  Lumber  Mills, 
Mr.  Frost  was  elected  to  its  treasurership  and  is  now  in  charge  of  its  finances 
and  otherwise  active  in  its  management  and  control. 

On  the  20th  of  November,  1907,  Mr.  Frost  was  married  in  Bellingham  to 
Miss  Emma  I.  Seelye,  and  they  are  now  the  parents  of  three  children:  Dorothy, 
'  Helen  and  Katharyn,  aged  eight,  six  and  four  years,  respectively. 

Mr.  Frost  is  a  republican  in  his  political  views  but  not  an  aspirant  for  office, 
preferring  to  concentrate  his  energies  on  his  business  afifairs,  which  are  well 
directed  and  are  of  growing  importance.  The  steps  in  the  way  of  his  progres- 
sion are  easily  discernible  and  steadily  he  has  advanced  until  he  is  now  active 
in  the  control  of  one  of  Bellingham's  substantial  commercial  enterprises. 


THOMAS  A.  CASEY. 


Thomas  A.  Casey,  engaged  in  the  real  estate  business  in  Sultan,  was  born  in 
Fond  du  Lac,  Wisconsin,  ^lay  10.  1856.  His  father,  James  Casey,  a  native  of 
Ireland,  came  to  America  on  a  sailing  vessel,  being  three  months  en  route  from 
County  Meath  to  New  York.  He  arrived  in  the  new  world  during  the  latter 
'30s  or  early  '40s  and  for  a  time  remained  a  resident  of  the  Empire  state.  He 
afterward  became  a  pioneer  settler  of  Wisconsin.  He  was  a  well  educated  man 
who  in  early  life  had  qualified  for  work  as  an  engraver,  but  after  removing  to 
the  middle  west  he  followed  agricultural  pursuits.  He  was  very  active  in  politics 
and  was  a  loyal  member  of  the  Roman  Catholic  church.  He  married  Maria 
Reburn,  who  was  born  in  County  Meath,  Ireland,  and  both  passed  away  in  Wis- 
consin, the  former  at  the  age  of  fifty-six  years,  while  the  latter  died  in  18(89,  ^^ 
the  age  of  seventy-two. 

Thomas  A.  Casey  was  the  ninth  in  order  of  birth  in  their  family  of  ten 
children.  He  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Fond  du  Lac,  Wisconsin, 
but  his  opportunities  were  quite  limited,  as  he  had  the  privilege  of  attending  only 
until  he  reached  the  age  of  nine.  He  then  began  to  earn  his  own  livelihood  and 
was  first  employed  in  a  shingle  mill,  packing  shingles -at  a  wage  of  a  dollar  per 
day.  During  much  of  his  life  he  has  been  connected  with  the  business  of  shingle 
making.  In  1872  he  learned  the  molder's  trade  but  only  followed  it  for  three 
years  or  through  the  time  of  his  apprenticeship.  He  arrived  in  Washington  in 
1889  and  first  located  at  Tacoma,  after  which  he  removed  to  Buckley,  where  in 
connection  with  H.  C.  Knowles  he  begun  the  manufacture  of  shingles,  which  he 
followed  until  1899  o^  ^or  about  eight  years.  He  then  sold  his  interests  at  that 
place  and  removed  to  Sultan,  where  he  built  a  large  shingle  mill,  conducting 
business  under  the  name  of  the  Tom  Casey  Mill  Company.  His  interests  were 
incorporated  and  Mr.  Casey -was  president  of  the  company.  He  conducted  that 
mill  for  about  three  years,  after  which  he  entered  the  real  estate  and  insurance 
business,  in  which  he  has  since  been  successfully  engaged,  negotiating  many  im- 
portant property  transfers.  He  was  also  one  of  the  organizers  and  was  for  two 
years  the  secretary  of  the  Citizens  Bank  of  Sulton,  in  which  connection  he  has 
since  continued. 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  297 

At  Luclington,  Michigan,  Mr.  Casey  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Hermine 
Herrgesell,  a  native  of  Germany  and  a  daughter  of  Anton  and  Frances  Herrgesell, 
both  of  whom  are  deceased.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Casey  have  been  born  the  fol- 
lowing children :  Aletta,  wife  of  G.  G.  Smart  of  Everett,  who  is  roadmaster  for 
the  Great  Northern  Railway;  Mildred,  the  wife  of  Roy  F.  Smith,  of  Skykomish, 
who  is  a  conductor  on  the  Great  Northern  Railway;  Vera,  the  wife  of  Joseph 
Chassiam,  of  Monroe,  Washington,  who  is  employed  as  foreman  by  the  Wagner 
&  Wilson  Lumber  Company;  Irma,  who  gave  her  hand  in  marriage  to  E.  B. 
Farrow ;  T.  Reburn ;  Robert  E. ;  and  two  who  are  deceased. 

Mr.  Casey  was  made  a  Mason  in  Monroe,  Washington,  and  afterward  be- 
came one  of  the  organizers  of  the  Masonic  lodge  in  Sultan.  He  belongs  to  the 
Sultan  Commercial  Club,  having  taken  an  active  part  in  its  organization  and  in 
instituting  many  movements  put  forth  by  the  club  for  the  city's  improvement, 
especially  in  street  and  bridge  building.  In  politics  he  is  an  earnest  democrat 
and  for  the  past  three  years  has  been  city  treasurer  of  Sultan,  which  position  he 
is  now  capably  filling.  He  is  also  chairman  of  the  board  of  education  of  district 
No.  30  and  clerk  of  high  school  board  No.  100.  He  wields  a  wide  influence 
over  public  thought  and  action,  for  it  is  recognized  that  his  opinions  are  sound 
and  that  he  is  most  public-spirited  at  all  times.  Starting  out  to  earn  his  own 
living  when  a  lad  of  but  nine  years,  he  is  today  at  the  head  of  business  interests 
of  importance  and  yet  he  has  ever  found  time  to  aid  and  cooperate  in  movements 
that  look  to  the  welfare  and  benefit  of  the  district  in  which  he  lives. 


WILLIAM  JOHN  COLKETT. 

F'or  more  than  three  decades  William  J.  Colkett  has  been  the  assistant  post- 
master of  Seattle  and  no  higher  testimonial  of  his  ability  and  fidelity  could  be 
given  than  the  statement  of  the  fact  that  he  has  remained  in  the  postoffice  for 
thirty-five  years.  The  width  of  the  continent  separates  him  from  his  birthplace, 
for  he  is  a  native  of  Burlington  county,  New  Jersey,  born  April  18,  1857. 

Mr.  Colkett  comes  of  English  and  Scotch  ancestry,  but  for  six  generations 
representatives  of  the  family  have  resided  on  this  side  the  Atlantic.  The  paternal 
grandfather,  Joseph  Colkett,  was  also  a  native  of  New  Jersey,  where  he  devoted 
his  entire  life  to  farming.  His  religious  faith  was  that  of  the  Methodist  church 
and  he  was  one  of  its  prominent  representatives  in  an  early  day.  His  son,  Goldy 
Colkett,  was  born  in  Burlington  county.  New  Jersey,  as  was  the  lady  he  wedded, 
Miss  Mary  Ann  Engle.  The  Engle  immigrant  was  from  Cambridgeshire,  England,' 
and  sailed  from  the  Downs,  England,  April  23,  1682,  on  the  ship  Amity,  arriving 
at  Burlington,  New  Jersey,  in  the  fall  of  that  year.  The  Engles  were  members 
of  the  Society  of  Friends.  In  the  maternal  line  Mary  A.  Engle  was  a  representa- 
tive of  the  Peacock  family  that  traced  its  ancestry  to  Scotland  and  that  was 
established  on  American  soil  at  about  the  same  date  as  the  Engle  family.  Both 
families  were  identified  with  the  Society  of  Friends  until  the  time  of  the  Revolu- 
tionary war,  when,  because  of  their  fighting  blood  and  their  defense  of  American 
interests,  they  were  put  out  of  the  organization,  which  does  not  countenance  war. 
It  was  about  a  hundred  years  after  the  arrival  of  the  Engle  and  Peacock  families 


298  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

in  the  new  world  that  the  Colkett  family  was  established  on  this  side  the  water 
by  an  ancestor  from  Scotland.  The  Colketts  were  of  the  Methodist  faith  and 
both  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Goldy  Colkett  were  loyal  and  devoted  members  of  the  Metho- 
dist church.  The  former  engaged  in  the  painting  and  decorating  business  to  the 
age  of  sixty  years,  when  he  passed  from  this  life.  His  wife  died  at  the  age  of 
sixty-four.  In  their  family  were  five  children,  but  only  two  are  now  living,  the 
daughter  being  Sarah,  now  the  wife  of  J.  S.  W.  Shelton,  of  Shelton,  Mason 
county,  Washington. 

William  J.  Colkett  is  indebted  to  the  public-school  system  of  his  native  state 
for  the  early  educational  advantages  which  he  enjoyed.  He  was  a  youth  of  nine- 
teen years  when  on  the  3d  of  November,  1876,  he  arrived  in  Washington  territory 
with  Coupeville  as  his  destination.  He  had  traveled  westward  by  rail  to  San 
Francisco,  whence  he  sailed  on  the  bark  Tidal  Wave  to  Port  Madison,  induced 
to  this  step  by  the  fact  that  his  father  had  removed  to  Washington  in  1864.  He 
secured  a  position  in  the  store  of  Major  Haller  of  Coupeville  and  occupied  that 
position  for  about  three  years,  also  attending  to  the  work  of  the  postofifice,  which 
was  located  in  the  store.  In  August,  1879,  he  arrived  in  Seattle  and  through  the 
scholastic  year  of  1879-80  was  a  student  in  the  University  of  Washington,  in 
which  he  pursued  a  business  course,  being  the  first  male  graduate  of  that  institu- 
tion. In  June,  1880,  he  entered  the  Seattle  postoffice.  where  he  was  employed  for 
seven  months,  and  during  that  time  had  charge  of  the  office  for  five  months  during 
the  absence  of  the  postmaster.  Later  he  acted  as  bookkeeper  for  the  firm  of 
C.  P.  Stone  &  Company  and  in  1884  he  accepted  the  position  of  assistant  post- 
master of  Seattle.  In  the  meantime  he  had  been  employed  in  the  postoffice  at 
intervals,  each  time  at  an  increase  of  wages.  In  this  connection  a  contemporary 
writer  has  said :  "When  he  first  assumed  the  duties  of  his  present  position  the 
office  was  allowed  twenty-seven  dollars  a  month  for  clerk  hire,  and  Mr.  Colkett 
received  the  entire  amount,  he  performing  the  entire  work  in  the  office,  including 
that  of  sweeping  the  floor.  Close  study  has  given  him  a  keen  insight  into  the 
important  duties  of  his  position,  and  he  has  literally  'grown  up'  with  the  office 
and  is  now  the  able  assistant  of  this  great  office,  with  its  immense  business 
and  its  many  clerks  and  letter  carriers.  He  has  witnessed  the  growth  of  Seattle 
from  a  town  of  three  thousand  inhabitants  to  one  of  over  three  hundred  thousand, 
and  during  this  time  he  has  labored  to  goodly  ends  and  is  leaving  the  impress 
of  his  individuality  upon  the  public  life,  the  substantial  growth  and  the  material 
development  of  the  city."  He  also  has  outside  business  interests  as  a  director 
of  the  Puget  Sound  Savings  &  Loan  Association. 

On  the  28th  of  August,  1884,  Mr.  Colkett  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Clara  Eva  Lombard,  who  is  also  a  graduate  of  the  University  of  Washington, 
having  completed  the  normal  course  in  1880.  She  is  the  daughter  of  Ransom  R. 
and  Emehne  B.  Lombard,  of  Port  Madison,  pioneers  of  Washington,  who  arrived 
in  this  state  from  Maine  in  1863.  They  were  prominent  members  of  the  First 
Baptist  church  of  Seattle,  as  are  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Colkett,  Mr.  Colkett  having  served 
for  years  as  trustee.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Colkett  have  been  bom  five  children, 
Emery  Engle,  Marian  Lombard,  William  John,  Burton  Ransom  and  David  Goldy. 

Mr.  Colkett  served  as  a  member  of  the  Seattle  fire  department  at  a  time  when 
it  was  a  volunteer  organization.  He  also  filled  the  office  of  deputy  sheriff  during 
the  time  of  the  anti-Chinese  riots  and  from  1889  until  1895  ^^  ^^''^s  '^  member  of 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  299 

the  board  of  education,  acting  for  two  years  of  that  time  as  its  president.  While 
he  was  connected  with  the  board  the  school  capacity  of  the  city  was  greatly  in- 
creased by  the  addition  of  one  hundred  rooms  and  he  was  largely  instrumental  in 
securing  the  establishment  of  the  department  of  manual  trainings.  He  has  ever 
favored  progressiveness  in  connection  with  educational  methods  and  opportunities 
and  the  schools  have  indeed  found  in  him  a  stalwart  champion.  For  eleven  years 
he  was  a  member  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  where  he  served  for  two  terms 
as  trustee,  and  cooperated  in  all  the  plans  and  measures  of  that  organization  for 
the  benefit  and  upbuilding  of  the  city. 


NATHANIEL  J.  REDPATH,  M.  D. 

Dr.  Nathaniel  J.  Redpath,  of  Olympia,  ranks  among  the  most  .progressive  and 
successful  physicians  and  surgeons  of  the  city  and  is  held  in  high  esteem  by  both 
the  general  public  and  his  professional  brethren.  He  was  born  in  Monticello, 
Cowlitz  county,  Washington,  on  a  ranch  which  is  now  included  within  the  limits  of 
the  town  of  Kelso.  His  natal  day  was  January  19,  i860,  and  he  is  a  son  of  James 
and  P.  C.  (Ostrander)  Redpath.  His  father  was  born  and  reared  in  Illinois  but  in 
early  manhood  joined  a  company  of  emigrants  and  crossed  the  plains  by  ox  team 
to  the  Pacific  coast,  settling  in  what  is  now  Cowlitz  county,  Washington.  He 
was  married  there  and  took  up  his  residence  upon  a  ranch,  where  he  engaged  in 
farming,  and  also  bought  and  sold  cattle,  which  he  drove  to  points  in  Puget  Sound 
and  to  Victoria,  F>ritish  Columbia.  In  1866  he  removed  with  his  family  to  Albany. 
Oregon,  where  he  passed  away  three  years  later.  In  1880  his  widow  became 
the  wife  of  C.  B.  Montague.  He  was  one  of  the  pioneers  of  the  state  and  did  his 
part  toward  reclaiming  this  once  wild  region  for  civilization.  Had  there  not  been 
men  such  as  he,  willing  to  endure  the  hardships  and  the  privations  necessary  to 
the  opening  up  of  a  new  country,  the  commonwealth  of  Washington  would  not 
be  today  the  prosperous  and  advanced  state  that  it  is. 

Nathaniel  J.  Redpath  attended  the  public  schools  of  Albany,  Oregon,  and  later 
Albany  College  and  when  eighteen  years  old  secured  a  position  as  clerk  in  a 
drug  store  at  Albany.  When  twenty-two  years  old  he  removed  tQ  Olympia,  Wash- 
ington, and  for  a  year  studied  medicine  with  his  grandfather,  Dr.  Nathaniel 
Ostrander.  Later  he  entered  the  medical  school  of  Willamette  University  at  Port- 
land and  after  spending  a  year  there  went  to  Philadeli)hia  and  became  a  student 
in  Jefferson  Medical  College,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  1887.  Following 
his  return  to  Olympia  he  engaged  in  the  private  practice  of  medicine  for  six  months 
and  then  received  the  appointment  of  assistant  superintendent  of  the  State  Insane 
Asylum  at  Fort  Steilacoom.  He  filled  that  position  for  a  period  of  ten  years 
and  then  returned  to  Olympia,  where  he  has  since  gained  a  large  and  representa- 
tive practice.  Fie  is  also  on  the  staff  of  St.  Peter's  Hospital.  Through  his  mem- 
bership in  the  Thurston  County  and  the  Washington  State  Medical  Societies, 
the  American  Medical  Association,  the  Clinical  Congress  of  Surgeons  of  North 
America  and  the  Northwest  Surgical  Association  he  keeps  in  close  touch  with  the 
advance  in  knowledge  of  the  profession.  Fie  is  thoroughly  conscientious  in  the 
performance  of  his  duties  as  a  physician  and  surgeon  and  his  skill  is  generally 


300  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

recognized.  Unlike  many  professional  men,  he  possesses  marked  business  ability 
and  is  now  president  of  the  Pacific  Coast  Investment  Company. 

Dr.  Redpath  was  married  in  Olympia,  in  February,  1903,  to  Miss  Lucy  E. 
Maynard  and  they  have  two  children :  Katharine,  who  is  attending  a  Sisters' 
school;  and  Nathaniel  J.,  Jr.,  aged  five  years. 

The  Doctor  gives  his  political  allegiance  to  the  democratic  party  but  has  never 
sought  office.  He  belongs  to  the  Mas.ons  and  to  Afifi  Temple  of  the  Mystic  Shrine 
and  is  likewise  connected  with  the  Woodmen  of  the  World,  the  Elks,  the  Tacoma 
Golf  and  Country  Club  and  the  Olympia  Golf  Club.  His  public  spirit  and  con- 
cern for  the  advancement  of  his  city  are  manifested  in  his  membership  in  the 
Olympia  Chamber  of  Commerce. 


JOHN  W.  STRU.BEL. 


John  W.  Strubel,  secretary-treasurer  of  the  incorporated  firm  of  Strubel  & 
Glancey,  conducting  an  extensive  grocery  business  in  Elma,  has  been  a  resident 
of  that  place  since  October  20,  1883,  and  throughout  the  intervening  years  his 
business  interests  have  increased  in  volume  and  importance,  making  him  an  active 
factor  in  the  commercial  development  of  the  town.  Today  he  is  regarded  as  one 
of  its  most  successful  citizens  owing  to  his  indefatigable  efifort  and  the  long  hours 
given  to  his  work.  Ohio  claims  him  as  a  native  son,  his  birth  having  occurred 
in  her  capital  city  of  Columbus  on  the  30th  of  May,  1861.  His  father,  John 
Strubel,  was  born  on  the  Rhine,  in  Germany,  and  in  i860  was  married  in  Colum- 
bus, Ohio,  to  Miss  Mary  Wengert.  They  came  to  the  northwest  following  the 
removal  of  their  son,  John  W.  Strubel,  and  both  pass'ed  away  in  Elma.  The 
other  children  of  their  family  are  Cyrus  O.  and  Mrs.  Annie  Wilkinson,  also  resi- 
dents of  Elma. 

During  his  early  boyhood  John  W.  Strubel  had  the  opportunity  of  attending 
the  country  schools  for  but  three  months  in  the  year.  His  parents  removed  to 
Iowa  during  his  early  boyhood  and  there  he  was  reared  and  educated.  At  the 
age  of  twelve  years  he  turned  his  attention  to  farm  work  and  when  a  young  man  of 
nineteen  he  left  home  with  but  seventy  cents  in  his  pocket.  He  was  employed 
at  farm  labor  in  Iowa  imtil  1883,  when  he  came  to  the  west,  arriving  in  Elma 
on  the  20th  of  October.  He  was  engaged  in  driving  stage,  in  freighting  and  in 
logging  until  1887  and  through  the  intervening  period  of  four  years  practiced  close 
economy  and  industry  in  order  to  obtain  a  sum  sufficient  to  enable  him  to  engage 
in  business  on  his  own  account,  to  which  step  his  ambition  prompted  him.  It  was 
on  the  lOth  of  August,  1887,  that,  in  connection  with  D.  L.  Woodland,  he  opened 
a  grocery  store,  bending  every  energy  toward  the  upbuilding  and  successful  con- 
duct of  the  business.  Later  his  brother,  F.  W.  Strubel,  succeeded  Mr.  Wood- 
land, becoming  a  partner  in  1893,  and  afterward  Mr.  Glancey  purchased  a  third 
interest.  Later  J.  W.  Strubel  and  Mr.  Glancey  acquired  the  interest  of  F.  W. 
Strubel  and  have  since  incorporated  the  business  with  Mr.  Glancey  as  president, 
^Tr.  Grayson  as  its  vice  president  and  J.  W.  Strubel  as  secretary-treasurer.  The 
business  has  been  developed  along  most  gratifying  lines  and  in  addition  to  the 
Elma  establishment  they  own  a  branch  store  at  McCleary.     Mr.  Strubel  is  also 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  301 

the  owner  of  a  half  interest  in  the  Wakefield  Hotel.  He  was  the  proprietor  of 
the  first  meat  market  in  Elma  and  he  obtained  the  contract  to  supply  meat  for 
the  force  of  men  who  were  engaged  in  building  the  Northern  Pacific  Railroad 
through  to  the  Harbor.  This  gave  his  business  a  big  start.  His  success  has 
resulted  from  hard  work,  long  hours,  indefatigable  industry  and  unfaltering 
enterprise.  Today  the  company  employs  fifteen  men  and  the  business  amounts 
to  two  hundred  thousand  dollars  annually. 

In  June,  1888,  was  celebrated  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Strubel  and  Miss  Florence 
B.  Lawrence,  a  native  of  Illinois,  and  they  have  become  the  parents  of  four  chil- 
dren, Bessie  I.,  Clarence  B.,  Earle  R.  and  Jessie. 

Mr.  Strubel  is  independent  in  politics  and  liberal  in  h\s  religious  views,  having 
contributed  to  the  support  of  all  churches.  He  is  today  the  only  surviving  char- 
ter member  of  the  Knights  of  Pythias  lodge  at  Elma  and  he  is  also  connected 
with  the  Woodmen  of  the  World.  He  has  been  a  member  of  the  school  board 
has  been  president  of  the  Merchants  Association,  and  for  several  terms  has  been 
a  member  of  the  city  council,  in  which  office  he  is  still  an  incumbent.  His  activi- 
ties along  these  various  lines  indicate  his  interest  in  the  public  progress  and  wel- 
fare and  there  is  no  plan  or  measure  which  is  featured  for  the  benefit  of  the  com- 
munity that  does  not  receive  his  endorsement  and  support. 


SYLVESTER  a  BUELL. 

Sylvester  G.  Buell,  manager  of  the  Arlington  Cooperative  Creamery  Company 
at  Arlington,  Snohomish  county,  was  born  at  Warsaw,  Indiana,  September  12, 
1857,  a  son  of  Joseph  and  Anna  (Greider)  Buell,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of 
Pennsylvania,  where  they  were  reared  and  educated.  In  1836  the  father  made 
his  way  westward  to  Indiana  and  the  Greider  family  removed  to  that  state  in  1848. 
settling  in  Noble  county.  The  home  of  the  Buell  family  was  established  in  Kosci- 
usko county  and  later  in  life  the  father  there  engaged  in  farming  but  at  the  time 
of  the  Civil  war  all  business  and  personal  considerations  were  put  aside  and  he 
responded  to  the  country's  call  for  troops,  enlisting  as  a  member  of  Company  B, 
One  Hundred  and  Fifty-second  Indiana  Volunteers.  He  died  while  in  the  service, 
passing  away  in  1865  at  the  age  of  forty.  His  widow  survived  for  more  than  fou." 
decades  and  was  called  to  her  final  rest  in  1906  at  the  age  of  seventy-six  years, 
departing  this  life  at  her  old  Indiana  home. 

Sylvester  G.  Buell  was  the  second  in  order  of  birth  in  a  family  of  live  chil- 
dren. In  his  youth  he  attended  the  country  schools  and  for  a  time  was  a  pupil 
in  an  Ohio  school,  but  when  his  textbooks  were  put  aside  he  took  up  railroad 
work,  entering  the  employ  of  the  Santa  Fe  Railway  Com])any  and  afterward  tjie 
NortlTcrn  Pacific  Railway  Company.  He  was  thus  associated  for  twenty-five 
years,  operating  in  New  Mexico,  Kansas  and  AX'ashington.  It  was  in  1892  that 
he  came  to  western  Washington,  locating  at  Arlington,  wliere  he  spent  a  year. 
He  afterward  remained  for  six  years  at  Sumas.  Washington,  and  then  returned 
to  Arlington,  where  he  has  since  made  his  home.  He  was  agent  for  the  Northerf. 
Pacific  Railway  Company  at  that  place  and  his  fellow  townsmen,  appreciative 
of  his  worth  and  ability,  called  him  to  the  office  of  county  commissioner,  which 


302  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

position  he  filled  for  six  years.  During  that  time  the  Arlington  Cooperative 
Creamery  Company  was  organized  in  1901  and  entered  upon  an  era  of  profitable 
existence.  Mr.  Buell  became  interested  in  the  project  in  191 1  and  has  since  been 
treasurer  and  manager  of  the  company  as  well  as  one  of  its  directors.  Under  his 
control  the  business  has  been  increased  to  extensive  proportions  and  the  under- 
taking is  today  one  of  the  profitable  concerns  of  the  kind  in  western  Washington. 

On  the  ist  of  June,  1887,  occurred  the  marriage  of  'Sir.  Buell  and  Miss  Blanche 
Stearns,  who  was  born  at  Peru,  Kansas,  a  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sheldon 
Stearns,  both  of  whom  have  passed  away.  The  two  children  of  this  marriage 
are:  Mrs.  Elsie  Thomas,  who  was  born  at  Cedar  Vale,  Kansas,  in  1891  and  now 
resides  in  Arlington ;  and  Leslie  C,  who  was  born  in  Sumas,  Washington,  in 
1893,  and  is  now  working  for  the  Northern  Pacific  Railway  Company.  The 
daughter,  Mrs.  Thomas,  has  two  children,  Jean  and  Joyce. 

Mr.  Buell  belongs  to  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  .Ajnerica  and  has  been  audit- 
ing steward  in  his  local  lodge.  His  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican 
party  and  he  keeps  well  informed  on  the  questions  and  issues  of  the  day,  believing 
firmly  in  its  principles.  His  has  been  an  active  and  useful  life  fraught  with 
good  results  and  his  energy  has  been  a  potent  element  in  his  continued  advance- 
ment. 


HUBERT  J.  ELLIS. 


Hubert  J.  Ellis,  of  Raymond,  needs  no  introduction  to  the  readers  of  this 
volume,  for  the  name  of  Ellis  has  long  been  a  familiar  one  to  all  v/ho  are  in  any 
way  familiar  with  the  history  of  Willapa  harbor.  He  is  now  engaged  in  the 
conduct  of  an  important  towing  business  as  a  partner  in  the  Standard  Towboat 
Company,  in  which  he  is  associated  with  Alma  Smith,  mentioned  elsewhere  in  this 
work.  He  was  born  in  Wisconsin,  May  12,  1868,  a  son  of  William  Ellis,  who  was 
a  native  of  Connecticut  and  a  graduate  of  Yale  University  and  of  the  Harvey 
Medical  College.  Removing  to  the  middle  west,  the  father  practiced  his  pro- 
fession in  Wisconsin  and  in  Kansas  until  1882,  when  he  made  his  way  to  the 
Pacific  northwest,  settling  at  what  is  now  known  as  Ellis  Gardens  tracts.  He 
purchased  one  hundred  and  seventeen  acres  of  land  from  the  railroad  company 
and  this  he  cleared  of  the  timber,  after  which  he  added  many  improvements.  He 
there  raised  some  fine  stock  in  addition  to  the  cultivation  of  cereals  best  adapted 
to  soil  and  climate,  and  thereon  he  made  his  home  until  his  death,  which  occurred 
in  1905,  when  he  was  eighty-three  years  of  age.  He  was  a  very  public-spirited 
and  progressive  citizen  as  well  as  business  man,  and  his  cooperation  was  a  most 
helpful  element  in  promoting  general  progress  and  improvement  along  many  lines. 
His  wife,  who  bore  the  maiden  name  of  Phoebe  Jane  Bosh,  was  a  native  of  Illi- 
nois, and  they  became  the  parents  of  eight  children,  seven  of  whom  are  yet 
living  and  are  residents  of  Washington.  The  wife  and  mother  passed  away 
in  1914. 

Hubert  J.  Ellis  was  educated  in  the  little  old  pioneer  school  in  Raymond,  which 
was  made  of  fir  planks  sawed  on  the  banks  of  the  Willapa  river  in  a  water  power 
mill  which  stood  a  few  feet  from  where  the  school  building  was  erected.  This 
building  was  sixteen  by  fourteen  feet,  with  a  window  and  door  on  the  west  side 


HUBERT  J.  ELLIS 


t    THE   NEW   TORK 
j  PUBLIC  library! 

;  ASTOR,    LENOX  I 

TILDEN   FOUND ATtOM  ; 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  305 

and  a  window  on  the  south  side.  The  seats  were  fir  planks.  The  school  stood 
about  five  hundred  feet  east  of  the  present  Riverdale  school  building.  After 
mastering  the  branches  of  learning  taught  in  that  early  school  H.  J.  Ellis  took  up 
the  work  of  logging,  which  he  followed  on  Willapa  harbor  for  a  few  years,  and 
in  19x0  he  joined  x\lma  Smith  in  organizing  the  Standard  Towboat  Company. 
They  became  owners  of  the  Reliance,  later  acquired  the  Raymond,  afterward  the 
Fearless  and  later  added  a  fourth  boat,  the  Daring,  all  of  which  they  still  own 
and  operate.  They  do  a  general  log  towing  business  on  contract,  delivering  logs 
from  boom  to  mill,  and  their  thoroughness,  reliability  and  promptness  have 
secured  to  them  a  liberal  and  growing  patronage  which  has  made  their  business 
an  important  one.  From  time  to  time  Mr.  Ellis  has  not  only  recognized  but 
utilized  opportunity  for  judicious  and  profitable  investment  in  real  estate  and  is 
now  the  owner  of  considerable  improved  property  in  Raymond  and  vicinity. 

In  Raymond,  in  1901,  Mr.  Ellis  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Annie  M. 
Johnson,  a  native  of  South  Dakota  and  a  daughter  of  Hagen  Johnson,  who  was 
engaged  in  ranching  in  Pacific  county  for  a  number  of  years.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Ellis 
have  two  children,  Mildred  A.  and  Laverna  Lee.  Fraternally  ^^^Ir.  Ellis  is  con- 
nected with  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks 
and  his  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican  party.  He  is  a  representative 
of  a  well  known  pioneer  family  of  this  section  of  the  state,  and  Ellis  avenue  in 
Raymond,  Ellis  lagoon  and  Ellis  Gardens  were  all  named  in  honor  of  his  father. 
For  more  than  a  third  of  a  century  H.  J.  Ellis  has  witnessed  the  growth  and 
development  of  this  section  of  the  country,  and  throughout  the  entire  period  of 
his  manhood  he  has  been  an  active  participant  in  many  movements  which  have 
been  directly  beneficial  in  the  upbuilding  of  this  section  of  the  state. 


CALVIN  S.  BARLOW. 


Calvin  S.  Barlow  is  the  president  of  the  Tacoma  Trading  Company,  dealers 
in  all  kinds  of  building  materials,  and  this  is  one  of  the  leading  firms  in  its  line 
in  Tacoma.  Mr.  Barlow  is  a  product  of  the  northwest  and  possesses  the  enter- 
prising spirit  which  has  been  the  dominant  factor  in  the  development  of  this 
section  of  the  country.  He  was  born  in  Cowlitz  county.  Washington,  May  11, 
1856,  a  son  of  George  Barlow,  a  native  of  New  York  and  a  grandson  of  Nathan 
Barlow,  who  spent  his  entire  life  in  the  Empire  state.  George  Barlow  removed 
to  the  west,  becoming  one  of  the  pioneers  of  Michigan  in  1830.  He  married 
Mary  Purdy,  also  a  native  of  New  York,  who  in  her  early  girlhood  accompanied 
her  parents  to  Michigan,  the  family  settling  near  Detroit.  The  Purdys  were  of 
Scotch-Irish  lineage  and  were  among  the  early  American  settlers,  while  ancestors 
of  C.  S.  Barlow  on  both  the  Purdy  and  Barlow  sides  participated  in  the  Revo- 
lutionary war.  The  Barlow  family  came  from  England  and  was  founded  in 
America  about  1635  by  one  George  Barlow,  whose  father  was  a  bishop  of  the 
Church  of  England.  In  the  year  1852  George  Barlow  came  witli  his  family  to 
Washington,  traveling  with  ox  team  and  wagon  across  the  country  with  a  party 
that  was  en  route  for  six  months,  meeting  the  usual  hardships  of  that  long  and 
tedious  journey  across  the  plains  and  through  the  mountain   passes.     He  first 


Vol.  11—18 


306  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

made  his  way  to  Portland,  Oregon,  then  a  tiny  village,  and  in  1854  he  became 
a  resident  of  Cowlitz  county,  Washington,  where  he  continued  throughout  his 
remaining  days.  By  trade  he  was  a  carpenter  but  during  the  greater  part  of 
his  life  followed  agricultural  pursuits.  He  served  as  county  commissioner  for 
one  term  and  was  also  a  candidate  for  the  legislature  on  the  democratic  ticket. 
In  fact  he  took  an  active  interest  in  politics  and  did  everything  in  his  power  to 
promote  the  growth  of  his  party.  He  was  a  prominent  Mason  and  exemplified 
in  his  life  the  beneficent  spirit  of  the  craft.  He  died  in  the  year  1887,  at  the 
age  of  seventy-nine,  while  his  wife  passed  away  in  Cowlitz  county  in  1864,  at 
the  age  of  fifty-one  years,  her  birth  having  occurred  in  1813.  In  the  family 
were  nine  children,  two  of  whom  died  in  early  life.  Only  three  are  now  living, 
the  brother  being  Byron,  a  resident  of  Kelso,  Washington,  while  the  sister  is 
Mrs.  Theresa  Downing,  the  wife  of  R.  W.  Downing,  of  Vancouver,  Washington. 

Calvin  S.  Barlow,  the  youngest  of  the  surviving  members  of  the  family, 
pursued  his  education  in  the  schools  of  Forest  Grove,  Oregon,  and  spent  one 
year  in  college  there.  His  early  environment  and  experiences  were  those  of  the 
farm,  on  which  he  rendered  active  assistance  to  his  father  until  he  reached  the 
age  of  eighteen  years.  He  was  then  employed  in  connection  with  fishing  pur- 
suits on  the  Columbia  river  and  in  September,  1877,  he  arrived  in  Tacoma  a 
comparative  stranger  and  without  the  assistance  of  influential  friends  began 
business  here.  He  formed  a  partnership  with  his  brother  Byron  in  the  butcher- 
ing business,  they  being  the  first  to  engage  in  that  line  in  what  was  then  the 
new  town.  They  operated  successfully  for  three  years  and  then  established  the 
Tacoma  Trading  Company,  a  copartnership.  The  following  year,  or  in  1893, 
the  business  was  incorporated  with  Calvin  S.  Barlow  as  the  secretary.  He  is 
now  president  and  his  son,  George  C.  Barlow,  is  the  secretary.  The  company 
engages  in  the  sale  of  building  materials  of  all  kinds  and  they  are  among  the 
leading  firms  in  their  line.  In  fact  Mr.  Barlow  has  been  connected  with  this 
business  for  a  longer  period  than  any  other  resident  of  Tacoma  and  the  volume 
of  his  trade  places  him  among  the  most  successful  dealers  in  his  field. 

On  the  28th  of  April,  1881.  at  Mount  Coffin,  Cowlitz  county,  Mr.  Barlow  was 
married  to  Miss  Hertilla  M.  Burr,  who  was  born  in  that  county  March  11,  i860, 
a  daughter  of  Henry  T.  and  Anna  (La  Du)  Burr,  who  were  pioneers  of  the 
state,  where  the  family  arrived  in  1848  after  a  trip  of  one  hundred  and  three 
days  which  brought  them  around  the  Horn.  Mrs.  Burr  is  of  French  lineage, 
representing  an  old  New  York  family  founded  in  the  new  world  after  the 
massacre  of  St.  Bartholomew.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Barlow  have  become  the  parents 
of  eight  children:  George  C,  who  was  born  April  5,  1882,  and  was  married  in 
Tacoma,  in  1907,  to  Helen  Jamison;  Harry  L.,  who  was  born  April  21,  1885, 
and  died  in  August,  1887;  Byron  T.,  who  was  born  February  i,  1888,  and  died 
in  April.  1889;  Allan,  who  was  born  August  15,  1890,  and  was  married  in 
Tacoma.  in  1915,  to  Nan  Farrell ;  Russell  C,  whose  natal  day  was  November 
10.  1893;  Douglas  L.,  who  was  born  December  23,  1895,  and  was  married  June 
28,  1916,  to  Lucile  Bartlett;  Hertilla,  born  June  7,  1898;  and  Mildred  M.,  born 
December  29,  1901. 

In  politics  Mr.  Barlow  is  a  republican,  active  in  support  of  party  principles. 
His  opinions  carry  weight  in  party  councils  and  he  does  everything  in  his  power 
to  promote  republican  successes.     Twice  he  has  been  honored  with  election  to 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  307 

the  state  legislature,  first  in  1907  and  again  in  1915.  As  a  member  of  the  house 
he  gave  earnest  consideration  to  all  questions  which  came  up  for  settlement  and 
was  active  in  promoting  much  needed  legislation.  He  became  one  of  the  early 
members  of  the  Knights  of  Pythias  lodge  in  Tacoma  and  is  identified  also  with 
the  Maccabees,  the  Odd  Fellows  and  the  United  Artisans.  He  is  a  faithful 
member  of  the  First  Methodist  church  and  he  is  serving  as  curator  of  the 
Washington  Historical  Society.  Few  residents  of  Tacoma  can  claim  sixty 
years'  connection  with  the  state  and  almost  forty  years  with  the  city.  Mr.  Bar- 
low, however,  has  always  resided  in  Washington  and  has  not  only  been  an 
interested  witness  of  the  changes  which  have  occurred  but  has  also  actively 
participated  in  the  work  of  general  progress  and  improvement,  recognizing  at 
all  times  the  duties  and  obligations  as  well  as  the  privileges  of  citizenship.  As 
a  business  man  he  has  displayed  thorough  reliability  as  well  as  enterprise  and 
in  many  ways  he  has  contributed  to  the  material,  political  and  moral  develop- 
ment of  the  community. 


JAMES  H.  NAYLOR. 


From  the  period  of  pioneer  development  to  the  present  James  H.  Naylor  has 
been  interested  in  Everett  and  its  upbuilding  and  is  now  active  at  the  bar  as  a 
successful  attorney  of  Snohomish  county.  He  was  born  at  Forest  Grove,  Ore- 
gon, August  I,  1848,  and  is  a  son  of  Thomas  G.  Naylor,  a  native  of  Virginia 
and  a  grandson  of  Hiram  Naylor,  a  member  of  an  old  Virginia  family  of  English 
origin  founded  in  America  during  the  earliest  epoch  in  the  settlement  of  the 
Old  Dominion.  In  the  year  1843  Thomas  G.  Naylor  left  Virginia  and  made  an 
overland  trip  through  the  Indian  country  in  a  prairie  schooner  to  Oregon,  reach- 
ing his  destination  after  a  six  months'  journey  fraught  with  various  hardships 
and  privations.  He  at  length  reached  what  is  now  Forest  Grove,  then  kno.wn 
as  Tualitin  Plains,  and  there  he  and  his  wife  took  up  a  donation  claim  of  six 
hundred  and  forty  acres.  In  later  years  he  gave  eighty  acres  of  that  tract  to 
the  Pacific  University  for  an  endowment.  From  the  time  of  the  establishment 
of  that  school  he  served  as  one  of  its  trustees  until  his  death,  which  occurred 
at  Forest  Grove  in  1870.  when  he  was  sixty-nine  years  of  age.  He  was  also  one 
of  the  promoters  of  the  first  State  Agricultural  Society  of  Oregon,  which  held 
fairs  near  Oregon  City  and  subsequently  at  Salem,  Oregon.  In  order  to  get  good 
live  stock  into  the  country  he  paid  three  hundred  dollars  a  head  for  French  and 
Spani.sh  Merino  sheep  that  were  sent  in  from  the  Stock  well  Farm  of  California. 
Fie  also  paid  one  hundred  and  twenty-five  dollars  per  stand  of  ])ccs  and  thus 
he  contributed  in  substantial  measure  to  the  progressive  development  of  farming 
and  allied  interests  in  the  state.  Before  his  death  he  developed  one  of  the  finest 
farms  in  Oregon  and  was  extensively  engaged  in  the  breeding  of  fine  stock,  do- 
ing much  to  improve  the  grade  of  stock  raised  in  the  northwest.  Tic  was  equally 
interested  in  the  moral  development  of  his  community  and  became  one  of  the 
founders  of  the  First  Congregational  church  at  Forest  Grove,  in  which  he  served 
as  deacon.  He  always  gave  Ins  ])olitical  allegiance  to  the  rcpul)lican  party  and 
took  an  active  interest  in  politics.    One  of  his  reasons  for  leaving  the  south  was 


308  WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES 

his  opposition  to  the  practice  of  slavery,  and  before  leaving  Virginia  he  gave 
freedom  to  all  his  negroes.  In  a  word,  he  was  a  man  of  high  ideals  which  he 
carefully  exemplified  in  his  life.  He  held  to  the  highest  standards  in  relation  to 
material,  intellectual,  social,  political  and  moral  progress  and  his  efforts  along 
those  lines  were  far-reaching  and  beneficial. 

In  early  manhood  Thomas  G.  Naylor  wedded  Sarah  E.  Storey,  a  native  of 
Tennessee  and  a  daughter  of  Thomas  Storey,  who  was  descended  from  an  old 
English  family  connected  with  the  well  known  English  writer  of  that  name. 
Representatives  of  the  family  were  among  the  earliest  settlers  in  Tennessee. 
Mrs.  Naylor  shared  with  her  husband  in  all  of  the  hardships  and  privations  of 
pioneer  life  and  passed  away  at  Forest  Grove  in  1852,  at  the  age  of  thirty-twQ 
years.  In  the  family  were  three  sons  and  three  daughters,  of  whom  James  H. 
Naylor  was  the  fourth  in  order  of  birth  and  is  now  the  only  survivor.  One  of 
his  sisters  was-  the  wife  of  Rev.  Dr.  Weeks  of  Tacoma.  x\fter  losing  his  first 
wife  Thomas  G.  Na3'lor  married  again  and  there  were  also  six  children  of  the 
second  marriage. 

At  the  age  of  seventeen  years  James  H.  Naylor  left  home  and  took  up  the 
profession  of  teaching  at  a  place  called  Wapato,  Oregon.  He  had  acquired  his 
education  in  the  schools  of  Forest  Grove,  being  a  graduate  of  the  Pacific  Univer- 
sity and  also  of  a  commercial  college  of  Forest  Grove.  After  making  his  initial 
step  as  a  teacher  he  engaged  in  similar  professional  work  at  Black  River  and  at 
Tumwater  and  for  a  time  was  principal  of  the  Swantown  Academy  at  Olympia. 
For  eight  years  he  proved  a  capable  instructor  in  the  schoolroom,  imparting 
clearly  and  readily  to  others  the  knowledge  that  he  had  acquired.  During  that 
time  he  devoted  his  leisure  hours  to  the  reading  of  law  and  in  1880  successfully 
passed  the  required  examination  at  Chehalis,  which  permitted  him  to  practice 
at  the  Washington  bar.  He  then  opened  a  law  office  in  Chehalis  but  in  i88r 
removed  to  Ellensburg.  Washington,  where  he  remained  for  nine  years.  He 
then  returned  to  Chehalis,  where  he  resided  until  1895,  when  he  took  up  his  abode 
in  Everett.  There  he  has  since  continued  with  the  exception  of  two  years  spent 
in  Seattle.  He  engages  in  the  general  practice  of  law  in  all  of  the  courts  and 
his  pronounced  ability  is  manifest  in  his  able  handling  of  complex  and  intricate 
legal  problems.  He  is  very  careful  and  painstaking  in  the  preparation  of  his 
cases  and  he  is  a  worthy  exponent  of  the  high  ideals  of  the  profession  to  which 
life,  property,  and  liberty  must  look  for  protection. 

On  the  1 6th  of  April,  1870,  in  Tumwater,  \\'ashington,  Mr.  Naylor  was  united 
in  marriage  to  Miss  Cecelia  Crosby,  a  daughter  of  Captain  Claurick  Crosby,  and 
to  them  have  been  born  two  sons  and  three  daughters.  Leslie  resides  near  Great 
Falls,  Montana.  Alverta  is  the  wife  of  W.  E.  Brown,  proprietor  of  a  lumber 
mill  at  Vader,  Washington.  Ida  is  the  wife  of  Thomas  Ray,  residing  in  Colorado. 
C.  H.,  of  Tacoma,  who  for  many  years  was  prominently  connected  with  the  Great 
Northern  and  Canadian  Pacific  Railways,  is  now  identified  with  an  irrigation 
project  of  Oregon  and  makes  his  home  in  Seattle.  Margaret  is  the  wife  of  Frank 
Mead,  a  mining  engineer  and  assayer  located  at  Goldfield,  Nevada. 

The  rehgious  faith  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Naylor  is  that  of  the  Congregational 
church.  Fraternally  he  has  been  a  Mason  since  1872,  when  he  was  initiated  into 
the  order  at  Port  Townsend.  He  also  belongs  to  the  Elks  Lodge,  No.  249,  of 
Everett.     His  political  support  is  given  to  the  republican  party  and  he  served  as 


WASHINGTON,  WEST  OF  THE  CASCADES  309 

prosecuting  attorney  of  Snohomish  county  in  1897  ^"d  1898.  He  belongs  to 
the  County,  State  and  American  Bar  Associations  and  has  made  for  himself  a 
most  creditable  position  in  professional  circles.  While  in  his  practice  his  devo- 
tion to  his  clients'  interests  has  become  proverbial,  he  never  forgets  that  he  owes 
a  still  higher  allegiance  to  the  majesty  of  the  law. 


CHARLES  ANDERSON. 

Charles  Anderson,  a  representative  of  industrial  interests  of  Bellingham, 
being  part  owner  of  the  Lake  Shingle  Company,  is  one  of  the  excellent  citizens 
that  Sweden  has  furnished  to  Washington.  He  was  born  in  1868  and  there 
remained  during  his  boyhood  and  youth.  However,  in  May,  1888,  when  about 
twen